Am I doing it right?

MiguelACA

Silver Supporter
May 12, 2020
78
Houston
It's not ideal, but might be the best option for me at this time. The autodrain dumps the water out about as fast as it takes it in, maybe a bit slower. I'll give it a go. It's the most convenient way to do it. If I had a pump, id drain some water out and fill, but I don't have one. At least I don't have to babysit the hose running lol

Miguel,

It would work but take a lot more water..

Thanks,

Jim R.
 
Last edited:

MiguelACA

Silver Supporter
May 12, 2020
78
Houston
I could also hook up a hose to my pump and drain it through there? Then top off whatever was drained. Would have to keep a close eye on it so the water doesn't drop below the skimmer?
 

MiguelACA

Silver Supporter
May 12, 2020
78
Houston
I haven't been running the heat pump, so the pool water has been in the mid 70's with the cooler weather. I'd have to check the fill water once I get home. I saw mention of pool temps in another post about draining and CYA. What do the temps matter?

What is the temperature of your fill water versus your pool water?
 

mknauss

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
Bronze Supporter
May 3, 2014
33,337
Laughlin, NV
The colder water will separate at the bottom of the pool. So if fill water is colder, putting the hose in the deep end and letting the pool go to overflow will work. If the fill water is warmer, that will not work. Disable your pool pump during this process.
 

mgtfp

Bronze Supporter
Mar 5, 2020
488
Melbourne, Australia
I noticed that my pH was climbing fast and hard after I switched to liquid chlorine. I figured that CYA from the tablets had been keeping it in check from rising too much too fast? I also read that liquid chlorine should not raise pH? Then I read that keeping my TA high could contribute to high pH and vice versa.
Adding liquid chlorine raises pH, but "using" chlorine (for killing germs, oxidising "stuff", UV-decay) is an acidic process that compensates pretty accurately the initial rise by adding chlorine. The full cycle of adding and using chlorine is more or less ph-neutral. The rise that you are seeing is caused by CO2 outgassing due to your high TA. Once you get your TA below about 70-80, the pH-rise should slow down. While you were chlorinating with pucks, the pH-rise by outgassing was compensated by the acidity of the Trichlor.

The higher the TA, the higher the pH will be where the outgassing slows down significantly.

is there a meter you recommend? how often do they have to be calibrated?
I am using the Apera PH60, very happy with that. When it was new, I calibrated it each time before using it, now I settled on calibrating it every 3 to 4 weeks.
 

MiguelACA

Silver Supporter
May 12, 2020
78
Houston
Excellent, that I can do. Temps will be in the 50's for a few days, so the fill water will definitely be colder than the pool water. I'll get the pool temp up to 85-90, drop the hose in the deep end and let it ride for about 4 hours. After that, run the pump to get it mixed and test? Repeat until CYA is at the right level

Sound good?

Thanks for the info!

The colder water will separate at the bottom of the pool. So if fill water is colder, putting the hose in the deep end and letting the pool go to overflow will work. If the fill water is warmer, that will not work. Disable your pool pump during this process.
 

MiguelACA

Silver Supporter
May 12, 2020
78
Houston
My TA is lower now, and the pH rise is slower for sure. Is it safe to assume that since my CYA is so high and I'm having to use much higher amounts of chlorine than usual, the outgassing is significantly more and contributing to higher/faster pH rise?

I'll look into the APERA PH60, thanks!

Adding liquid chlorine raises pH, but "using" chlorine (for killing germs, oxidising "stuff", UV-decay) is an acidic process that compensates pretty accurately the initial rise by adding chlorine. The full cycle of adding and using chlorine is more or less ph-neutral. The rise that you are seeing is caused by CO2 outgassing due to your high TA. Once you get your TA below about 70-80, the pH-rise should slow down. While you were chlorinating with pucks, the pH-rise by outgassing was compensated by the acidity of the Trichlor.

The higher the TA, the higher the pH will be where the outgassing slows down significantly.



I am using the Apera PH60, very happy with that. When it was new, I calibrated it each time before using it, now I settled on calibrating it every 3 to 4 weeks.
 

mknauss

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
Bronze Supporter
May 3, 2014
33,337
Laughlin, NV
I suspect it will take more than 4 hours to exchange 2500 gallons. Most hoses put out about 5 to 7 gpm. Measure yours using a 5 gallon bucket.
 

MiguelACA

Silver Supporter
May 12, 2020
78
Houston
Will do, thanks. When we first filled the pool up, I had 3 hoses going into it. The pool filled up in about 6 hours, maybe 7. That works out to about 5 gpm. Guess i'll let the hose run overnight for about 8 hours, run the pump, then test CYA?

I suspect it will take more than 4 hours to exchange 2500 gallons. Most hoses put out about 5 to 7 gpm. Measure yours using a 5 gallon bucket.
 

mknauss

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
Bronze Supporter
May 3, 2014
33,337
Laughlin, NV
I recommend you test the flow rate from the hose you are going to use. Also be sure your overflow can manage that rate when you start.
 

MiguelACA

Silver Supporter
May 12, 2020
78
Houston
Ok, test the flow rate after work today. Not really sure how test the overflow, but it can drain fairly fast. Kept up with the large storms we had in Houston, I live in Northeast Houston which has been getting the hard rain. I'll measure the flow rate of the hose and go from there. I started the heater about an hour ago, according to the wife, with the current weather conditions, should be about 7 hours to raise the pool from 70 to 80. Just might be able to get the 2500 displaced by the end of the night!

I recommend you test the flow rate from the hose you are going to use. Also be sure your overflow can manage that rate when you start.
 

mknauss

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
Bronze Supporter
May 3, 2014
33,337
Laughlin, NV
Monitor the overflow when you start the hose. After 30 minutes or so you should know if you have an issue. Where does the overflow water go?
 

MiguelACA

Silver Supporter
May 12, 2020
78
Houston
The wife and I don't spend too much time underwater with our eyes open. My son though...little man is a fish, he's down there all the time lol. I tried goggles on him, but they kept coming off so it frustrated him and doesn't like wearing them. I'll give it another shot, maybe I can find some better ones.

Miguel, Independent of your water balancing efforts, I would recommend using swim goggles for the family. They are worth it.
 

mknauss

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
Bronze Supporter
May 3, 2014
33,337
Laughlin, NV
The goggles are primarily to keep them from rubbing their eyes. With proper water chemistry your eyes are unaffected by the pool water.