Solved!! High CYA, Chlorine Smell on Skin, Stinging Eyes

GoneFishing

Member
Jun 19, 2020
11
SE Florida
[You can skip down to my AN UPDATE ON PROGRESS post later on, it summarizes my solutions experience]

Another newbie here, recently renting a house in SE FL with a pool and inherited a pool guy who has been coming out once a week. He uses a liquid test kit, but only seems to check chlorine (and from the top of the water), installs a pool tablet in the floating dispenser, dumps more liquid chlorine into the pool, and off he goes. Two weeks ago I went for a swim and 1) eyes were burning when opened under water, 2) took two days for my skin to stop smelling like chlorine (4 showers later as well). Mentioned this to pool dude and he said too much chlorine in water plus pH high so he dumped several cups of baking soda into the water and didn't dump his usual half-bottle of bleach.
Frustrated at not knowing what the pool needed or didn't need, I bought a Taylor test kit K2006 and tested the water myself just yesterday. I've read as much as I can here and on other websites but it's still all a bit confusing, especially the significance of the numbers (as the saying goes, there are only three kinds of people in the world - those that can do math and those that can't). I've looked at the charts until they resemble eye tests rather than relevant data. So, I'll post what I have and hopefully someone can give me a layman's understanding of what needs doing? With thanks!
Pool is kidney shaped, concrete/plaster, approx. 11' x 24', shallow end 3' and deep end 5' at drain. Water used for testing was collected at shallow end, inverted tubes down to elbow depth then turned tubes over to collect water.
Measured FAS-DPD as .5 point, used 15 drops (equals 7.5ppm Free?), then 4 drops for CC (is that 2ppm?)
pH looks like 7.8+, but not really sure I'm seeing the colors correctly, even held at eye level in sunlight. Took 3 drops acid demand to look like 7.2 pH
TA took 9 drops (90ppm?)
CA took 29 drops (290ppm?)
CYA sorta/kinda looks like it was 90ppm before black dot disappeared (looking for it to disappear but it seemed to disappear then come back once or twice), but again that's a newbie looking at it
Water temp was 85 degrees during testing.
Water looks clear enough now, but I just about gave up the idea of swimming in the pool ever again after my previous eye/skin debacle!
I've now bought chlorine household bleach with no additives, big bags of baking soda and boxes of Borax, plus the test kit, so I'm willing to give pool maintenance a "go" provided I can make sense of what I'm doing. I'll read how to clean the filter and do that too.
Advice on these numbers to help me become my own pool guy going forward would be appreciated.
PS: Pool guy dumps the chemical-mixed tubes of water into the pool after each test, I thought I read that was not a good thing to do? Mods, please feel free to move this post if not the appropriate forum, thanks
 
Last edited:

setsailsoon

Gold Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
TFP Guide
Oct 25, 2015
3,390
Stuart/FL
Fish,

Welcome to TFP!

We'll get you fixed up soon. You're not alone with your pool guy. It's great that you have a test kit so you can start the recovery right away. TFP is loaded with real experts and we don't sell anything so you'll never need to be concerned about. I was right in your shoes 6 years ago. At that time many experts that helped me are still here. Now I'm giving back a little by helping too. Please add your "signature" here's how. Also please read this if you haven't already done so.ABCs of Pool Water Chemistry. Ask any questions you may have. You are going to need to fine tune your CYA test. Use the dilution method by testing a 50% solution of pool water and tap water. Then do your CYA test again and double the answer. Since you've been using tablets and probably for a long time you have a buildup of CYA that is inhibiting your chlorine from working. This means you also probably have algae and other organics that are being converted to chloramines which is causing the eye irritation and chlorine smell. The only way to fix this is to drain or do a water exchange. This is why we recommend liquid chlorine instead of tablets. They are about half chlorine and half CYA. The chlorine gets consumed or burned off quickly the CYA does not. Thus your build up. After your additional CYA test please post it here we'll find out how much you need to drain. Take the tablets out and don't add anymore. For now you'll be using liquid chlorine. You'll learn TFP system in days not weeks just like I did. You'll be using cheap big box store generic chemicals for almost everything and your pool will look gorgeous. This place is loaded with experts on everything related to pools. So for any pool issue that crops up you'll have expert unbiased advice.

