Still confused on how to open the pool up

svtcobra

Well-known member
Dec 3, 2019
101
Chicago, IL
First off I'd like to say I'm very much enjoying the site and the information.

I've posted on here in the past but the consensus seems to buy a test kit but I don't know if my equipment works/leaks etc.

Also we have had record braking amount of rain here in May and the pool water is rising. I don't know how to drain it. Is the only way with a pump?

A pool company recommended they pump out the water and clean it with acid. That way they can see how the walls look and then I'd fill it up.

I do not know what material my pool is made up of but there is any risk of it popping out of place after the drain?

I do plan on buying the test kit from the recommended site but want to make sure the equipment at least works before going that route.
 

Attachments

fields_g

Well-known member
Dec 25, 2014
152
Rockville, MD
There are people just waiting for posts like this to come up. Likely, the advise given by the pool company is premature. Were they on premise when they made such a suggestion?

Before those pros find this, you can start by providing some more information:
Could you give us makes/models of your equipment? (Enter this into your signature)
Pictures of your pool plumbing could be useful.
It doesn't look like water is circulating. Do you know how to do that?
As we clean/maintain the pool a trusted testkit is important. Do you have one on hand? (edit: see you don't have one yet)

To avoid the green monster, I close my pool after water temperature drops below 60 degrees and get it running and chlorinated before it rises above 60 in the summer.
 
  • Like
Reactions: svtcobra

svtcobra

Well-known member
Dec 3, 2019
101
Chicago, IL
Attached some photos I can get closer ups later today and will update the signature.

Yes the pool company was on site. They said the best option would be to drain and clean the walls etc(lots of leaves at the bottom).

I have no idea on how to get the water to circulate.

I have a large pool net but it's very difficult to get the leaves on the bottom of the deep end. I


I bought the house back in Nov 2019 and not sure how long the pool was abandoned for.

I saw that there are multiple options for test kits kind of confused as to which one I needed. Any recommendations?
 

Attachments

Newdude

Well-known member
Jun 16, 2019
3,268
NY
You will need the TF-100 with the XL option. If you choose to not drain you will go through a lot of testing and the XL kit comes with extras to last. The better priced kits seem like a deal, but in your case, aren’t.

on the plus side, While time can cause a bunch of problems (and we don't know how much time has passed), while that pool was open it was probably cared for. It has a SWG, a heater and some sort of Stennner/Acid/chlorine pump. Chances are if someone spent that much money on upgrades, They would use and care for it. The big parts that are critical may very work fine if you fire them up.
 
  • Like
Reactions: svtcobra

crocop

Well-known member
May 5, 2016
145
Toronto
For test kit, pick up the TF-100 or Taylor K-2006 test kits.

As for the rest, i would NOT recommend calling the pool company again. Your equipment looks pretty good....and assuming its working, the pros on this site will have you with a sparking blue pool in several weeks (and hundreds of dollars saved)...

I do not think you need to drain that water though...I had wayyyy worse swamp water 5 years ago when I also bought a house with a neglected pool....and well, TRP took care of me :)

As for your next steps and what to do, I will leave it up to the experts....but I do know the first thing you need is the preferred test kit because they will be asking you the #'s to be able to guide you step by step.

Good luck and I look forward to the progress!
 
  • Like
Reactions: svtcobra

Newdude

Well-known member
Jun 16, 2019
3,268
NY
Part 2.

as far as the cleanup goes, I would vote to drain at least most of it. At some point you will be low enough to be able to see what’s left on the bottom. Could be a layer of sludge, Could be a foot. You very well could spend 2-3 weeks scooping up the crud if you leave it full. And then have to SLAM. Draining most of it will still be safe for the shell while speeding up the process considerably.
 
  • Like
Reactions: svtcobra

borjis

LifeTime Supporter
Aug 19, 2014
3,190
Pacific NW
Any concern about the water table with draining this pool down? I would only drain until there is 2ft of water on the shallow side. Just wanted to be sure they are aware...being a new pool owner. And this is plaster, not vinyl lined...right?
 
  • Like
Reactions: svtcobra

svtcobra

Well-known member
Dec 3, 2019
101
Chicago, IL
So I'm not sure how to determine if this is plaster versus vinyl? Im going to purchase the TF-100 test kit. I'll make sure to have it drained with 2 feet water remaining.
 

svtcobra

Well-known member
Dec 3, 2019
101
Chicago, IL
Any concern about the water table with draining this pool down? I would only drain until there is 2ft of water on the shallow side. Just wanted to be sure they are aware...being a new pool owner. And this is plaster, not vinyl lined...right?
By the way what if this swimming pool were to overflow with all of the rainfall. it has risen quite a bit in the past couple of months. I just don't have a clue on how to drain it
 

Newdude

Well-known member
Jun 16, 2019
3,268
NY
Brush a spot on the wall clean with your hand. It will either feel like rubbing cement or a beach ball. If it’s cement like it will be some sort of plaster. Underneath the vinyl liner will be either steel or concrete but that part isn’t important now.

