Yellow silt like deposits

cchaynes

Member
Jul 6, 2020
22
Wallingford, PA
I went with a less agressivne approach.

1) vac pool to waste
2) balance ph
3) add yellow treat (Yellow Treat® | United Chemical)
4) Super chlorinate with liquid chlorine (2-2.5 gal for 20,000 gal pool)
Cleared up almost in an hour
5) backwash DE filter
6) shock again as above

Results are good, it struggled to establish a chlorine level but issued dichlor shock for a third shock on day 3 and it took.

Hope this helps anyone who is looking to address this.

Pool water was in the 60-70 degree range as I turned the eater off and it was cold.
 
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Donldson

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Jun 12, 2009
4,590
NW Ohio
This "less aggressive" approach is actually likely to be far more aggressive and potentially damaging long-term.

I suggest anybody seeking information on a similar issue who happens upon this post to please start your own post asking for assistance. Following the advice posted by OP is not a very good way to deal with the problem. It is unlikely to be a lasting fix but will cause some potentially long-lasting problems that will only be correctable by water exchange.
 
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cchaynes

Member
Jul 6, 2020
22
Wallingford, PA
This "less aggressive" approach is actually likely to be far more aggressive and potentially damaging long-term.

I suggest anybody seeking information on a similar issue who happens upon this post to please start your own post asking for assistance. Following the advice posted by OP is not a very good way to deal with the problem. It is unlikely to be a lasting fix but will cause some potentially long-lasting problems that will only be correctable by water exchange.
Interesting, can you elaborate on what/why this approach will not work? Yellow Treat has a long track record with mostly positive reviews.
 

JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
21,145
You convert the pool to bromine and the CYA is no longer effective, which means that the chlorine added will quickly get lost to converting bromide into bromine and the bromine will be lost to sunlight.
 

cchaynes

Member
Jul 6, 2020
22
Wallingford, PA
The pool is perfect, CYA is in check, holds a solid FC level, perhaps if someone overused this product, then what is being said here is true and I appreciate the warning, but if used in accordance with the directions, seems to do the trick. That said, a slam isn't that much more work, so it seems like a good option too, and if the issue returns, what I will do.
 

Donldson

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Jun 12, 2009
4,590
NW Ohio
What exactly are you numbers and how are you testing to get them? How do you chlorinate your water?

What do you feel the sodium bromide did to your water that would cause this problem to go away?
What do you mean when you say "the pool is perfect"?
Why do you feel it is safe to use sodium bromide "in accordance with the directions" and what constitutes "overuse" to you?
How are you sure that, of all the steps you took, it was specifically the sodium bromide that fixed the issues you were having?
Finally: how do you know the issues are actually fixed and not just temporarily hidden?
 

cchaynes

Member
Jul 6, 2020
22
Wallingford, PA
What exactly are you numbers and how are you testing to get them? How do you chlorinate your water?
During the process I used liquid chlorine, usually, I float pucks and shock with Dichlor. Testing is with strips, they almost always agree with a test at the pool shop.
What do you feel the sodium bromide did to your water that would cause this problem to go away?
It temporarily converts to bromine which is effective at killing the algae in question, ait then goes to a zero chlorine/bromine and a heavy shock restores the chlorine residual.
What do you mean when you say "the pool is perfect"?
It tests well and looks perfect
Why do you feel it is safe to use sodium bromide "in accordance with the directions" and what constitutes "overuse" to you?
Because it is proven to work and the product has been sold since 1983, I used the correct amount, as I understand it, more is not more with this process.
How are you sure that, of all the steps you took, it was specifically the sodium bromide that fixed the issues you were having?
Because I had recently done the rest of the steps with shock and a filter recharge and it didn't go away, with this product it was nearly instant.
Finally: how do you know the issues are actually fixed and not just temporarily hidden?
Who is to say I guess, but all evidence so far is that the problem is gone, in addition, the pool will be closed soon so that is good enough for me!

Like anything there are always multiple approaches that can be taken, perhaps my issue was small enough for this to work, and perhaps it will be back, and if that is the case I will update this thread.
 

Rancho Cost-a-Lotta

Silver Supporter
Apr 10, 2018
1,623
Rancho Cucamonga, CA
Testing is with strips, they almost always agree with a test at the pool shop.
In the event @Donldson checked out, I'm sure he was referring to the unreliability of test strips and pool store testing. Both have proven to be inaccurate and inconsistent. Best bet is to invest in a good test kit (TF-100 or Taylor K-2006c) and do your own testing.

Best wishes...
 

cchaynes

Member
Jul 6, 2020
22
Wallingford, PA
In the event @Donldson checked out, I'm sure he was referring to the unreliability of test strips and pool store testing. Both have proven to be inaccurate and inconsistent. Best bet is to invest in a good test kit (TF-100 or Taylor K-2006c) and do your own testing.

Best wishes...
Thanks

is there a difference between these? besides price?


 

Rancho Cost-a-Lotta

Silver Supporter
Apr 10, 2018
1,623
Rancho Cucamonga, CA
Check out the article below. The 2006C provides more of each reagent. If I was a pool guy working on several pools, I would go with the Taylor kit. The TF-100 is the best value for a residential pool owner.

 

Wobblerlorri

Bronze Supporter
2006C has more reagents. The TF-100 (link in my sig) is less expensive and has more of the reagents you actually use the most.

I understood @Donldson perfectly. Your pool is not in any way a TFP pool. You use pucks and the occasional bag of shock. You use test strips and test at the pool store. By inference, your CYA is likely sky-high and you probably have a greatly lowered efficacy of your chlorine as a result. No wonder you keep algae.

If you'll read ABCs of Pool Water Chemistry and browse Pool School, you'll see what the TFP method is all about and why we challenged your algae removal method. Ah well, there's always next season. I recommend doing the reading and giving our method a try next year. You've got nothing to lose and everything to gain, especially money in your pocket.
 
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