Looking forward to that CYA test result.

Chris
 

IceShadow

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jun 8, 2019
2,177
Milwaukee, WI
Another newbie here, recently renting a house in SE FL with a pool and inherited a pool guy who has been coming out once a week. He uses a liquid test kit, but only seems to check chlorine (and from the top of the water), installs a pool tablet in the floating dispenser, dumps more liquid chlorine into the pool, and off he goes. Two weeks ago I went for a swim and 1) eyes were burning when opened under water, 2) took two days for my skin to stop smelling like chlorine (4 showers later as well). Mentioned this to pool dude and he said too much chlorine in water plus pH high so he dumped several cups of baking soda into the water and didn't dump his usual half-bottle of bleach.
Frustrated at not knowing what the pool needed or didn't need, I bought a Taylor test kit K2006 and tested the water myself just yesterday. I've read as much as I can here and on other websites but it's still all a bit confusing, especially the significance of the numbers (as the saying goes, there are only three kinds of people in the world - those that can do math and those that can't). I've looked at the charts until they resemble eye tests rather than relevant data. So, I'll post what I have and hopefully someone can give me a layman's understanding of what needs doing? With thanks!
Pool is kidney shaped, concrete, approx. 11' x 24', shallow end 3' and deep end 5' at drain. Water used for testing was collected at shallow end, inverted tubes down to elbow depth then turned tubes over to collect water.
Measured FAS-DPD as .5 point, used 15 drops (equals 7.5ppm Free?), then 4 drops for CC (is that 2ppm?)
pH looks like 7.8, but not really sure I'm seeing the colors correctly, even held at eye level in sunlight. Took 3 drops acid demand to look like 7.2 pH
TA took 9 drops (90ppm?)
CA took a whopping 29 drops (290ppm?)
CYA sorta/kinda looks like it was 90ppm before black dot disappeared (looking for it to disappear but it seemed to disappear then come back once or twice), but again that's a newbie looking at it
Water temp was 85 degrees during testing.
Water looks clear enough now, but I just about gave up the idea of swimming in the pool ever again after my previous bleach-bath debacle!
I've now bought chlorine tablets, chlorine household bleach with no additives, big bags of baking soda and boxes of Borax, plus the test kit, so I'm willing to give pool maintenance a "go" provided I can make sense of what I'm doing. I'll read how to clean the filter and do that too.
Advice on these numbers to help me become my own pool guy going forward would be appreciated.
PS: Pool guy dumps the chemical-mixed tubes of water into the pool after each test, I thought I read that was not a good thing to do? Mods, please feel free to move this post if not the appropriate forum, thanks
The CC is causing the eyes and skin issue. Great job on getting a kit!

My recommendation is to tell the pool guy you’re going to handle the chemicals and let him do the cleaning/scrubbing. You’ll end up adding some liquid chlorine daily but it’s not usually a big deal. Keep the tabs out of the pool. The CYA is causing issues.

Try the CYA test but this time first mix half tap water, half pool water and test that. Then multiply the result by two. We’ll see if it’s really around 90. :)
 

GoneFishing

Member
Jun 19, 2020
11
SE Florida
Thanks setsailsoon and IceShadow!
I will update my signature with pool info soon (gotta figure out what's what)
Today I tried the half pool water/half tap water CYA test (FWIW water temp 84 degrees) but the liquid never got cloudy! However I then did the all-pool-water test again, cloudy liquid, and the dot disappeared at 80. I also retested pH and looked to be 7.7, took 1 drop to get to 7.4
Measured FAS-DPD again at .5 mark, used 12 drops, then 2 drops for CC
Bought 6 gallons 6% bleach today too. Then found some 12% bleach in a pool section, not much more in price per gallon... sigh.
Looks like pool equates to about 7500 gallons (guesstimate) - see measurements in first post. Pump appears to be Hayward HST080, .8hp, w. StarClear Plus cartridge filter. Runs from 12pm to 5pm daily. Pressure looks like 10psi while running. It also has an inline Model 320 Rainbow Lifeguard automatic chlorine/bromine feeder but that hasn't been used since I've lived in the house.
So I look forward to specifics to balancing the water for crystal clarity and no more skin/eye sting and stink! Thanks in advance ;)
 