get a submersible pump from HD/Lowe’s or your hardware store. usually the better ones are about $125 and it’s something you’ll need long term anyway. If you get within a couple inches of the patio, drain 6 inches and it will buy you more time until it refills.
 

svtcobra

Well-known member
Dec 3, 2019
101
Chicago, IL
Brush a spot on the wall clean with your hand. It will either feel like rubbing cement or a beach ball. If it’s cement like it will be some sort of plaster. Underneath the vinyl liner will be either steel or concrete but that part isn’t important now.

get a submersible pump from HD/Lowe’s or your hardware store. usually the better ones are about $125 and it’s something you’ll need long term anyway. If you get within a couple inches of the patio, drain 6 inches and it will buy you more time until it refills.
Oh nice thanks! It does look rugged but I'll do the feel check today. I actually have quite a few submersible pumps from fish keeping days but not sure if they are large enough. Is there a certain size pump I should look for that will take out a certain number of gallons per minute?
 

Newdude

Well-known member
Jun 16, 2019
3,268
NY
Nope. The smaller pumps work fine they just take longer. When I need to drain in the off season I pick a weekend day and just check it every few hours knowing it will take all day to clear 16 inches. ‘Ok I have 7 inches to go.... plenty of time to run to Home Depot’.

edit. As long as the pumps are for garden hoses. Aquarium pumps probably are too small. Just saw that part.
 
  • Like
Reactions: svtcobra

borjis

LifeTime Supporter
Aug 19, 2014
3,190
Pacific NW
Before you drain down with 2ft water left in shallow end, it would be best to know if it's vinyl or not.
Some installations can get stressed on the walls. I know I can drain mine down because I have a concrete shell vinyl lined pool. And the water table is 2 feet below the 7ft deep end. But for some other types it can stress the wall structure if your water table is high.
 
  • Like
Reactions: svtcobra

svtcobra

Well-known member
Dec 3, 2019
101
Chicago, IL
Brush a spot on the wall clean with your hand. It will either feel like rubbing cement or a beach ball. If it’s cement like it will be some sort of plaster. Underneath the vinyl liner will be either steel or concrete but that part isn’t important now.

get a submersible pump from HD/Lowe’s or your hardware store. usually the better ones are about $125 and it’s something you’ll need long term anyway. If you get within a couple inches of the patio, drain 6 inches and it will buy you more time until it refills.
Felt the surface after viewing the million and one tadpoles in the water haha. It felt pretty smooth. Stairs had a bit of roughness which makes sense.
I almost want to say it felt like a beach ball versus the roughness of cement. Thoughts? And thanks for your guidance on this.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Newdude

svtcobra

Well-known member
Dec 3, 2019
101
Chicago, IL
Before you drain down with 2ft water left in shallow end, it would be best to know if it's vinyl or not.
Some installations can get stressed on the walls. I know I can drain mine down because I have a concrete shell vinyl lined pool. And the water table is 2 feet below the 7ft deep end. But for some other types it can stress the wall structure if your water table is high.
I did a feel test and it felt smooth. Any other way to confirm what I have?
 

Newdude

Well-known member
Jun 16, 2019
3,268
NY
I almost want to say it felt like a beach ball versus the roughness of cement
Its probably vinly then. Can you get a clear pic of the waterline ? If its vinyl it should connect to a track beneath the coping. Plaster would probably have actual tile at the waterline instead of a printed tile like design....... which reminds me, were you feeling the tile at the water line as being smooth ? If so go deeper and you'll probably feel the plaster.
 
  • Like
Reactions: svtcobra

svtcobra

Well-known member
Dec 3, 2019
101
Chicago, IL
Its probably vinly then. Can you get a clear pic of the waterline ? If its vinyl it should connect to a track beneath the coping. Plaster would probably have actual tile at the waterline instead of a printed tile like design....... which reminds me, were you feeling the tile at the water line as being smooth ? If so go deeper and you'll probably feel the plaster.
The tile area seemed more rough so I felt bow the tile line and it seemed smooth. I didn't get too deep in just a handful. I can get a better picture tomorrow but attached some photos of what I had on my phone when I was concerned about the water line.
 

Attachments

svtcobra

Well-known member
Dec 3, 2019
101
Chicago, IL
What happens when you try to turn the system on?
Total new guy here. The owner was not at the closing and I have no idea how to turn anything on etc. The pool company was nice enough to say they will teach me how to work on everything and things of that nature but I also do not want to get ripped off. I had a quote from a different pool company that said I need to to retile the whole pool.
 

batesjer

Gold Supporter
Silver Supporter
Jun 26, 2019
37
East Lansing michigan
Can you take a picture of the equipment pad? Specifically the pump and the electric panel. Someone may be able to help you drain the water level enough to answer some more of your questions. Nevermind I see them above. I'm assuming your on/off switch for the pump is inside that rusted box that the electrical goes in to? If you open it up are there timers and an on/off switch? If you get the pump on you can turn the valve on top of the filter to waste and lower the water level a couple inches so you don't have any overflow.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: svtcobra