High CYA

Feb 20, 2018
3
Austin
#1
Just had a new pool heater installed last month after the original gave out (only use it to heat the spa) - got our money's worth we have been told.

To get the most of out of the new one, we were told to keep the pH in check and also the chlorine. After getting red readings on the chlorine level, I took a sample in and got the results. FAC 10; TAC 10; Calcium Hardness 250; CYA 150; TA 110 and pH 7.2

Several years ago, we drained approx. 1/3 of the water to repair some spots where rebar was showing through the gunite and to repair some of the tile work. The CYA was better after that but I started having trouble with mustard algae a few summers ago. Used PhosFree the last two summers on a weekly basis and it did keep the mustard algae down to a minimum. I have always used the 3" chlorine tablets but after reading on the forum - I will switch to liquid chlorine or liquid bleach in the future!

My question - the pool math says I need to drain 73% of my water to get the CYA down!!! That will cost me a fortune with the utility company - is there any other way? Will it hurt the heater if I do it gradually instead?? We have had NO sunshine here lately but it is Texas, so that will change shortly. I know that would be a really slow process but is it the only answer? I read some good (but mostly poor) ratings on Bio-Active, so not sure that is a solution either!

Did using the PhosFree cause this or just the 3" tablets over the life of the pool? The water is crystal clear and has never been green or cloudy
 

Jimrahbe

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Jul 7, 2014
10,884
Bedford, TX
#2
Lynn,

I live in the DFW area and it would only cost me about $50 bucks to fill up my 17000 gallon pool... I'd be surprised if your water rate is that much different than mine... :confused:

If you contact your city in advance, most will allow you to fill the pool and not charge you the associated sewer fees...

I'd make sure what the real cost will be before deciding not to drain the pool.

Instead of buying "Bio-Active" just send TFP the money.. at least we can put it to good use and your pool won't know the difference, since it does not work 99% of the time.

Overuse of 3" chlorinated tablets is the primary reason most people find this web site...

In my opinion, the best way to chlorinate a pool is with a Saltwater Chlorine Generator. I will never, ever, own a non-saltwater pool again... My pool is almost 4 years old and I have never had algae, never added a single bag of Pool $tore shock, never added PhosFree or any other magical chemical sold by the pool store..

The key to proper pool maintenance is to maintain your FC and CYA per this chart... [FC/CYA][/FC/CYA] And to have the ability to test your own pool water so that you get accurate and timely results.

Thanks for posting,

Jim R.
 
OP
OP
L
Feb 20, 2018
3
Austin
#3
Has your pool always been a saltwater chlorine generator pool or did you convert from the regular chlorine - I honestly have no knowledge of a saltwater pool???
 

Texas Splash

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
#4
Lynn, unlike Jim, I'm still old-school - manually adding chlorine (bleach) every day or so. Maybe one day I'll upgrade to a SWG, but for now I keep a couple gallons of HEB's Bravo (regular) bleach on-hand and it also works well with NO CYA side effects. Definitely remove the pucks as Jim noted, and above all else .... test your own water! It's easy and much more reliable and convenient. Don't let the "free testing" real you in. Learn from our lessons now. I recommend getting a TF-100 (link below) but a Taylor K-2006C will also work. Don't forget to include a magnetic speedstir as it is extremely helpful when mixing the reagents. :stirpot: Great to have you with us.
 

Jimrahbe

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Jul 7, 2014
10,884
Bedford, TX
#5
Lynn,

The pool at my house started out life as a Saltwater pool... But I have two rent houses that were normal pools that I converted over to the Saltwater system.. It is very easy...

The difference between a Saltwater pool and a non-saltwater pool is not much...

With a non-saltwater pool, you have to add chlorine to the water.. Most people do this by using 3" chlorinated tablets.. Some TFP followers add Liquid Chlorine or Bleach manually...
You normally buy your tablets or Liquid chlorine every few months or so...

With a saltwater pool, the pool water is run through a Saltwater Chlorine Generator (SWCG) which coverts the saltwater into chlorine... The main disadvantage of a SWCG is cost.. Both a Saltwater pool and an non-saltwater pool cost about the same to run, but with a SWCG you are buying the 'chlorine' up front..

Thanks,

Jim R.