My New Old Pool Dig Out

cboeger1974

Active member
Jun 2, 2020
26
St. Louis missouri
Is there a bond beam on the shallow end or has it been knocked out?
The bond beam appears to be in tact all the way around the pool. Some of the rebar is exposed but I’m guessing that was the construction method used - perhaps the shell was shot to top of rebar. Then the deck was a single pour cantelivered over the shell. There are many mysteries still as to why it was filled in the first place as the shell still seems to be in good shape overall. I do know the previous owner was in his mid 90’s and took a reverse mortgage out. The lender told him to either get the pool in running order or fill it in. Considering the actual trash and other items including large trees trunks etc that were in the pool it may have been cheaper if there was filtration or main drain issues to simply fill it in - and don’t forget they didn’t comply w the local requirements when filling it in as there really was no drainage holes punched in the bottom. Not sure even if the main drain hole goes all the way through the shell.
 

cboeger1974

Active member
Jun 2, 2020
26
St. Louis missouri
Well I completed the power washing task today. Looking for advice on ways to fix bond beam. It appears to be a poured pool not gunite. There are large 3/4’ river rock in the mix. From what I understand gunite does not have stone in it. I may be completely wrong though.

363E8036-4630-4F57-8C79-EDE1AE7DDDD2.jpeg5007A84F-6440-4A0A-A1E6-04123A3A44E7.jpeg675C408E-A7AA-4CA2-B739-801580ED6033.jpeg867FFE1F-4E93-4C71-90DF-86A6527FA9D6.jpeg
 
  • Like
Reactions: Apsuhead

PoolGate

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jun 7, 2017
4,678
Damascus, MD
That shell is in really bad shape. I suppose you could rebuild it but I think you are going to have to use it with a liner I don't see that ever being a plaster pool again. Not that it can't be salvaged but no builder would ever attempt it they'd demo it and start from scratch. Be interesting to watch though!
 

cboeger1974

Active member
Jun 2, 2020
26
St. Louis missouri
That shell is in really bad shape. I suppose you could rebuild it but I think you are going to have to use it with a liner I don't see that ever being a plaster pool again. Not that it can't be salvaged but no builder would ever attempt it they'd demo it and start from scratch. Be interesting to watch though!
That is not what I was hoping for. Only the top 1’ or so appears to be in bad shape. The rest of it doesn’t have a crack in it.
 

PoolGate

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jun 7, 2017
4,678
Damascus, MD
That is not what I was hoping for. Only the top 1’ or so appears to be in bad shape. The rest of it doesn’t have a crack in it.
Sorry don't misunderstand I am not poo pooing your idea I am always happy to see a buried pool resurrection project. I do think you'll need to liner this pool though.
 

kimkats

Mod Squad
LifeTime Supporter
Jul 10, 2012
45,422
Tallahassee, FL
@jimmythegreek @ajw22 any help and input..........Allen can you find that pool where that fella just did this kind of thing with the bond beam? I can't find it :(

Anything can be done with time, effort, and money. It can be fixed to hold water...........just need to find the best kind of pool it will end up being!
 

Newdude

Well-known member
Jun 16, 2019
3,065
NY
We got acrylic steps for the dogs. My big guy was 2 inches shorter than a great dane and he couldn't touch in the shallow end. I confirmed with snorkle goggles a few dozen times.
 

jimmythegreek

TFP Expert
Bronze Supporter
In The Industry
Aug 10, 2017
2,415
Morris Cnty NJ
It would be alot cheaper to liner this pool in the bigger picture. With these older poured pools you have to take care to inspect the floor to wall transition they often poured the floor first and then the walls. If you definitely want to repair the bond beam amd start the process of a rehab take some time and fix the grade around the pool. Get rid of the dirt above the pool height amd make a swale so all rain washes away from pool. Free up the backside so you have plenty of room to work on making forms amd be able to keep it clean. I read you have concrete experience so you already know how important clean concrete is and what to do with bonding agents. Your going to have to plumb the pool so if you have access to a mini excavator that's the ticket. Post any questions you have I'll guide you along
 

