Wrinkles in my liner

Her pool boy

Well-known member
I have 2 wrinkles in my vinyl liner on opposite sides of my shallow end walls. Could not flatten it out so called the installer to take a look. Long story short, I have to drain my pool until the shallow end is empty so the liner can be pulled down into the corners. Which should only take a half an hour to fix, and then I can start to refill.

so I have to drain about 60000 litres, or 16,000 gallons of perfectly clear, perfectly balanced, 85 degree water down the sewer so I can turn around half an hour later and fill it with freezing cold, untreated municipal water.

Questions is, has anyone any links to threads or videos that show how to build temporary water storage that won't cost me an arm and a leg? Seems such a waste of water and energy for such a short period. Suggestions?

Thanks

S
 

Donldson

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Jun 12, 2009
4,421
NW Ohio
Whether you try to buy the materials to build what is essentially an AG pool or rent a storage vessel from a company (the much safer option) there is just no way it is going to be cost effective. Sorry.
 

ajw22

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jul 21, 2013
18,072
Northern NJ
Call around and see what the cost is to rent two water trucks. They typically hold around 7,000 gallons. I had a 7,000 gallon water truck deliver water for $450 and they did a round trip of over 100 miles to deliver it. I would think an empty water truck sitting for a day that you load up in the morning and pump back in the afternoon would be half or less that cost.

Depending on your water and chemical cost it may be a breakeven effort.
 

Her pool boy

Well-known member
Whether you try to buy the materials to build what is essentially an AG pool or rent a storage vessel from a company (the much safer option) there is just no way it is going to be cost effective. Sorry.
Was looking to see if I could buy a used AG and found a 16ft round at 4ft deep for $400 but would need 2 of those to hold the volume of water. Lol. I found something called a "water bladder" but would also be expensive to get the volume, so you are very right...no cost effective way. Thanks Donldson
 

Her pool boy

Well-known member
Call around and see what the cost is to rent two water trucks. They typically hold around 7,000 gallons. I had a 7,000 gallon water truck deliver water for $450 and they did a round trip of over 100 miles to deliver it. I would think an empty water truck sitting for a day that you load up in the morning and pump back in the afternoon would be half or less that cost.

Depending on your water and chemical cost it may be a breakeven effort.
I started to do the math. The city I live in has a municipal website with a water calculator so you can calculate water use. The water will cost about $200 by that calculator for 64 cubic meters. The Stabilzer will cost about $25 to get the cya to 30 ppm. To heat the water the 25 degrees or so to get it back to temp will take about an hour per degree and from threads I have been reading on this site it costs approximately $2 per hour to heat the pool. So that's another $50 to heat the water. So the total cost to refill will be about $275 if all the costs pan out to be correct. Not sure what the installer will cost me but they quoted work by the 1/2 hour with first 1/2 at $130,and $50 for every additional half hour of work. Wrinkles are going to cost me close to $500 in the end. Yikes.
 

PoolguyinCT

In The Industry
Jul 21, 2014
3,077
Connecticut
Call around and see what the cost is to rent two water trucks. They typically hold around 7,000 gallons. I had a 7,000 gallon water truck deliver water for $450 and they did a round trip of over 100 miles to deliver it. I would think an empty water truck sitting for a day that you load up in the morning and pump back in the afternoon would be half or less that cost.

Depending on your water and chemical cost it may be a breakeven effort.
Water haulers also service other facilities besides pools, if they store the water the tanks loose the potable water certification..

& to take 2 trucks out of service would cost a fortune in June..
 

1Sammy

In The Industry
Jul 20, 2017
294
Windsor, Ontario. Canada
You got those wrinkles because you had and might still have water behind the liner. If you unhook the liner and get a strong wet vac behind the liner you may be lucky enough to pull those wrinkles out after the water is removed ( from behind the liner ) Tape around the vac hose to make an air tight seal.. At 85 deg the vinyl should be soft and easy to work with.
If not leave till this fall as you will be draining a foot or so water anyway ?
 

Her pool boy

Well-known member
You got those wrinkles because you had and might still have water behind the liner. If you unhook the liner and get a strong wet vac behind the liner you may be lucky enough to pull those wrinkles out after the water is removed ( from behind the liner ) Tape around the vac hose to make an air tight seal.. At 85 deg the vinyl should be soft and easy to work with.
If not leave till this fall as you will be draining a foot or so water anyway ?

Good plan...going to give it a try. Thanks Sammy.
 

Her pool boy

Well-known member
Thought I'd update this thread as the wrinkles are now gone.

As it turned out when I initially gave the vacuum behind the liner thing a try I didn't give the liner the time needed to stretch out. So only tried it on the one side before giving up. When I was swimming about a month ago I noticed the side I had vacuum had tighten right up and I didn't have a wrinkle anymore. The side I didn't vacuum still had the full wrinkle. I thought to myself and wonder if the vacuuming actually did the trick and is why one side was flat and one side still had the wrinkle.

I didnt think anymore about it or do anything about It until I got a call back from the pool store. They were calling to remind me that we hadn't scheduled the work to remove the water and straighten the liner. So I thought before doing that I'd give the vacuum behind the liner thing another try, but this time do it with a bit of methodology.

I started by placing the crevice tool of the vacuum behind the liner toward the corner of the shallow end and sucked for 30 minutes before moving half way closer to the wrinkle and sucking for another 30 minutes. I then placed the crevice tool directly over the wrinkle and sucked for another 30 minutes. Each times using my hand to help flatten out the wrinkle.

The wrinkle slowly pulled out each time and is now almost 100 percent gone. I expect it will be completely gone in the next few days as the liner pulls into place.

Lesson learnt here is that ground water can take a long time to retreat from behind the liner and wrinkles can work themselves back out...and of course don't hire your pool store to do any work until you check on this forum for advice. I saved hundreds by not rushing to do what they advised.
 

1Sammy

In The Industry
Jul 20, 2017
294
Windsor, Ontario. Canada
Don't be afraid to use a broom handle or a long shovel handle and push it down all the way to the bottom. Then you can push a garden hose with the end cut off down by the side of it and hook the vac to it with tape. Grease can be used on the wood handles.
Good on ya for getting that fixed.
 

Her pool boy

Well-known member
Don't be afraid to use a broom handle or a long shovel handle and push it down all the way to the bottom. Then you can push a garden hose with the end cut off down by the side of it and hook the vac to it with tape. Grease can be used on the wood handles.
Good on ya for getting that fixed.
Thanks for the addition tips. They will be helpful if it happens again. Right now I am wrinkle free...my pool that is...