Jandy Valve leaks and Union Leak

John2500

Member
Jul 8, 2018
14
Fayetteville, NC
I have a couple problems in my pool pump room and I'm looking for advice on plumbing solutions.

The pump room is located in a half-basement (4 steps below the grade of the in-ground pool deck) inside a pool house building. In the photo you will see the three intake lines from the skimmers, main drain, and vacuum port all coming through the base of the foundation wall, flowing from left to right. The fourth line, at the top, is the return line, also with a Jandy valve. There is a fifth line, barely visible at the bottom of the photo which I capped off. It was a drain line coming from a floor drain in the patio and it flooded the basement every time it rained! I'm not sure why it was there. Each of the lines has a Jandy valve on it.

The lines are 2" PVC lines. At least one of the Jandy valves leaks when it is turned off. They are set up inconsistently, in that some are off when the handle is perpendicular to the flow and some are off when the handle is parallel to the flow. You can see a couple are missing the screws that hold the handles on. Additionally, when I close the valves, water still comes through. With respect to the valves, my question is, can I purchase a rebuild kit and rebuild them without having to cut the PVC and put in new ones? Can anyone recommend an online source for parts that might be able to assist me in confirming the model number from the photos? If I rebuild them, how to I keep the water from flowing while I disassemble them (the pool surface elevation is well above the elevation of the valves)? Is there a way to plug the main drain & skimmers?

In the photo you will also see that the intake lines are tied together and then come into one 2" line that goes into a threaded union and then to one PVC line that is reduced to 1 1/2" and enters my Hayward 1HP pump. The threaded union is leaking. As you can see, I don't have much PVC to work with to replace it. I tried Flex Tape but that didn't stop the leak. I wanted to try and loosen it up a bit, to see if I could put some teflon tape on the threads, but I cannot find a pipe wrench or adjustable wrench big enough (the collar is about 5-6" wide). I tried a strap wrench tonight, but with no luck. While doing that, I also noticed that the force I was exerting to try and loosen the union was putting too much pressure on the rest of the plumbing and causing it to move. Can anyone suggestion a short term or long term solution to stop the dripping? It is probably about a gallon per day or more, which is enough to keep the room damp. I have new electrical boxes in the room, so I need to stop the leaking.

Finally, if I don't tackle this myself, should I look for a pool company or a plumber? I've shown it to a couple of plumbers and they don't seem interested in doing the work. I have not found any reliable pool folks in my area yet.



112807
 

ajw22

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jul 21, 2013
9,885
Northern NJ
You have the standard grey Jandy valves, not the NeverLubes. Parts are at...


Put a plug (or potato) in the skimmer or return before you work on a valve.


@jimmythegreek @kadavis @Pool_Medic you have ideas on tackling the pump union?
 
Last edited:

kadavis

TFP Guide
In The Industry
Apr 5, 2015
1,576
tucson, arizona
If you don't have access to a large pair of channel locks, or pipe wrench you may have to call a professional. Problem with these unions is finding right size o rings
 

JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
16,388
It's cheaper to buy the whole valve.

Remove the screws and pull out the whole assembly with everything except the body and install it in the old body. Neverlube will fit the grey body.

The wide part of the handle should say off or closed and should mirror the gate inside the valve.


Use the new screws. When reinstalling the screws, it's important to not crossthread the screws. Slowly rotate the screw counterclockwise until you feel it drop into the original threads and then rotate clockwise.

For the union, two pairs of big Channellock pliers will work. One for the nut and one for the other part of the union to hold it steady. The key is not to squeeze the nut so hard that it deforms out of round. Only squeeze hard enough to get a bite on the nut. Available at Home Depot or Lowe's.

 
Last edited:

John2500

Member
Jul 8, 2018
14
Fayetteville, NC
It's cheaper to buy the whole valve.
Ok, so you are saying I should just order a new valve (complete), leave the old body in place, and put all the new guts in? That makes sense. The link you sent shows a black valve (rather than gray). Is that just the way the make them now? I'd like to make sure I've got correct model number.
 

JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
16,388
The link is the Neverlube valve. The parts should work in your valve body. If there is something wrong with the existing valve body, you can replace the entire valve.
 

John2500

Member
Jul 8, 2018
14
Fayetteville, NC
Put a plug (or potato) in the skimmer or return before you work on a valve.
Thanks. The plug you mentioned looks like it will work in my skimmers (I think it is a Hayward). However, what about the main drain? I think I'll need to block it off as well since the water surface in the pool is a few feet above the elevation of the valves. I have what I think is known as a modern or "safety" main drain... it has two drains (presumably tied in together under the bottom of the pool). Each one has a screen that is screwed on to the top. I can take a photo if that helps.
 

Pool_Medic

In The Industry
Apr 1, 2018
1,077
Bangor Maine
Careful with channel locks on that union, they bust pretty easy...don’t ask me how I know lol

Clean the threads, put in a new o ring, lube and hand tightening should stop the leak. If that doesn’t work, use channel locks but pretty please do not reef on it.
 

duraleigh

Admin
Mod Squad
TFP Expert
Platinum Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
In The Industry
Apr 1, 2007
32,768
Sebring, Florida
If that doesn’t work, use channel locks but pretty please do not reef on it.
A BIG plus one!! I am not sure if "reef" is a colloquial word or a typo, but I know what pool_medic is saying........Don't crank down on it! They will break.
 

ajw22

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jul 21, 2013
9,885
Northern NJ
Not sure how to plug the main drain other then to scuba down, unscrew the cover plates, and put plugs in the holes.

If the valves were outdoors I think pool guys would just work quickly around the water flowing out and get the new valve in.

It annoys me that plumbers don’t think years ahead as to how things will be maintained. There should be a valve to shutoff skimmer water-flow before that manifold.
 

John2500

Member
Jul 8, 2018
14
Fayetteville, NC
Not sure how to plug the main drain other then to scuba down, unscrew the cover plates, and put plugs in the holes.
Actually, my pool was rebuilt and they brought the bottom up, so the deep end is only about 5 1/2 feet at the drains. I've cleared out pebbles before, so I can probably just put on a mask and undo a screw at a time if needed to get the covers off. I guess my question is, would you expect that the plugs would fit whatever pipe is under the covers? I can't really see what it looks like under there. I assume it must neck down to a pipe that is 1 or 2 inches in diameter.
 

ajw22

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jul 21, 2013
9,885
Northern NJ
The tapered winterizing plugs should fit whatever size you find.

This video will give you an idea what you may find under the cover.