cboeger1974

Active member
Jun 2, 2020
26
St. Louis missouri
It would be alot cheaper to liner this pool in the bigger picture. With these older poured pools you have to take care to inspect the floor to wall transition they often poured the floor first and then the walls. If you definitely want to repair the bond beam amd start the process of a rehab take some time and fix the grade around the pool. Get rid of the dirt above the pool height amd make a swale so all rain washes away from pool. Free up the backside so you have plenty of room to work on making forms amd be able to keep it clean. I read you have concrete experience so you already know how important clean concrete is and what to do with bonding agents. Your going to have to plumb the pool so if you have access to a mini excavator that's the ticket. Post any questions you have I'll guide you along
Thanks for the reply. The floor to wall transition seems very tight with no gaps or cracking present. I plan to dig around the pool this weekend approx. 30" deep in preparation for plumbing work. I am on a pretty decent hillside so keeping water out of the dig will be very difficult plus the hill on the lower side of the pool leads to a neighbor who has already complained in the past about mud runoff during a previous project so I am doing everything possible to avoid any issues. I am hoping if that dig around the pool (30" deep) fills with water it won't create an issue with the pool "floating" - it is a 12" thick pool and it has a hole in bottom where the drain was (which is actually still holding a little bit of water from the power washing this weekend. I think the clay around the pool is preventing any drainage. Getting the shell core drilled for new plumbing will be an easy task - I do business with a company that core drills for a living. And clean concrete is a must, but bonding of structural concrete for pools is way out of my league - my experience lies in flatwork. What type of concrete and bonding agent should i use? I don't have much help on the weekends other than my 15 year old son - most of my union field workers have had enough fun by Friday afternoon (60-70 hours) and no amount of money can entice them to work on Saturday. Is this something that can be done in small 20' sections. I imagine that a 20' section would possibly be manageable for a father / son team. I can definetely get all of the shell prepped and rebar repaired / replaced on the whole thing - but actual concrete work in sections. I would also need some guidance on skimmer install as it did not have them before (only a main drain in deep end). It seems that skimmers would interfere with the existing rebar in the bond beam. Do you cut that rebar and then run new rebar around the skimmers and then tie it all in together? Lot of questions and I still have a long way to go before I am ready for concrete work.

I did meet with a pool rehabber yesterday and he said he couldn't get to it till next year. That was a big downfall. I was looking at a back up plan if I didn't think I was up to the task. He did mention 4 skimmers on a pool of that size so I at least know how many I need now. I know I can do it, simply a matter of time and help. I would love to teach my son the value of hard work - and the reward for doing so. Thoughts?
 

cboeger1974

Active member
Jun 2, 2020
26
St. Louis missouri
Cool old house. Sure would like to see a few pics of that restoration. :goodjob:
I love showing off the house. It was built in 1929 next door to a place called Grants Farm (a Anheuser Busch nature preserve) which was the home of the Busch Family (Anheuser Busch). It is a small neighborhood of homes sitting on 1 acre lots just outside city limits of St Louis. The homes were built for friends, executives, and business associates of Adolphus Busch. I bought if from the Gregory Estate - he was approx. 93 when he passed away and he had neglected the home for several years. The kitchen at the time didn't have a stove in it, had a hole in the floor the size of a basketball and an electrical system that amazed even the seasoned veteran. I passed my plumbing and electrical homeowners license requirements at the county and completed all of the work on this inside. Not one original wire is left in the home. All new plastic and copper throughout - even under the basement floors. I took out load bearing walls - there are 6 steel beams in the house - the largest is 8" x 10" x 18' long weighing in at something around 600 lbs holding up the 2nd floor above the kitchen. You can see from one side of the house all the way to the other side. Not sure if I said it before but my 4th full rehab, lots of hard work and I have been able to roll the profits from each one to upsize - I couldn't afford to buy something like this. I bought the house in October and we moved in January - still in rough shape but better than the in laws basement. There are two kitchens in the house and two laundry rooms - main floor and basement. Best part of the house - I can walk to Grants Farm - about 400 yards and ride the tram to get 2 free beers daily if I want and maybe sneak a few extra free ones!

4 season room.JPG 4 season Room

yard reno.JPG yard after honeysuckle was removed
main kitchen.JPGmainfloor kitchenbasement kitchen.JPGbasement kitchen
kitchen 2.JPGmainfloor kitchen island
rehab 1.JPGrehab 3.JPG rehab in progress
 

jimmythegreek

TFP Expert
Bronze Supporter
In The Industry
Aug 10, 2017
2,415
Morris Cnty NJ
How big is the pool roughly? Theres mo need for 4 skimmers usually 2 is common a 3rd maybe on a huge pool.
For runoff get silt fence amd set it up the right way dug in with a pick or cover the bottom flap with dirt. If you got access to cheap haybales nearby they are best. If you can do flat work you can do this. Its fine to do small sections. Get some structural bonding epoxy and a hammer drill and pin it every foot max or equal to what was there. The old days 12x12 was common for everything on rebar grids. Chip and clean out anything that's loose or doeant look good. Make some primitive forms out of anything lying around amd paint brush on some binding agent before you pour it. I can't stress enough clean concrete. Like washed amd blown with a compressor or vacuumed dust is your enemy when bonding old amd new. An electric mixer is great for these jobs you can bang out 80 pounders fast. 5000 mix off the shelf is good for repairs and stronger than whats there. The skimmers are tricky but doable. Also dont fuss too much on transition from old to new being flush the plasterer will fudge variations so close is good enough in this application.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Wobblerlorri