Stenner liquid chlorine pump - How to choose and install

Steve_in_C

Bronze Supporter
Jul 6, 2017
344
Kinston, NC
There's not enough technical information provided to know if the switch wil work. Volt / amp rating, normall open / closed? SPST, SPDP? Can't tell if this will work. Flow parameters? of / on at what flow. Just totally missing technical information. It's a gamble as to whether it will work. However, if you have a Hayward Goldline system, the advertised compatibility, then it might work for that application. I am not familiar with that.
 

JoyfulNoise

TFP Expert
Platinum Supporter
May 23, 2015
15,851
Tucson, AZ
There's not enough technical information provided to know if the switch wil work. Volt / amp rating, normall open / closed? SPST, SPDP? Can't tell if this will work. Flow parameters? of / on at what flow. Just totally missing technical information. It's a gamble as to whether it will work. However, if you have a Hayward Goldline system, the advertised compatibility, then it might work for that application. I am not familiar with that.
It’s basically a magnetic reed switch - open circuit with no flow, closed circuit with flow present. Most SWG type flow switches close at around 10-15GPM. The switch itself is not designed to handle any appreciable voltage or current except for whatever circuitry is used to detect the close/open state. You can think of it like a jumper or toggle switch on a printed circuit board.
 

runboy

Well-known member
Jun 26, 2018
146
Mesa/AZ
There's not enough technical information provided to know if the switch wil work. Volt / amp rating, normall open / closed? SPST, SPDP? Can't tell if this will work. Flow parameters? of / on at what flow. Just totally missing technical information. It's a gamble as to whether it will work. However, if you have a Hayward Goldline system, the advertised compatibility, then it might work for that application. I am not familiar with that.
It lists compatibility with a large range of Chlorine generators. From reading the reviews from some of the other Flow switches with the same compatibilities it seems pretty likely that its just a two wire normally open switch. People troubleshoot these by shortening a telefon wire and plugging it into their system. If it brings their system back to life, the switch is at fault.
Yes, there is no technical info, but if the switch has the characteristic described above a dry contact relay would work.


EDIT: I see that JoyfulNoise and Dirk beat me to it
 

Agent99

LifeTime Supporter
Aug 26, 2008
722
San Jose, CA
There's not enough technical information provided to know if the switch wil work. Volt / amp rating, normall open / closed? SPST, SPDP? Can't tell if this will work. Flow parameters? of / on at what flow. Just totally missing technical information. It's a gamble as to whether it will work. However, if you have a Hayward Goldline system, the advertised compatibility, then it might work for that application. I am not familiar with that.
Simple Load Sensing Automatic Switch - IBUILDIT.CA

I built this simple and relatively cheap circuit. I have a problem with my main pump's GFCI breaker (nuisance?) tripping 1-2 times per month. So I used this circuit to ensure that as long as the main pump is running, my pool cleaner pump AND my chlorine-injection will run. If the breaker trips, it will turn off the Stenner and pool cleaner pump. So far it has been working just fine since summer. Solid State relays are nice and quiet and should have long life (no moving parts) but they can get quite warm so venting them, or cooling them, or using heat sinks is a good idea.
 

Dirk

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Nov 12, 2017
4,409
Central California
Simple Load Sensing Automatic Switch - IBUILDIT.CA

I built this simple and relatively cheap circuit. I have a problem with my main pump's GFCI breaker (nuisance?) tripping 1-2 times per month. So I used this circuit to ensure that as long as the main pump is running, my pool cleaner pump AND my chlorine-injection will run. If the breaker trips, it will turn off the Stenner and pool cleaner pump. So far it has been working just fine since summer. Solid State relays are nice and quiet and should have long life (no moving parts) but they can get quite warm so venting them, or cooling them, or using heat sinks is a good idea.
I like the idea of the current sensing. If there's no power to the pump, then there's no injection. Seems pretty fail safe (as fail safe as electronics are, anyway). Which is more reliable: current sensing or flow sensing? Which is more likely to get "stuck" in the on mode?

Did you build yours using the same parts spec'd in the article? There is a warning that the item being "sensed" has to draw sufficient current to trigger the relay. Did you have any issues at the low end of your VS pump's RPM range?
 

Agent99

LifeTime Supporter
Aug 26, 2008
722
San Jose, CA
Yes, I used exactly what was spec'ed in the article (I had a pre-existing SSR so that was different) and YES, there can be issues sensing enough current if you aren't drawing enough current like one might in winter time running a variable speed pump at a very low speed. I experimented with my VS pump and I can render the circuit useless (i.e. not drawing enough current to sense) running the pump at a low rate. I don't recall where the RPMs were but I'd hazard it was 1k or less and the current sensing wouldn't work.

The current-sensing transformer in the diagram is the issue as the windings are 1:500 so it needs a healthy current input to output enough to allow the relay to work. So this circuit may not be ideal in the winter if you are running your VS at a very low rate. I personally don't see this as too much of an issue when I close the pool for the winter since I cover my pool, there is no need to run the booster pump and the chlorine demand is super low, too, so I could just manually dose.

