Official 2019 BBQ, Smoking, Grilling, Baking and Beer thread

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Brentr

Brentr

Gold Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
Oct 18, 2009
2,585
Jacksonville, FL
I just picked up an air fryer and so far so good! What brand is yours Brent?
Cliff the air fryer I have is an Emerald 4L purchased from Best Buy for $35 on sale Black Friday. I purchased this as I did not know if I would use it much however I have a buddy who recommended it as he uses his every day for the kids making pizza bits, tater tots etc. It is very simple with 2 knobs, no fancy things and we love it so far. :cheers: Give it a try you would be amazed how fast it cooks everything and the smell is great. We have ours in the Flamingo Lounge so it does not smell up the house :cheers:
https://www.bestbuy.com/site/emerald-4l-analog-air-fryer-black/6317700.p?skuId=6317700
 

jimim

Bronze Supporter
Jun 20, 2016
1,852
NE/Pa
I will add I feel homemade French fries in an air frier r better than any other way. Same with wings. So much better any other way we have done them. That’s mostly what we use ours for.
 

jimim

Bronze Supporter
Jun 20, 2016
1,852
NE/Pa
Cliff the air fryer I have is an Emerald 4L purchased from Best Buy for $35 on sale Black Friday. I purchased this as I did not know if I would use it much however I have a buddy who recommended it as he uses his every day for the kids making pizza bits, tater tots etc. It is very simple with 2 knobs, no fancy things and we love it so far. :cheers: Give it a try you would be amazed how fast it cooks everything and the smell is great. We have ours in the Flamingo Lounge so it does not smell up the house :cheers:
https://www.bestbuy.com/site/emerald-4l-analog-air-fryer-black/6317700.p?skuId=6317700
That’s a great point about the smell Brent. We only used ours outside and now in the garage with a side door open in the winter. I never would have thought it would have given off as much steam from the top as it does. My wife doesn’t even want me to use it in the garage anymore. Keeping the side door open helps a lot I think.
 

jimim

Bronze Supporter
Jun 20, 2016
1,852
NE/Pa
Nothing fancy tonight. Pulled out the air fryer again for some wings and wine. They were having a special for this organic wine. Not bad. Made in a non oak barrel so doesn’t have the oaky taste. The wife likes it. Using one of her chick glasses she makes for people. Lol

I again stand behind wings in an air fryer vs a regular fryer. Just as good!

Jimi 9C38223D-AE17-47D2-B576-90BC010C473B.jpeg 2B18322B-59E7-426E-BF48-2509892D8C94.jpeg
 

JoyfulNoise

TFP Expert
Platinum Supporter
May 23, 2015
14,644
Tucson, AZ
Last edited:

JoyfulNoise

TFP Expert
Platinum Supporter
May 23, 2015
14,644
Tucson, AZ
Brent,

My brother worked in an Italian salumeria for over a decade and he’s the family expert in squishing meat into animal entrails. His take is that there isn’t a script to making sausage, it’s a very hands-on process that requires a lot of practice and quick reaction. He said the meat mixture absolutely has to be cold enough so that the fat component of the meat is like a soft playdoh texture. If the meat heats up at all where the fats start to lose their solidity, then it makes the process impossible. They even had one of their meat grinders in their walk in fridge so that everything stayed nice and cold. The casings need to be soaked so that they are pliable and easily stuffed. He said they would also lube up the casings with a little oil to help the ground up meat slide in easily from the insertion tube. Grinder speed is key as you have to push the meat in at a consistent rate but not so fast that you can’t tie off the sausage. So it’s best to load the casing onto the tube and then make sure that there’s only enough casing extended to make a sausage link at a time. You basically want the grinder to create the “meat pressure” and do all the work to “inflate” the casing and then tie/twist off quickly before the casing pops.

I’ve seen him do it first hand and it really is artistry at work. The “old man” (Carmine who owned the store his entire life was like 85 years old at the time) could make an entire length of sausages in minutes and keep the process going like a machine....all the while cursing at all his employees in Italian to go do something useful...
 
OP
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Brentr

Brentr

Gold Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
Oct 18, 2009
2,585
Jacksonville, FL
Brent,

My brother worked in an Italian salumeria for over a decade and he’s the family expert in squishing meat into animal entrails. His take is that there isn’t a script to making sausage, it’s a very hands-on process that requires a lot of practice and quick reaction. He said the meat mixture absolutely has to be cold enough so that the fat component of the meat is like a soft playdoh texture. If the meat heats up at all where the fats start to lose their solidity, then it makes the process impossible. They even had one of their meat grinders in their walk in fridge so that everything stayed nice and cold. The casings need to be soaked so that they are pliable and easily stuffed. He said they would also lube up the casings with a little oil to help the ground up meat slide in easily from the insertion tube. Grinder speed is key as you have to push the meat in at a consistent rate but not so fast that you can’t tie off the sausage. So it’s best to load the casing onto the tube and then make sure that there’s only enough casing extended to make a sausage link at a time. You basically want the grinder to create the “meat pressure” and do all the work to “inflate” the casing and then tie/twist off quickly before the casing pops.

I’ve seen him do it first hand and it really is artistry at work. The “old man” (Carmine who owned the store his entire life was like 85 years old at the time) could make an entire length of sausages in minutes and keep the process going like a machine....all the while cursing at all his employees in Italian to go do something useful...
All great tips Matt, I did some research and I ground up the meat first and then tried to fill in the casings by passing the ground meat mixture into the the meat stuffer. I wonder if I should have grind and stuff at the same time. Hope I explained this properly. :cheers:
 

JoyfulNoise

TFP Expert
Platinum Supporter
May 23, 2015
14,644
Tucson, AZ
I would suggest you do a NY shell steak. We used to do blackened steak on the hot grill top in my restaurant days. You slather the shell steak with clarified butter, season both sides with blackening spice (you can find it in the store or make your own) and then sear each side at high temp. Then you finish off the steaks in a warm oven until they reach the desired internal temp.

It’s hard to cook thick steaks on a flat top because you’ll mostly just wind up searing/burning the outer layer and the interior will remain raw. Grills work better because you can get the marks on the surface and then let steaks “roast” from the indirect heat on the cool side of the grill.