I like my liquidator, it makes BBB super easy.

skillset

LifeTime Supporter
May 3, 2007
111
Central NJ
I know reduced chlorine effectiveness is caused by sunlight, but is it also caused by heat? If the unit is out in the sun, but no light penetrates the unit, would the chlorine stay pretty potent? I would imagine that most folks would mount this near their pump, which is generally not enclosed.
 

chem geek

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Mar 28, 2007
12,083
San Rafael, CA USA
Direct sunlight, specifically the ultraviolet (UV) light from the sun, breaks down chlorine very quickly. Heat (higher temperature) also breaks down chlorine faster as seen in this link. A 10F rise in temperature is roughly doubling the rate of degradation so cutting the half-life in half. If you use bleach instead of chlorinating liquid, however, the effect is lessened, but in this unit I do now know if over time the chlorine gets more or less concentrated as it gets used up since the chlorine/water layer moves as well.
 

JohnT

Admin
Mod Squad
TFP Expert
Apr 4, 2007
9,854
SW Indiana
chem geek said:
Direct sunlight, specifically the ultraviolet (UV) light from the sun, breaks down chlorine very quickly. Heat (higher temperature) also breaks down chlorine faster as seen in this link. A 10F rise in temperature is roughly doubling the rate of degradation so cutting the half-life in half. If you use bleach instead of chlorinating liquid, however, the effect is lessened, but in this unit I do now know if over time the chlorine gets more or less concentrated as it gets used up since the chlorine/water layer moves as well.
It seems to me that the compound the chlorine is in might be broken down by heat and light, but the chlorine will remain in some form. What is the "broken down" state of bleach?

ETA: I see that it is sodium chlorate. Also note that during manufacturing that the temperature has to be kept below 104F to prevent the chlorate from forming. Is that 104F the magic number for accelerated bleach breakdown, or is it just the point at which it becomes economically a problem during manufacturing? Is NaClO3 of any use in sanitizing a pool?
 

keithw

Well-known member
Mar 30, 2007
309
Virginia Beach
The nice thing about this design is that the chlorine is always submerged under a large layer of pool water. I would say that the container holds a total of about 10-15 gallons and you only add up to 4 gallons max of Chlorine. So the 6+ gallons of pool water keep the chlorine cool.
 

busbeepbeep

Member
Jul 5, 2007
24
New Orleans, LA
laff66 said:
does anyone have a picture of this thing? It sounds interesting, but the link provided above has no other info.
Here is a thread by cruzmisl with some real world pictures


It's amazing how little you can find about this product on the net. Is there anyone else who sells it besides that one vendor?
 

JCJR

LifeTime Supporter
May 4, 2007
267
Miami
I have a couple of questions.
I add salt to my BBB pool and it is around 1800ppm, does this create more sediment or an issue using this system? What kind of Chlorine usage should I expect if I use .5gal a day for a 24,000 gl pool with a cya of 45, using 12.5% chlorine, average pool temp 85 and outside temp getting into the 95% temp a couple of times a week? And lastly, do you guys think I could drop my CL target of 3-5ppm o 2-3 like is typical for a SWG due to CL levels at time of introduction to the system?
 

chem geek

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Mar 28, 2007
12,083
San Rafael, CA USA
JohnT said:
It seems to me that the compound the chlorine is in might be broken down by heat and light, but the chlorine will remain in some form. What is the "broken down" state of bleach?

ETA: I see that it is sodium chlorate. Also note that during manufacturing that the temperature has to be kept below 104F to prevent the chlorate from forming. Is that 104F the magic number for accelerated bleach breakdown, or is it just the point at which it becomes economically a problem during manufacturing? Is NaClO3 of any use in sanitizing a pool?
Sodium chlorate doesn't sanitize (as opposed to chorite which does sanitize, by combining with chlorine to form chlorine dioxide). And though chlorate is one by-product of breakdown of chlorine, it is most common in concentrated chlorine contaminated with metals. The more typical breakdown product of chlorine, especially from UV, is chloride. That is the chloride in sodium chloride or salt. The 104F is way, way too hot to store chlorine. They are just talking about the short-term manufacturing process. If you look at the table at the bottom of the link in my post, even normal outdoor temperatures of 90F will break down chlorine much faster, especially if it's more concentrated.
 

JasonLion

TFP Expert
Platinum Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
May 7, 2007
37,879
Silver Spring, MD
The forum is having problems today which is why there are so many duplicate posts and it is impossible to start new topics.

Bleach usage should be slightly lower with the liquidator because the peak FC level will be lower so the rate of breakdown from sunlight will be lower. With bleach, you presumably add it all at once once a day. That higher level increases breakdown from sunlight. But what matters for sanitizing is the lowest daily level, so the level right after adding bleach is higher than it needs to be with a continuous feed system. Thus the continuous feed system has lower loss to sunlight.

Several of us have been wondering if a lower FC level will work with continuous bleach feed systems the way it does with a SWG. So far there is way too little experience with these systems to draw a firm conclusion.
 

keithw

Well-known member
Mar 30, 2007
309
Virginia Beach
The salt shouldn't be a problem with the liquidator. I have my pool salted to 2700PPM and haven't had any issues. I have no clue on what your CL consumption will be though.
 

Sabot

LifeTime Supporter
Aug 2, 2007
343
Austin, TX
As I wait for my pool construction to begin, I have been watching this product for some time. I have a few questions...

1. How long has this product been on the market?
2. Any updates on how the product is working for you that own it? How long have you owned it?
3. What do you do with the salts and solids at the bottom of the container?
4. How do you clean out the containers?
5. I live in Central Texas where it can get over 100 degrees. How would morning sun effect the chlorine stored in the product?
6. I am planning to build a simple cover over the equipment pad to keep direct sunlight off the equipment, should this aid in prolonging the chlorine life?
7. Being a first time owner of a pool, should I start out on the 3" tabs and then move to BBB? What tabs would you recommend?

Sorry for the questions!

Thanks in advance.

Mike
 

keithw

Well-known member
Mar 30, 2007
309
Virginia Beach
1. I am not sure but it is made by HAAS and they have been around for quite some time.
2. Still working great, have had mine a few months now.
3. Leave them there. Doesn't hurt anything. Based on the rate that they accumulate, I anticipate that I will clean them out and give the Liquidator a good cleaning at the end of every season.
4. Disconnect the inlet and outlet and wash it all out.
5. Sun bad. If in sun, then build box.
6. Yes, good idea.
7. Were it me, I would just just buy stabilizer (CYA) and get it straightaway up to the right CYA and start out with bleach. Cheaper and easier.
 

Sabot

LifeTime Supporter
Aug 2, 2007
343
Austin, TX
Thanks for taking time to answer my questions!

Another question, being that I am central Texas we do get a week or so of below freezing weather but we don't close our pools like the folks up north. We run our equipment 24hrs during freezing periods to prevent damage. How will liquidator do during cold stretches?

Keep in mind that we can have days if not a solid week of below freezing temps with some night temps down around low teens or colder. Is there enough circ in the liquidator to keep ice from forming?