I can't figure out what is wrong, and the pool people haven't been helpful at all :(

Strawberryshortcake

Bronze Supporter
Apr 22, 2019
250
Hot Springs, Ar
Somebody here shared this but your husband might get a laugh out of it

?

Are you making sure that the pump basket is installed correctly?

Check the impeller for debris.
Yes. I have also checked the impeller. We (mostly my dad, who is much more knowledgeable) actually opened the pump up to check the impeller when the basket wasn't holding proper water level. And I recently checked it again, with a clothes hanger wire.. nothing in there.
 

Strawberryshortcake

Bronze Supporter
Apr 22, 2019
250
Hot Springs, Ar
Just an update...
As mentioned we had a lot of rain again yesterday. It rained all day.
Today, my system is running like a champ. Everything looks exactly like it should. There is not a single bubble in my pump basket, it almost looks as if there is no water in there (there is!) I haven't had any of the weird slow downs.
So it seems after periods of heavy rain, my issues "fix themselves"...
I don't really know what to make of it.
As for slamming... I don't think I'm going to try that right now unless we really think that could be it. Here is my water today
And I preformed an overnight loss test, it was 3.5 when I went to bed and 3.5 when I woke up. No CCs. The water is crystal clear and sparkling. (it would be even better if I treated the iron stains again :hammer: )
IMG_3166.jpg
I will see how things go the further we get away from the rainfall...
I haven't done any of the other suggestions given here (cleaning the sand etc) because I don't want to mess with it while it's working lol.
 

markayash

Gold Supporter
Mar 21, 2016
1,812
Marrietta Ga
Did you try running a hose over the valve by the pump yet. If that didn’t make a difference wonder if a pipe is cracked under ground and rain pooling around it? Just thinking out loud .
 

mguzzy

Gold Supporter
Jul 8, 2015
1,671
OV, CA
I was thinking the same thing... see if you can recreate the situation with a hose. Try flooding areas around your pump and pool systematically and see if you can narrow down the possible locations. It really sounds like a suction side leak that is getting sealed when things are wet.. just thinking out loud as as well.
 

Strawberryshortcake

Bronze Supporter
Apr 22, 2019
250
Hot Springs, Ar
Just another update.
Yesterday it got really hot and sunny so the ground was drying out quick and my pump was showing air bubbles again.
Today, it rained a ton, which fixed it again.
It's going to be raining even more tonight and my pool got so full (above the skimmer) from today's rain that I had to go backwash. I just backwashed Sunday, and the water was clean.
This time, what came out of the backwash pipe looked like pure mud! For quiet a bit. There is absolutely nothing in the pool that is causing that, the water is crystal clear.
I think this probably confirms what has been mentioned... likely a cracked pipe underground that is sealing when it rains, and also sucking mud/dirt in, which is causing the slow downs.

I guess I need to start by slowly digging the line out, and hope it's not the section under the concrete?
 
  • Like
Reactions: markayash

JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
19,255
Put about 10 psi of air pressure on the line and I suspect that you will be able to locate the leak fairly quickly by listening for bubbles.
 
  • Like
Reactions: markayash

markayash

Gold Supporter
Mar 21, 2016
1,812
Marrietta Ga
Just another update.
Yesterday it got really hot and sunny so the ground was drying out quick and my pump was showing air bubbles again.
Today, it rained a ton, which fixed it again.
It's going to be raining even more tonight and my pool got so full (above the skimmer) from today's rain that I had to go backwash. I just backwashed Sunday, and the water was clean.
This time, what came out of the backwash pipe looked like pure mud! For quiet a bit. There is absolutely nothing in the pool that is causing that, the water is crystal clear.
I think this probably confirms what has been mentioned... likely a cracked pipe underground that is sealing when it rains, and also sucking mud/dirt in, which is causing the slow downs.

I guess I need to start by slowly digging the line out, and hope it's not the section under the concrete?
You can buy a camera off amazon that hooked to your phone. Not sure if it would help
 

RDspaguy

In The Industry
Mar 21, 2020
699
Cabool, Mo
Glad you all caught up. It was getting lonely.
James is right, if you can buy or put together a pressure test rig and have a compressor you will probably hear it bubble underground. You might even see a little spring appear in your yard. Could save you a whole bunch of digging.
A scope or cable camera could do the trick also, just make sure it is waterproof.
 

Strawberryshortcake

Bronze Supporter
Apr 22, 2019
250
Hot Springs, Ar
Could I have some more explanation on pressure testing? I have a small air compressor that I think can do 100 PSI, but I have no idea where to start.

Also, as mentioned previously I think that I have two suction lines. One to the skimmer and one to what I think was a vacuum hookup. This pipe




This pipe is the shortest distant to the pump
I would like to maybe see if I can isolate this pipe or the skimmer line. I know if I close this pipe, the system gets plenty of water, but I have never tried closing the skimmer and just having this one on because I wasn't sure it would be okay. Would that be okay to try? Would I just watch the pump to make sure it isn't starved of water?
 

JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
19,255
Mostly you just need to plug the suction lines and rig up a way to push air into the lines from the pump end and then listen to the ground at the skimmer to see if you can hear bubbles.

Don't put more than 10 psi on the line.
 

RDspaguy

In The Industry
Mar 21, 2020
699
Cabool, Mo
Try it out. Anything you can do to narrow it down now means less digging later. I am not a fan of digging, so like to know before I get out the shovel.
This connected to your compressor with a winter plug in the other end of the pipe should do the trick. Do not go over 10psi.
 

chiefwej

LifeTime Supporter
TFP Guide
Jun 12, 2011
3,474
Tucson
When looking for a suction side air leak, plastic food wrap is one valuable tool. It allows you to wrap one fitting or even a valve to see if that is source of leak.
 
  • Like
Reactions: markayash

markayash

Gold Supporter
Mar 21, 2016
1,812
Marrietta Ga
Could I have some more explanation on pressure testing? I have a small air compressor that I think can do 100 PSI, but I have no idea where to start.

Also, as mentioned previously I think that I have two suction lines. One to the skimmer and one to what I think was a vacuum hookup. This pipe




This pipe is the shortest distant to the pump
I would like to maybe see if I can isolate this pipe or the skimmer line. I know if I close this pipe, the system gets plenty of water, but I have never tried closing the skimmer and just having this one on because I wasn't sure it would be okay. Would that be okay to try? Would I just watch the pump to make sure it isn't starved of water?
I see your frog log, I have one also :)