Last edited:

setsailsoon

Gold Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
TFP Guide
Oct 25, 2015
3,390
Stuart/FL
Fish,

CYA above 60 is not recommended. Reason is it requires much more FC to properly disinfect and SLAM level is extremely high. You already have a cc of greater than .5 ppm which is an indication you need a SLAM. If you see any algae that's another indicator. You could also run an OCLT tonight to confirm if you want to. Please read Overnight Chlorine Loss Test this and ask any questions. I would do a water exchange to get your CYA within recommended range first. Then your SLAM will be relatively short so long as you follow the procedure precisely.

Please see the videos below before you start.

Chris


 

carnivalday

Gold Supporter
Bronze Supporter
Oct 25, 2017
581
Ocala, FL
I dont know what your deal is with the landlord, but Id tell him to stop the pool service and you'll do it yourself. Maybe you'll get a bit of a discount on rent, and your pool will look and feel wonderful.
 

GoneFishing

Member
Jun 19, 2020
11
SE Florida
Thanks for all the great advice. Will talk to the landlord about getting a pro service to do the water exchange because if the pool "floats" or cracks or anything goes wrong with that adventure I don't want to be responsible! Once the chemistry is properly adjusted after that point and NO MORE CHLORINE HOCKEY PUCKS being used, then yes I agree it appears to be a fairly straight forward process to be a do-it-yourself project, especially with using the Taylor kit to keep up on the water status ;-) No discount on rent however as the pool maintenance (whether we use the pool or not) ends up being our expense, ah well.
 
  • Like
Reactions: setsailsoon

TheDeuce

Gold Supporter
Jul 9, 2019
135
Winnipeg, Manitoba
One piece of advice I'll offer after having completed my first SLAM: if you have a UV disinfecting light in your system turn it off before performing the OCLT. I kept losing FC during my OCLT even though my water was crystal clear and my CC's were near zero. Someone eventually noted how the UV from the sun consumes FC so I inferred that my UV light, left on all night, was similarly consuming FC during the OCLT. Once I figured out how to turn off the UV unit (had to use the GIFI) I passed the OCLT with flying colours.


m.
 

GoneFishing

Member
Jun 19, 2020
11
SE Florida
Great thoughts, thanks.
I talked w. pool store pro who confirmed my numbers via another water sample testing, and he told me they're not allowed to have commercial pools over 40 CYA/stabilizer, with this rental one being around 80 (or possibly above) from what I'm reading here it will make it a challenge to keep chlorine levels adequate. I've mentioned to landlord about replacing water to bring number down (already got rid of all tablets that were being used by pool guy) but he's not quite convinced it's necessary to do the water replacement as some documents say 80-90 stabilizer is OK and suggested adding more water, however to his credit he said he'd OK the water swap if it had to be done. From reading many articles here I'll also see about a phosphate test and maybe if there's any issue with that it can be eliminated too in the process.
 
Last edited:

GoneFishing

Member
Jun 19, 2020
11
SE Florida
Well, with thanks to advice from this Forum, did some "adjusting" to pool water including some replacement of water (couldn't do a half at one go, however was able to lower CYA to 70 down from 80-90, still working on this), and no use of trichlor tablets for several weeks. Muriatic acid brought pH down to a nice 7.5. Free chlorine today is 4.2 with last addition of liquid chlorine three days ago so will add more today. Combined chlorine down from 2 to .4 Undoubtedly the previous "2" of CC was causing the burning eyes sensation and chlorine smell strong on skin after swimming? Still want to replace enough water to bring CYA lower and do a SLAM, but hopefully am on the right track now.
 
