Wintertime Blues

Young Doc

Member
May 28, 2019
18
Bagley, WI
I closed the pool in late September and was stoked to know that I would (for a few months) NOT be dealing with the unending problems and concerns a large pool can present. I WAS WRONG.
- when closing... drained pool to about 2 -3 inches below skimmer basket.
- sealed and filled skimmer recesses with anti freeze.
- lots of late season rain and wet snow takes pool level to about 1 inch above skimmer.
- skimmer baskets develop about an inch of ice above skimmer/pool level.
- release winter cover anchor straps to allow putting in pump to lower water level.
- pump pool down, clear ice from skimmer baskets, put in more anti-freeze.
- hundreds of pounds of ice and slush make re-connecting the pool cover anchor straps very difficult... stretching springs to full compression... leaving cover stretched to what looks like the max.

- Now I'm wondering... why is there not a way to pump out water with a winter cover in place?
- Is there a way to determine the water level with a winter cover in place?
- Why can't pools be more user friendly?
 
Last edited:

Newdude

Well-known member
Jun 16, 2019
1,482
NY
Is there a way to determine the water level with a winter cover in place
If you can get the skimmer top plate off, the water level inside the skimmer is the same in the pool. Unless the skimmer is almost empty, then the pool height is less tha that. Some covers cover the plate also.

why is there not a way to pump out water with a winter cover in place?
If you can get the skimmer top plate off you can stick a hose through the skimmer and into the pool. You would have to weight it down for draining purposes. I use this way to fill so it keeps the hose in one spot and not flying around like a firehose.

You would need an external pump like this as opposed to the traditional sump pump.

 

Young Doc

Member
May 28, 2019
18
Bagley, WI
Thanks for the input. I did think of putting a hose thru the skimmer hole and into the pool. The problem is here in Wisconsin it is cold enough to freeze the top layer of the pool water. I would have to somehow break thru the ice to get a pump hose into the water. I thought of temporarily putting a heavy 2" trash pump hose thru the skimmer and into the pool when covering the pool in the fall. Then dump some anti-freeze down the hose. I would leave this hose in place, allowing it to freeze in. I could then, possibly snake a garden hose down thru it when it comes time to pump water out of the pool. After pumping I would pull the garden hose out and add anti-freeze back into the 2" hose and be ready to pump again if needed.
 

ajw22

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jul 21, 2013
11,283
Northern NJ
Do NOT touch the pool water level once you have a layer of ice on the water. The sides of the ice can be sharp and tear your liner if the ice moves. Leave the water level alone.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Newdude

Newdude

Well-known member
Jun 16, 2019
1,482
NY
You have to keep an eye on it and drain before it freezes, or leave it alone. It fills back up slowly with rain so you have plenty of time to see it coming. Usually i keep an eye on the extended weather forecast and will go drain before the big freeze when it comes. (If the pool needs it)
 

Young Doc

Member
May 28, 2019
18
Bagley, WI
Do NOT touch the pool water level once you have a layer of ice on the water. The sides of the ice can be sharp and tear your liner if the ice moves. Leave the water level alone.
Are you saying that if the water level rises to the point where its above the lower level of the skimmer enclosure I should let it be and allow it to freeze within that enclosure?
 

ajw22

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jul 21, 2013
11,283
Northern NJ
Are you saying that if the water level rises to the point where its above the lower level of the skimmer enclosure I should let it be and allow it to freeze within that enclosure?
Correct. You should have Gizzmos and pool noodles in your skimmer to allow ice to expand without cracking anything. Ice expands upwards and will just expand up out the top of the skimmer.