What to do with Acid & water mix after cleaning my cell

Richard320

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Jan 6, 2010
22,069
San Dimas, CA (LA County)
What exactly are you talking about? A cup of 1:10 diluted muriatic acid? Half a gallon of full-strength?

If the pool needs it, toss it in there. Got any scaling in the toilet? Maybe some concrete that could use a good scrubbing?
 

PoolGuyNJ

TFP Expert
May 20, 2007
3,192
South Central NJ
Normally, it goes to feed the pool. The pH will drop some. Without know how much you used, the current pH of the pool or your pool's size, I can't tell you exactly by how much.

Scott
 

chem geek

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Mar 28, 2007
12,083
San Rafael, CA USA
Yes it's safe and similar to adding baking soda to vinegar -- go ahead and try it (whenever working with concentrated acid, however, always wear some eye protection just in case something splatters). Basically, the acid reacts with the baking soda to produce carbon dioxide so it bubbles a lot. You just keep adding baking soda until it no longer bubbles and you've got something relatively neutralized. An interesting side effect of this reaction is that you end up with more liquid (water) than when you started because baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) is essentially a salt of carbon dioxide and water. Of course, with this combination you've just contributed to greenhouse gasses, but then again you do that every time you exhale!

You can also do the same thing with pH Up (Arm & Hammer Super Washing Soda; sodium carbonate) and will take less to neutralize, but will still have that bubbling effect.
 

Sportsman

Well-known member
Jan 27, 2010
233
Central Valley, CA
fascinating. After reading threads on storing MA, I debated what to do my left over for the winter. It's cheap enough locally to just neutralize a gallon and not worry about storage over the winter. Of course, I dont know how much baking soda it would take to neutralize a gallon and the process of dilute/soda/repeat could be a pain.

Do you dump the neutralized in the pool or down the drain? Does it matter?
 

chem geek

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Mar 28, 2007
12,083
San Rafael, CA USA
Sportsman said:
fascinating. After reading threads on storing MA, I debated what to do my left over for the winter. It's cheap enough locally to just neutralize a gallon and not worry about storage over the winter. Of course, I dont know how much baking soda it would take to neutralize a gallon and the process of dilute/soda/repeat could be a pain.

Do you dump the neutralized in the pool or down the drain? Does it matter?
It would take many pounds of baking soda to neutralize one gallon of Muriatic Acid -- roughly around 8 pounds plus a lot of carbon dioxide outgassing. For pH Up, it would be roughly 5 pounds. I would not dump the resulting mixture in the pool since the actual affect on the pH would be dependent on the amount of carbon dioxide outgassing and that's not very predictable. The result is basically salt water with very high Total Alkalinity and probably a somewhat high pH (around 9 or so). In 10,000 gallons it would probably increase TA by 7 ppm, salt by around 60 ppm and raise the pH a little (a few tenths), but again, this isn't very predictable and would only work this way if the acid and baking soda were mixed outside the pool since it assumes a lot of carbon dioxide outgassing (if added directly to the pool separately, the outgassing would be much slower and your pool water would be more acidic -- probably around 6.5 in pH).

Acid keeps really well so there's not really a need to get rid of it. Just store it away from metal. One could keep it outside -- just have it in a well-ventilated area.
 

teapot

In The Industry
Jul 25, 2009
574
London and France
chem geek said:
Acid keeps really well so there's not really a need to get rid of it. Just store it away from metal. One could keep it outside -- just have it in a well-ventilated area.
Make sure the container is U.V. stable, seen too many cases where containers have degraded under U.V.
 

geekgranny

LifeTime Supporter
Aug 20, 2009
1,358
North Central Texas
The many times I've acid washed my pool, over 24 years, I used baking soda to neutralize the collecting pool (probably lower pH than from soaking something - from rinsing the plaster with a lot of water but still pretty acidic) in the deep end and then pump it to the woods. For an acid wash of my pool there are many, many, many, "acid pools", during the process, that have to be pumped out. I haven't seen any problems with the native plants. And, yes, it takes a lot of lbs of baking soda but certainly takes care of the problem. When I've soaked the spa cartridges in MA/water I usually throw it into the pool, but my pool needs almost daily MA additions especially with fountain and keeping the pH at or below 7.2.

When you add the baking soda it will foam up and out of container so best to do it on gravel or dirt area; not a surface you want to change colors. But I must confess, when I soak cartridges, and don't put it in the pool, I do it on my Trex deck and add the BS in small additions so it doesn't foam over, most of the time, and keep a hose going at the base of the bucket.

I use loads of white vinegar (more acid than most colored vinegars) and BS around the house for cleaning. It's great for clearing out a slow drain and trap. Put gobs of baking soda in the drain, add vinegar, and then flush with very hot, but not boiling, water.

Another use would be to put it in a spray bottle, if you can filter particles out, and spray on some weeds, grasses, etc. It burns the plant when the sun hits it in a couple of days. Or dump it on a whole area of pest/weed plants. You have to get it on the green part of plant. I use garden white vinegar, very acidic, 20%, for some spot weed/pest plant killing. I feel better about using that in areas where the dogs might munch on plants. It doesn't work so well for poison ivy. You have to resort to the heavy stuff for that and, so far, I've only been able to wipe it out for one season and then it grows right back the next spring.

gg=alice
 

Hurricane Gio

LifeTime Supporter
Apr 6, 2010
200
Coral Gables, FL
Thank guys. it was 1 gallon of water with 2 quarts of acid. This is what the manual for my Aqua-Plus recommended. I cleaned the pad and the sidewalk with it and dumped the rest into a dirt/rock area in back of the house.
 

PoolGuyNJ

TFP Expert
May 20, 2007
3,192
South Central NJ
The proper mix is 1 part acid to 3 or 4 parts water.

If you have a proper storage container, you can reuse the mix several times.

Pouring it in the pool is the preferred and recommended way to dispose of it.

Scott
 

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