That said, I plan to mess around a bit with the design and see if I can get the switch to work at low pump RPMs (low current) to make it better for our situation.
 

runboy

Well-known member
Jun 26, 2018
146
Mesa/AZ
Yes, I used exactly what was spec'ed in the article (I had a pre-existing SSR so that was different) and YES, there can be issues sensing enough current if you aren't drawing enough current like one might in winter time running a variable speed pump at a very low speed. I experimented with my VS pump and I can render the circuit useless (i.e. not drawing enough current to sense) running the pump at a low rate. I don't recall where the RPMs were but I'd hazard it was 1k or less and the current sensing wouldn't work.

The current-sensing transformer in the diagram is the issue as the windings are 1:500 so it needs a healthy current input to output enough to allow the relay to work. So this circuit may not be ideal in the winter if you are running your VS at a very low rate. I personally don't see this as too much of an issue when I close the pool for the winter since I cover my pool, there is no need to run the booster pump and the chlorine demand is super low, too, so I could just manually dose.

That said, I plan to mess around a bit with the design and see if I can get the switch to work at low pump RPMs (low current) to make it better for our situation.
I actually see it as a plus that it doesn't work at low flows. I prefer my chemical injection to happen during my cleaning cycle, so if it doesn't work during my low flow filtering its actually a plus.
 

Dirk

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Nov 12, 2017
4,409
Central California
I actually see it as a plus that it doesn't work at low flows. I prefer my chemical injection to happen during my cleaning cycle, so if it doesn't work during my low flow filtering its actually a plus.
A nice inadvertent feature, for sure. As long as the threshold is reliable and repeatable. Otherwise you might not get all the doses you think you're getting...
 

runboy

Well-known member
Jun 26, 2018
146
Mesa/AZ
A nice inadvertent feature, for sure. As long as the threshold is reliable and repeatable. Otherwise you might not get all to doses you think you're getting...
I have the Econ T so it has a timer built in. I just want the extra safety knowing the pump is running when I'm dispensing. Personally I will stick to the solution with a Flow switch on the line where I am dispensing chemicals since I could have the pump going full speed, but not delivering to my dispensing pipe.
 

Dirk

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Nov 12, 2017
4,409
Central California
I have redundancy on my system. My acid pump can only receive power when the pump is running, via automation (a fancy timer, in essence), and the acid pump controller monitors flow as a backup. The controller even shuts down my SWG during the minute or so it's injecting.

Timer plus flow switch (or current sensor) seems prudent. Since neither is 100% reliable, having both helps your odds...
 

Steve_in_C

Bronze Supporter
Jul 6, 2017
344
Kinston, NC
I think the average person should just synchronize timers. If you have enough knowledge to do something fancy with electric controls, you also have the knowledge to figure out how to do it. The possibilities are many.
 

Agent99

LifeTime Supporter
Aug 26, 2008
722
San Jose, CA
A nice inadvertent feature, for sure. As long as the threshold is reliable and repeatable. Otherwise you might not get all the doses you think you're getting...
Interesting points! Now I'm thinking to include a feature where one could DIAL IN the point where this current-sense switch starts (or stops) working.

In this way, one could simply tune the circuit (turn a dial...a potentiometer or something) to match one's desired operation of their chlorine injection relative to their pump's current draw (RPM level).

On a slight aside, I do have my chlorine injection AND booster pump on a timer (same timer). The output of my timer goes through this current sense switch and inputs to the booster and chlorine injection.
 

runboy

Well-known member
Jun 26, 2018
146
Mesa/AZ
What is the best way to vent my Stenner Acid and Chlorine tanks?
I initially used my pump line fail/overflow line in my chlorine setup as vent, but given that my pumps are enclosed in a box, It makes for a very corrosive environment.
This I especially discovered when I set up my acid setup.
I’m also concerned about my chems evaporating through the overflow lines.
So now I’m going to change my setup to have my overflow lines go to a third/fourth tank instead and put some kind of one way vent on my acid and chlorine tanks.
What is the preferred method?
 

Dirk

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Nov 12, 2017
4,409
Central California
Uh, I meant to, does that count? (And I have IntellipH, not Stenner.) My tank has a little vent fitting. I can connect a tube to that and run that tube away from my pad and other metal. I can't imagine I'd be losing much in the way of evaporation out of that tube (any?). And what if I did? So the mix would get a little stronger. I'm testing pH regularly, so it wouldn't be a problem.

So that's all I got. Except I'd take care and have the chlorine vent well away from the acid vent, just to play it safe. You don't want those two mixing, I would think.

When I typed in "how to vent a stenner tank" into the TFP search box, I got quite a few results.
 

runboy

Well-known member
Jun 26, 2018
146
Mesa/AZ
Except I'd take care and have the chlorine vent well away from the acid vent, just to play it safe.
Good point. I made the mistake at a young age to mix those two in a toilet bowl. Hadn't given much thought to the Chlorine gas to be honest. Now I have 15 gallons of Acid and 15 Gallons of Chloring sitting next to my heater. What could go wrong :drown: