Will I need a different gas meter? Gas line suggestions?

SlipperyPete

Member
Sep 19, 2020
13
Baton Rouge, LA
so it looks like your gas line is 58 feet from the meter.
plus the length up and down the wall so it's about 80' for the total run
And the stubout is right next to the heater correct.
yes. that is where I'd like to place the heater.
appears to be 11/2 in.Is this correct?
I believe so. The exterior dimension of the pipe seems to be just under 2" so I think it is 1.5"
Or see if you can call the gas company and get them to address this now. You may have to ask to speak with the engineering department.
When I spoke to a phone rep on Friday, they said a 'tech' should call me. But my gas company isn't very responsive. I may be waiting a while.
 

SlipperyPete

Member
Sep 19, 2020
13
Baton Rouge, LA
You can replace the meter with a bigger meter and go from regular low pressure (about 8" wc) to higher pressure at 2 psi, which will allow the line to carry more than enough gas.

You would not have to run any new lines.

You would have to put a regulator near each appliance or on each leg going to each set of appliances to reduce the pressure from 2 psi to 8" wc to go into the individual appliance.

How many legs T off of the main line?
Ok. I plan to get in the attic later to count the T's. I'll post back. I'm about to go visit my parents so it may be this afternoon. Thanks!
 

mguzzy

Gold Supporter
Jul 8, 2015
2,426
OV, CA
So I just looked at your layout. Is that stub out right next to where you want to put the pad? If its that size all the way from the meter I would think that should work if you get a meter upgrade to support the higher demand. How often do you think you will be running both furnaces, the grill, everyone is taking showers AND you are heating the spa at the same time...

As a general suggestion from experience. Put the pad where you want it, it will be worth the effort to make it happen. The last two pools I was involved with we were never happy with where the builders put the pool equipment. They always put where it easiest for them. And in my house, the one I bought with a pool, I moved the pad 30 ft it bugged me so much... It also coincided with all new equipment too. But I am much happier with where it is. The previous owners..the ones that had the pool built, complained they didn't like where the builders put the equipment pad either.
 

SlipperyPete

Member
Sep 19, 2020
13
Baton Rouge, LA
So I just looked at your layout. Is that stub out right next to where you want to put the pad?
Yes. I just checked the attic. I have 5 T's on the gas line.

T1 - Furnace
T2 - 180k max water heater
T3 - Gas Cooktop in kitchen
T4 - Furnace, 157 max water heater, & gas lantern on porch
T5 - 60k outdoor kitchen burner
I will look up the info later on the other appliances.

How often do you think you will be running both furnaces, the grill, everyone is taking showers AND you are heating the spa at the same time...
We are in Louisiana and rarely run the heaters in the house. If I'm in the spa, I'm not in the shower nor cooking. So I think the idea of the upgraded meter and regulators at the T locations seem like the best deal to be honest.

Put the pad where you want it, it will be worth the effort to make it happen.
:cheers:
 

JoyfulNoise

TFP Expert
Platinum Supporter
May 23, 2015
17,446
Tucson, AZ
Pool Size
16000
Surface
Plaster
Chlorine
Salt Water Generator
SWG Type
Pentair Intellichlor IC-40
Check your local codes. As @JamesW said there are two options for residential gas delivery - high pressure at ~2psi and low pressure at ~ 7-11” WC (~0.28 psi). Some local codes do not allow the high pressure delivery to be run inside a home as it represent a much more dangerous situation for leaks, fires, and property damage. Your local codes may allow it. Only a qualified gas plumber can tell you what is code compliant. In some municipalities, the gas company will certify certain plumbers to do work on their equipment. You should definitely keep at it with your gas company and start with them. Their technicians know their equipment and may be able to guide you further on code compliance.
 

JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
21,553
Here is a type of regulator that would be used. If you have a vent limiter, you won't have to run vent lines from the regulators to outside.




G2413.6 (402.6) Maximum Design Operating Pressure
The maximum design operating pressure for piping systems located inside buildings shall not exceed 5 pounds per square inch gauge (psig) (34 kPa gauge) except where one or more of the following conditions are met:

 
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JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
21,553
You should be able to do it with two regulators.

You would T the main line before the first T going to a house appliance.

You would have one line going to the house and one going to the heater.

Put a regulator on the line going to the house appliances and leave the heater line at 2 psi.

Near the heater, you would put a regulator to step down the pressure from 2 psi to 7 to 11" wc.
 

SlipperyPete

Member
Sep 19, 2020
13
Baton Rouge, LA
Check your local codes. As @JamesW said there are two options for residential gas delivery - high pressure at ~2psi and low pressure at ~ 7-11” WC (~0.28 psi). Some local codes do not allow the high pressure delivery to be run inside a home as it represent a much more dangerous situation for leaks, fires, and property damage. Your local codes may allow it.
The pool installer that I’m likely going with just called to say he was emailing pricing info. I asked him about gas options. He said our locality doesn’t allow high pressure in the house. He said his plumber would run the line for about $10/ft which is better than the other guy’s price that I was told.
 

JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
21,553
He said his plumber would run the line for about $10/ft which is better than the other guy’s price that I was told
That's a good price.

You can use 1.5" pipe at low pressure or 3/4" pipe at 2 psi.

You should replace the gas meter.

If you go with a 2 psi system, you could put a regulator outside near the meter going to the house and leave the heater line at 2 psi and use a regulator near the heater.

I suspect that your code would probably allow 2 psi in the house, but it's probably not worth arguing about with the builder.
 
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