  • Like
Reactions: carnivalday

GoneFishing

Member
Jun 19, 2020
11
SE Florida
An update on progress:

When the great "team of thousands" here on TFP tell you that you can take excellent care of your pool on your own, believe it :)
A very uncomfortable experience with after-swim skin issues from our rental's pool which was being managed by a mobile pool guy led me to research how to "fix" this unhappy situation. I had asked the pool guy a number of questions regarding pool care and wasn't able to get specific answers or answers that seemed to make sense, so I began the journey of learning about pool chemistry and management. Here's where TFP was invaluable!

STEP ONE: Learn about your pool - type, size, equipment
I used the guidance here to figure out how many gallons of water the pool contains. (PoolMath App PoolMath - Trouble Free Pool) I also checked out all of the pump system equipment to see what was what. This was my starting point. For what it's worth, the TFP PoolMath app didn't work for me as my phone doesn't allow apps to do GPS tracking (which PoolMath requires) so I used this link here which has similar info: PoolMath. As was suggested to me here, I added information I learned about the pool to my forum signature, thus making it easier for other members to have an idea of my pool's specs when reading/commenting on my posts.

STEP TWO: Become familiar with the purpose and results of testing pool water.
I read all of the Pool School articles on this site, then I did searches for specific questions I had regarding issues with this pool. The articles were so helpful, and the answers to people's questions relating to similar issues helped make a big difference in my understanding as well.

STEP THREE: Prepare to test.
I took the good advice here and bought a Taylor K-2006 Complete test kit (FAS-DPD chlorine), this one from Amazon. After reading about mixed results using 'stick' dip tests and/or depending on pool store results this seemed like a good investment for a clean and healthy pool. I also went with a FAS-DPD test kit as it also tests for Combined Chlorine (CC) as well as Free Chlorine (FC) - I needed to know if there was an abundance of organic material in the pool affecting chlorine needs, which the CC test helps to indicate.
I prepared the area where I was going to do my testing, ready with a towel and some paper towels and a disposable plastic container to dump rinsed out/used water samples, and paper/pen - or cellphone if using PoolMath app - for recording results. I made sure to have a plastic container ready because Taylor's test kits say DO NOT dump the tested samples back into your pool!! The towel of course was for my wet arm after gathering the water sample, and the paper towels are for any spills and to wipe out the little plastic "spoon" used for the DPD powder (residual powder left on the spoon turns black, and you don't want to stick a wet spoon into the powder either).
I followed instruction and gathered a bottle of sample water from the pool down by the deep end (bought a cheap plastic ketchup dispenser bottle from discount store, works great and makes rinsing the sample containers very easy with the squirt top on the ketchup bottle). I stuck the uncapped bottle upside-down in the water to elbow depth, then inverted the bottle to fill it. Apparently taking water from elbow-depth vs. skimming near the top of the water allows for a more-accurate reading by helping to avoid surface contamination. I made sure the pump had been running for at least 30 minutes so that water and chemicals/organics were, in theory, well-blended throughout the pool. Now ready to test the sample I brought the test kit to my work area. I keep the test kit in the house in a cupboard so that the chemicals aren't exposed to heat for very long, except briefly during testing - I also make sure to test the sample water very soon after collected so as not to skew results due to evaporation, heat, light, etc.

STEP FOUR: Testing the water.

1) FAS/DPD (yellow instruction section and yellow-topped tubes) Checking 'Free Chlorine' and 'Combined Chlorine'
[Putting FAS-DPD To The Test]
[FAS-DPD Chlorine Test - Trouble Free Pool]
With the Taylor test kit instructions located right inside the lid of the test kit box it was very easy to go through the testing process. I began with the FAS-DPD test on the Taylor test kit instruction card's right-hand option of two choices, color-coded in yellow. As there are two options for how to test FAS-DPD I chose the 1 drop = 0.5ppm/10ml sample (supposedly not as precise as the 1 drop = 0.2ppm/25ml sample, but I later tested samples using both options and the results seemed to be about the same anyway).
On the first self-test of the pool's water I found that the Combined Chlorine number was unacceptable, it was well above zero which apparently means there was quite a bit of organic material in the pool being combined with the cleansing chlorine, and that was probably contributing to the strong chlorine smell on our skin plus stinging eyes (pH needed adjusting too, see later in this post)! The Free Chlorine result didn't seem too bad until I did the CYA (Cyanuric Acid/chlorine stabilizer) test later on - read on. I made sure to write down the CC number immediately after testing as it seems the color tends to go back to pink when the solution sits after testing, supposedly that's normal so no worries.

