My New Old Pool Dig Out

cboeger1974

Active member
Jun 2, 2020
26
St. Louis missouri
Dustless glass blasting completed on the shell today. Guy said it was one of the hardest shells he has ever worked on. Said normally small pieces of concrete and stone come off with the paint removal on normal shells - not on this one. Doesn't appear to be any major cracks. Some slight surface cracking but nothing that appears to be all the way through the shell. He blasted the top of the shell as well to remove any loose concrete. I will go through and continue with a rock hammer to remove any additional loose pieces. Now for some plumbing work.
I'm guessing that sika stuff is pricey. The concrete you have now is 4000 max. Cheapest easiest way is bonding agent and forms after epoxy pinning rebar or even a small cage if needed. You could do a delivery if there is site access. Otherwise grab pallets and run them back with a skidsteer to a 2 bag mixer. If you add a littlen plasticizer to 5k bagged mix amd use no more than specified water yiu have very strong concrete.......and its cheap
JimmytheGreek I have a question that I know you cannot guarantee or give an 100% accurate answer because there are a lot a variables at play. Lets assume that I complete the cleanup and removal of loose concrete perfectly (I am trying my best) and the conditions are optimal and I use the Sika concrete product or a modified cement product similar to that - what do you think the longevity of the repair will be? I don't want to do this again in 5 years. If its a 20 year repair that would make me feel much better about the work I am putting into this. If its 10 years I may consider reshooting the walls on this pool building a rebar cage inside of the existing walls. In 5 years I will be in my 50's and don't know if the body can take this kind of harsh abuse again. 8 hours of swinging a rock hammer hurts pretty bad the next day.
 

jimmythegreek

TFP Expert
Bronze Supporter
In The Industry
Aug 10, 2017
2,415
Morris Cnty NJ
Honestly if it were mine I would form it and pour it in one shot with the best mix the plant can send me. I'd look around for a spec mix. My supplier can fortify standard mixes, a 5000psi with some good additives is strong stuff, stronger than what you have there now. I'd spend my time epoxy pinning the heck out of it and making sure it's really nice. Bigger plants have engineering reps that know their concrete amd often have good suggestions and advice, they do it all day long. I dont know how much mud you need but if its alot that sika is pricey. Where are you at with this? Dont swing a rock hammer use an air chisel or a chipping gun.....dont kill yourself over a few bucks
 

cboeger1974

Active member
Jun 2, 2020
26
St. Louis missouri
Honestly if it were mine I would form it and pour it in one shot with the best mix the plant can send me. I'd look around for a spec mix. My supplier can fortify standard mixes, a 5000psi with some good additives is strong stuff, stronger than what you have there now. I'd spend my time epoxy pinning the heck out of it and making sure it's really nice. Bigger plants have engineering reps that know their concrete amd often have good suggestions and advice, they do it all day long. I dont know how much mud you need but if its alot that sika is pricey. Where are you at with this? Dont swing a rock hammer use an air chisel or a chipping gun.....dont kill yourself over a few bucks
How long do you think the repair could last?
What can I do to prevent water from seeping through the joint. I was told a water stop would cause a concrete failure. Is there a waterproofing that I can put on it to prevent water seeping?
I pretty much have all loose concrete removed - I will take some pics and send them today hopefully if the rain holds off. (used my masons hammer to tap on the concrete and anywhere there was a pitch change came out).
I was planning to do plumbing and lighting next (need to set 2 skimmer boxes maybe 3. 4 returns plus a vacuum line. And the new main drain which will be the most difficult plumbing portion). I will need to cut the rebar out in order to put the skimmers in and then bend bar around the back of the skimmers to tie it all together.
Next will be concrete work and I am guessing 2 pallets max of sika - I don't mind using the best product out there and spending up to $3-4k on that stuff if it makes this last longer. In the grand schemes of things that is nothing compared to the whole build with new equipment, landscaping, etc.
Honestly after concrete bond beam repairs and plumbing the rest is easy - coping and decking.
And yes, what started as a simple experiment with the mason's hammer ended up being all day - I just gave away my air hammer but I will be headed to the depot today to pick up another one as they are really inexpensive vs. my aching hands right now.
 
Last edited:

vermaraj

Well-known member
Jul 6, 2015
81
Long Island City, NY
Bond beam area looks like bucket strikes from backhoe. Possible they hit shell with teeth then scraped up to remove coping. From the pictures looks like 2-3' level strike (teeth) then breakage up or down. Maybe they contemplated destroying shell and made few sample strikes.

Not that it matters to your solution, but it does indicate wall was solid before demo.
 

jimmythegreek

TFP Expert
Bronze Supporter
In The Industry
Aug 10, 2017
2,415
Morris Cnty NJ
That's alot better looking than I expected. I think you will be fine forming it and pouring it. I dont do many concrete pools in this area. What I would do is pin it like crazy and tie into the existing shell cage the best you can. You can also peg it if you have the room. You use a 3 to 4 inch coring bit and make a 6" deep hole then drill the inside with a 1" plus bit and whack it out. Keeps it from ever sliding in the future. Remember with proper prep you get a good bomd to old concrete. Many a bridge and structural concrete is patched. You could also dig the back up and make a lollipop form and epoxy pin to the back of existing shell amd tie it in there too for a thicker stronger top. Many ways to skin this cat. Remember when epoxy is pinned its stronger than the original rebar. Once tied the new stuff cant move forward without moving up as well. Never gonna happen with epoxy pins.....good luck getting them out
On my builds the pool is the easy part. Coping and decking are finish work that you cant hide, I think that's the hardest part....doesmt help when your a perfectionist