I like my liquidator, it makes BBB super easy.

keithw

Well-known member
Mar 30, 2007
305
Virginia Beach
There was an earlier post where we had discussed this automatic chlorinator made by Ezpool, http://www.ezpool.com/

I've had mine for just under a month now and it works great. I fill it with chlorine whenever it runs out and the pool stays at 4-7PPM chlorine all the time. My pool has alway been very clear since I switched to bleach but it is actually clearer now than it was when I was manually adding bleach. I suppose it might be because the Liquidator is more consistent that I was. Also it is surprising the amount of sediment that comes out of the bleach and settles on the bottom of the container.
 

chem geek

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Mar 28, 2007
12,083
San Rafael, CA USA
KeithW,

Let us know if you do in fact find that salts settle to the bottom of The Liquidator container. Though salt gradients do exist, usually they are maintained (in the ocean for example) by temperature or evaporation gradients. Typically, the Brownian motion (getting hit by water molecules) is enough to diffuse the salt up higher into solution and the gradient typically isn't that strong. Interestingly, the claim is that though salt and possibly sodium hydroxide stay in the lower layer, the hypochlorite (and sodium for charge balance) migrate into the upper layer, at least enough for chlorination. If that is the case, then why wouldn't chloride also migrate since it's even lighter than hypochlorite? Something about this doesn't make sense.

The higher density of hypochlorite solutions does lead credence to the claim by some pool builders that using bleach (and presumably chlorinating liquid) to vinyl pools damages them. If such solutions are poured quickly and not over a return with the pump running, then the liquid will tend to fall to the bottom of the pool. In some above-ground vinyl pools, there is no floor drain so the circulation at the bottom is very poor so the concentrated hypochlorite solution could settle there (of course, this can happen with Cal-Hypo as well, but is more obvious as white granules on the bottom). It's highly alkaline so there is a limit to the actual disinfecting chlorine (hypochlorous acid) concentration of around 10 ppm or so, but that's pretty high. Of course, we have no proof that even such high concentrations of chlorine will be harmful to vinyl -- acidic conditions are known to be damaging, but one person did an experiment with a piece of vinyl in water with concentrated chlorine solution and did not find any degradation, but that was for a short period of time.

Also, let us know if you find any increased evidence of corrosion if you put The Liquidator inside a pool shed near equipment. Even storing chlorine in bottles is risky unless well sealed since the chlorine fumes can be corrosive over time (same is true for acid).

Note that the instructions (found here) talk about potential scaling unless the pH and/or TA are kept low if the CH is high. This is probably because the water gets alkaline (rises in pH) due to the chlorine and that can cause scaling if TA and CH are high. This is also true for manual chlorination, but is not as much of a problem since its not a continuous buildup.

The really nice thing about this system, in addition to its convenience, is that it introduces a very low level of chlorine through the system even more continually than an SWG system. It's operating whenever the pump is on so if there is one turnover per day, then the concentration of added chlorine is only whatever the consumption is per day, so if that's 3 ppm FC then it introduces chlorine at that rate above what is already in the pool. So the disinfecting chlorine level hitting the pump and other equipment will be roughly double whatever the chlorine level you target in the bulk pool water. That is far less than what happens when you shock the pool so would seem very safe.

Richard
 

keithw

Well-known member
Mar 30, 2007
305
Virginia Beach
I can confirm that there are definitely solids accumulating on the bottom of the container. I have been using the system for less than a month and already there is significant buildup of solids. A good portion of the bottom area is fully covered. In regards to the fumes, there is surprisingly almost none and I have mine in a small enclosed space. The Chlorine is poured through a funnel down below the water layer in and that seems to effectively keeping the fumes to a minimum.
 

No P in my ool

LifeTime Supporter
Jun 21, 2007
219
Logan IA
It appears that there is supposed to be solids in the bottom,that is one of the features-solids in the tank and not the pool.
Where did you purchase this?
 

Rangeball

Well-known member
May 25, 2007
785
keithw, what is the recommend procedure for cleaning the solids from the tank, and how often do you anticipate this will be needed?
 

chem geek

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Mar 28, 2007
12,083
San Rafael, CA USA
Though this does sound like a great product, the website says the following:

In most pools and spas that are sanitized with liquid chlorine (Sodium Hypochlorite), the liquid is poured directly into the water or pumped in using a chemical feed pump. This provides the chlorine necessary for sanitation, but it also introduces additional chemical salts that drive the pH up and contributes to the build up of dissolved solids.

Chemical salts that drive the pH Up? They must be talking about the extra sodium hydroxide that is in the chlorinating liquid. It is true that it increases pH, but very slowly. 10 gallons of 12.5% chlorinating liquid in 10,000 gallons of pool water would (cumulatively) be 125 ppm FC and would raise the pH (after the chlorine is used up) from 7.5 to 7.72 (at a TA of 100, CYA of 30) and would require 7.5 ounces of Muriatic Acid to compensate. So there is a benefit, but it's not huge.

The lower buildup of TDS may be from both the sodium hydroxide and acid to compensate, but is also from regular salt.

Don't get me wrong -- this sounds like a great product. I just like to know how things work and the patent isn't clear on how hypochlorite gets into the water while most of the chloride does not.
 

keithw

Well-known member
Mar 30, 2007
305
Virginia Beach
The solids just go to the bottom and sit there. There are shutoff valves on the in and out tubes so to clean, I will just wait until I have used up all of the bleach in the unit, shut of both valves, unhook it and wash it out. You can easily see the bleach level in the bottom as a yellow layer below the water layer.

Yes I would agree that the chlorine would lose it's effectiveness pretty quickly in the sun. I have mine in an enclosed storage room with the pump and filter.

Chem, you are over my head on some of your insights but all I can say is that my CL is super stable, and there is crud slowly building up in the bottom. I can only assume that that crud would be in my pool if I were applying the chlorine directly as I did in the past.
 

cruzmisl

Well-known member
May 26, 2007
185
I've had mine for a few months and it still works great. I used the wrong line on my test kit for TA nad mistakenly added 20lbs of baking soda :oops: so my TA went to 200. In an effort to reduce it, lots of aeration and muriatic acid (a gallon or so over time) it's back down to 110ppm and 7.2pH so I geared down the aeration. This is going somehwere :)

Anyway, during that time the liquidator hoses got coated with some type of salt. It was white, hard and crusty. It didn't alllow the flow meter to work properly but it still worked. I bought some new hose and soaked the plastic parts in a 5-1 mixture of water/muriatic acid. IT fizzed liek alka-seltzer for a minute and it looks brand new.

My point is you have to keep an eye on TA and pH. Mine went high when I was trying to reduce TA and it caused this problem which is clearly detailed in the owners manual. It's a joke to clean but the problem was my fault not the LIquidator. I still REALLY like it.
 

JohnT

Admin
Mod Squad
TFP Expert
Apr 4, 2007
9,601
SW Indiana
Keith,

Do you use bleach (5.25% or 6%) or do you use the stronger 10-12% stuff in your unit? I don't have a source for the shock within 45 miles, which could be an issue for me.