Of note, when I add liquid chlorine/bleach to the pool water I'm now adding it in the evening whenever possible, turning the pump on for about 30 minutes to help circulate the bleach through the water. I've read that adding bleach in the evening once the sun is setting (or later) allows the bleach to really do its work on organic matter through the night rather than evaporate throughout sunny daylight hours. This seems to have really helped slow down chlorine loss and I've noticed that the Combined Chlorine number is now about nil! Of course picking a time to add bleach depends on various factors, such as timing around pool "parties", weather conditions, organics in the pool water, balancing test results, etc. If the free chlorine number needs adjusting, "just do it!"

2) pH
Following the test kit instructions I next tested our pool's pH. I'll admit that using the visual scale on the test kit tube was a bit difficult for me to judge how pink/red the results really were, even holding the test tube up to "northern" light outside at eye level. Anyway, the result showed a number close to 8 on the pH scale. Since a high number indicates a very _base_ pH I used the Acid Demand bottle to see how much acid needed to be added to bring the sample down to a more-balanced pH, and this helped me be more confident that the pH reading I got was truly high on the base scale once I saw what it took acid-wise to lower the pH to 7.2 (just for testing purposes and to become more familiar with what the heck I was seeing/doing). The results meant I would need to add some acid to the pool to help bring the pH to a human skin number between 7.4 and 7.6. Muriatic acid to the rescue
[Pool School - raising/lowering pH: Recommended Pool Chemicals - Trouble Free Pool]. I'm going to give a pH meter a try (pH Meter), comparing it to Taylor test results, and if it seems the results are consistent between the two I'll likely just use the meter and avoid having to guess as to what shade of pink I'm seeing with the liquid test. This particular meter seems like it would be fairly easy to calibrate.

3 and 4) Total Alkalinity (TA) and Calcium Hardness (CH)
Again, following instructions in the test kit, I measured both these numbers. Our pool seemed OK on both counts, and great information in the POOL SCHOOL section on why these numbers are important and what to do if the numbers indicate problems

5) Cyanuric Acid (CYA)/Stabilizer
Here's where this pool's number had me doing a double-take. The test kit has you create a "cloudy" mixture that is then slowly poured into the testing tube that has a black dot on the bottom of the tube. You look down into the tube as you pour in the cloudy liquid, and stop once the black dot is no longer visible to your eyes. I did this test several times to make sure I wasn't being too confused by when the dot actually 'disappeared' from view. The results always ended up being around 90.
The pool guy who was managing the pool would drop chlorine tablets with stabilizer (a.k.a. hockey pucks) into the pool every week in a floating dispenser. What I've learned is that the CYA/stabilizer is intended to help prevent quick evaporation of the chlorine from the pool so that the chlorine can do its job as a disinfectant. Sunlight apparently sucks out chlorine from water like a giant solar sponge! The unfortunate fact about stabilizer is that it DOES NOT evaporate from the water, rather it builds up in the water over time and when the CYA number gets too high it actually prevents chlorine from being able to act on organic matter*. Taylor's test kit instructions (page 41) state that a minimum number for CYA is 10, ideal being 30-50, and 100 being a maximum number. TFP has a great Chlorine/CYA chart [Chlorine / CYA Chart - Trouble Free Pool] to help balance how much chlorine is needed in a pool to compensate for various CYA levels. However, TFP also recommends bringing the CYA number into the ideal range to best utilize chlorine, which means taking water out of the pool and replacing it with fresh water - no way to get around that, apparently. Lots of wonderful advice here on how to do this water exchange without risking a floating or damaged pool. I'll wait until I do the water exchange and get the CYA number in the 'normal' range before I do a SLAM (SLAM - Shock Level and Maintain - Trouble Free Pool) which should get rid of any residual Combined Chlorine issue as well. Note that CYA/stabilizers can affect water pH - lots of posts on TFP discussing this and how to make appropriate adjustments.
Be aware that the Taylor test kit has only a small amount of liquid testing material for CYA, if you're going to need to monitor/adjust your CYA you can order a 16oz. bottle of CYA testing reagent for a relatively cheap price online.

* You might be asking the same question I did regarding simply adding more water to the pool to "dilute" the CYA, without having to take water out. Someone pointed out to me that since the CYA doesn't evaporate per se, think of it like salt in ocean water. The water in the ocean will evaporate but the salt will only concentrate as the water dries up. Adding fresh water doesn't change the amount of salt in the water, you've got to take some salty water away and add fresh water to reduce the salt concentration. Same goes for CYA in the pool.

As this is not a salt water pool, that was it for using the test kit for now.

STEP FIVE: Adjust water as needed

See the TFP Pool School - Trouble Free Pool for specific help with necessary adjustments to your pool's water

STEP FIVE: Maintain

I've followed the Basic Pool Care Schedule - Trouble Free Pool recommended on this site, plus extra skimming/netting as needed

Knock wood, there doesn't appear to be algae growing in the pool so I'm going to do my best to keep the chemistry in line to maintain the pool well.

Here are some additional steps/ideas I took from reading TFP forums, and some of my own notes:

-- I checked out the number of hours that the pump was running (Determine Pump Run Time - Trouble Free Pool), and adjusted per guidelines here on TFP. I also learned from TFP how to determine what type of pump/filter I have, and approximate amount of pool gallons. I'm able to clean the filter as needed to keep the pump pressure in good stead (Routine Pump/Filter Maintenance - Trouble Free Pool). I've put 'checking the pump PSI' on my regular pool management schedule too.

-- I make sure to check out the strainer basket every day and empty as needed, and I skim off bugs/net foreign materials out of the water when I see them so the pool's chlorine has less organic matter to sanitize. I got a good pool scrub brush and long handle to scrub down the sides and bottom of pool regularly - no wonderful pool vac for me, not in my rental fee budget! When I rented the house I noticed brownish stains on the sides of the pool which when asked the pool guy attributed to "an old pool" and nothing to be done about it. However here in southern FL there is a lot of iron in our ground water, and I did the "vitamin C tablet" test (rubbed a vitamin C tablet on a brownish area) and the tablet did indeed rub off some of the brown coloring. I now have noted this and will see if the landlord wants to take on getting the pool walls cleaned.

-- I keep my testing reagents inside in a cupboard so they aren't exposed to heat/light except briefly while testing, and I have my test area prepared ahead of time (see above).

-- I plan to periodically do the OCLT [Overnight Free-Chlorine Loss Test Perform the Overnight FC Loss Test (OCLT) - Trouble Free Pool] to see how much and why the pool chlorine is being used. Though I've drained a bit of water while exchanging with fresh (city) water to help drop the pool's CYA number the CYA is still high so I want to be sure that added chlorine can do its job well. One day in the future there might be an empty-while-filling half of the pool's water to truly lower the CYA, it's up to the landlord so we'll see. It's relatively cheap to add chlorine as needed, and I bought a larger amount of FAS-DPD testing materials which should last a while even with more frequent testing. Not too expensive, and as it runs out I plan to buy when needed so as not to have old chemicals around that could potentially lose their effectiveness over time. Of note, I've been told that for our locale if you plan to add a lot of water to your pool you can call the water department, let them know what day you plan to do the fill, and they'll give a discounted water rate for that day. Worth asking, you never know?

-- I went ahead and bought the Taylor automatic stirrer unit for mixing testing reagents with water samples, and it's GREAT! It has the option to light up the stirring platform to help make the colors of the mixtures more visible when testing in less-than-sunlight conditions, and it is most definitely easier to use to keep the mixtures blended while adding drops of testing materials so as to be able to notice an 'end point' (final color change) when counting drops. Yes, to each his/her own, and this works very well for me.

-- As I wasn't having to deal with off numbers for TA and CH, or algae/cloudy water, etc. my routine is probably minimum for pool maintenance. I am keeping fresh chlorine on hand (read on TFP why you don't want to store chlorine for long, it loses its effectiveness), muriatic acid (away from other chemicals and read instructions for storage here on TFP, same for the bleach), and baking soda (large bags). Oh, NO MORE 'HOCKEY PUCKS' here, until the CYA number gets down to a low point, if ever. Most chlorine tablets ([Name]Chlor) have stabilizer as well, so be forewarned (see Chlorine Tablet Chemistry discussion here: Chlorine tablet chemistry). Mr. Rubber Ducky (my former chlorine tablet pool float) now stays on the porch where he will greet guests once "the bug" has gone away and friends/family can once again come to visit. [Of note, if you *do* use chlorine tablets and one of the cutesy solar-light tablet holders that light up at night, be forewarned - night-flying insects are greatly attracted to the light and a large number of them fall into the pool and drown, so if you don't want to have to frequently clean your skimmer/go netting for dead bugs, then opt for a non-solar-light dispenser!]

All in all I now spend maybe 5-10 minutes a day (or as needed) with pool cleaning and maintenance. Doing FAS-DPD testing or OCLT testing when needed adds another 10-15 minutes. The results: a swimmable pool without the chlorine smell and eye sting, yay!

So.... that's it from this Newbie. I wasn't sure at all that I wanted to become my own "pool guy" when I started this adventure but it took that miserable experience with stinky skin/stinging eyes and unanswered questions to/strange answers from the pool pro guy to set me down this path. I, again, give my thanks to all on TFP who provided personal advice, and have provided their years of expertise and experience here in written form and all geared toward the novice pool owner. I've learned a lot in a short time, with much more to go and know. TFP rocks!

PS: One excellent suggestion I read for helping keep Combined Chlorine (CC) numbers down and to need less chlorine additions is to take a shower BEFORE swimming, rinsing off dirt, sweat, soap, lotions, etc. that the chlorine has to work to eliminate from the pool water. It's very tempting to just jump in the pool after spending time in the hot muggy weather, but I'm adding the "shower before" step to my pool routine as well. It will be interesting to see if this has a positive overall effect on saving chemicals/reducing CC. Time will tell.
And for after-swim showers we bought some inexpensive suction-cup hooks and stuck them in the shower(s). Now when swimmers come in to take a shower and rinse off pool water they can take their wet swimsuits, rinse the swimsuits while in the shower, and hang the suits on the hooks to drip dry - works really well and shower rinsing gets most of the chlorine out of the swimsuits and ready for next use!
 
Last edited:

Newdude

Well-known member
Jun 16, 2019
4,512
NY
Copy and paste it whenever you see someone new and struggling to decide if this is the way for them. The above will sway many from being on the fence.
 
  • Like
Reactions: carnivalday

kimkats

Mod Squad
LifeTime Supporter
Jul 10, 2012
46,802
Tallahassee, FL
OH MY what a wonderful post!!! I am going to make this part of every newbie reading I find! Yes, yes, and yes some more to everything you wrote!!

Dude and Kathy, for now bookmark this post by clicking on the "tag" beside the post number. That will put it in your bookmarks.

Kim:kim:
 

mguzzy

Gold Supporter
Jul 8, 2015
2,336
OV, CA
That is an absolutely amazing post! What a journey. It should be on everyone's read list, perhaps its own article.
Be aware that the Taylor test kit has only a small amount of liquid testing material for CYA, if you're going to need to monitor/adjust your CYA you can order a 16oz. bottle of CYA testing reagent for a relatively cheap price online.
...
As this is a chlorine-based pool, not salt water, that was it for using the test kit for now.
That is why the TFTEST kits are so nice. they understand the proportions of reagents are different for doing test that support the TFP protocol. You get more of reagents you will test for (DPD and CYA tests) and less of what you don't use so much. And they sell refills.

A salt pool IS a chlorine pool. the difference is how the chlorine is added to the pool. And SWG generates chlorine from the salt, or you can dump in chlorine from another source (liquid, pucks etc.)

Well Done