Want to replace 100% of my water

racharoow

Well-known member
Jul 23, 2010
67
Southern NH
I've been fighting metal issues in my pool for the last several years. I feel the amount of metal in the water is too high and I'm tired of trying to manage the staining. I tried replacing as much as I could last year (leaving water up to the bottom of the stairs in the shallow end) but that wasn't enough. I've since removed the corroded heater from our plumbing and I need to start over!

I have a water service that can deliver the water from an area that is not high in iron (like our area), but I'm concerned about keeping the vinyl liner secure. As I understand it, the liner would need to be vacuumed tight against the walls to prevent tearing. Is this correct?

Can I do this on my own or is best left to the local pool pros? I'm pretty handy, but I'm not sure if this requires some specialized pumps/vacs.

Thanks!
 

ajw22

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jul 21, 2013
20,424
Northern NJ
@mknauss method of water exchange:

You can exchange some water without draining.

If you place a low volume sub pump in the deep end and pull water from there while adding water in the shallow end (through a skimmer or into a bucket on a step so you lessen the water disturbance) you can do a fairly efficient exchange. That is assuming the water you are filling with is the same temperature or warmer than your pool water. If your fill water is much cooler than your pool water, then switch it. Add the water to the deep end (hose on bottom) and pull water from the top step.

The location of the pump and fill hose may change if you have salt water, high calcium, etc.
In my pool, with saltwater and high calcium when I drain, I put the pump in the deep end and hose in shallow end. The water in the pool weighs more per unit volume than the fill water from the hose.

Be sure to balance the water out and water in so the pool level stays the same. Also be sure your pool pump is disabled during this process. Once started do not stop until you have exchanged the amount of water you wish.
 

Leebo

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TFP Expert
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Jul 21, 2011
10,075
Eastern Ohio
Using a water transport service you’ll likely not be able to keep up as they’ll fire up their pumps and let the water rush. With ours they can empty 5500 gallons of water into the pool in minutes. My gut says the best option is likely to drain as low as you can and dilute with water that’s been hauled in. Then repeat. It’s gonna likely cost more but I’m not sure how else it could be done.

If I may ask, how old is the liner?
 

racharoow

Well-known member
Jul 23, 2010
67
Southern NH
Sorry for the delayed response (busy weekend!).

The liner will be 10 years old this summer. It has faded a bit, but there are no tears, leaks, etc.

As for which sequestrants I've tried... I've used Jack's Magic Purple and Natural Chemistry Metal Free. I did the Jack's Magic stain test and test #6 (iron scale treatment) worked amazingly well on my cozy cove. I'm pretty confident I can get the stains to clear and get the metal in suspension, I just have had a terrible time keeping the stains away.

I could pump out quite a bit of water using my Honda pump, but I don't know if I can match the rate at which a tanker would empty in to the pool. I guess I could ask them what their rate is.
 

Leebo

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TFP Expert
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Jul 21, 2011
10,075
Eastern Ohio
Tossing out another idea, and simply tossing to put all the options on the table.

Have you thought about just waiting until you replace the liner before stressing about the metal in the water? I agree it’s a royal pain to deal with the metal (we’ve got very high iron in ours and truck it in too) however seeing there’s a chance you’ll be replacing your liner in the next ???? Years maybe it’ll be cheaper to just wait, depending on the cost of water.

Just a pure thought. I understand the pains metals brings. I also know the price of trucked in water around here.......
 

racharoow

Well-known member
Jul 23, 2010
67
Southern NH
That is certainly an option. :) I think I pay about $260 for 6000 gallons... so close to $800 total. Part of the reason I started thinking about total replacement was my repeated failed attempts at handling the issue with chemicals; it was starting to add up and my spirit was headed in the opposite direction. IIRC, the iron scale treatment from Jack's will end up being between $100-200.
 

Leebo

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Jul 21, 2011
10,075
Eastern Ohio
Have you ever attempted to harvest much rainwater in the past? Directing downspouts and avoiding backflushing at all costs have really assisted us greatly. We’ve got two 250 gallon tanks that well store rainwater in every year that we use for topping off during the hot summer months. Reason I ask is maybe you could also drain most the water leaving a foot or two in the shallow then really get aggressive about filling with rain during the April and May months when the area commonly sees heavy rains?
 
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racharoow

Well-known member
Jul 23, 2010
67
Southern NH
Have you ever attempted to harvest much rainwater in the past? Directing downspouts and avoiding backflushing at all costs have really assisted us greatly. We’ve got two 250 gallon tanks that well store rainwater in every year that we use for topping off during the hot summer months. Reason I ask is maybe you could also drain most the water leaving a foot or two in the shallow then really get aggressive about filling with rain during the April and May months when the area commonly sees heavy rains?
I like that idea! I had thought of directing downspouts in to the pool (with inline filters), but have yet to take any action. Did you bury your tanks?
 

BuckeyeMac

Well-known member
Jun 10, 2018
152
Carroll, OH
I've started to research using rain water to fill the pool in the spring. This is my first pool (and first year opening). Since I'm on well water, I think i'd rather use rain water.
 
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mattchase00

In The Industry
Feb 27, 2019
27
Largo, FL
Sometimes trace metal staining lifts from vinyl quite easy, May want to try passive "Purple" treatment you can contact us at the office for protocol..

Matt
Technical Support
Jack's Magic Products
 

Spitdog

Member
Apr 17, 2019
24
North East
I had the same problem as you. My local water is high in iron. Trying to treat it was nothing but a money losing venture. My solution was rain water. Over a period of 3 yrs or so, no more stains. I have become a master of dumping water before and during heavy rain storms. And I never use the hose from the house. I do tend to keep my water level higher, simply because I don’t really know when it’s going to rain and I may need that excess for a back wash or two.
 

bmoreswim

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Jul 16, 2012
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Central MD
I've started to research using rain water to fill the pool in the spring. This is my first pool (and first year opening). Since I'm on well water, I think i'd rather use rain water.
This is pretty easy to do in the spring. But requires more effort for a permanent approach. Each late winter, I stop pumping out the water when there is no longer a fear of heavy ice forming up near the tile line. Which usually only leaves a few inches to add by my well. Thankfully my well is good water so no concern other than the resource itself.

Good thoughts in posts above.
 

BuckeyeMac

Well-known member
Jun 10, 2018
152
Carroll, OH
I hooked up to one of my gutters, and ran a 25' corrugated pipe to my pool. I secured panty hose with a zip tie at the end to catch the stuff in the water before it goes into the pool. This captures 1/2 of the rain water that falls onto my roof. I've been able to fill up my pool enough to get it going (only needed about 6-8inches). I did use my well water for about the first 1-2 inches. But moving forward I will use my rain water contraption unless I absolutely have to. I am also thinking of getting a diverter so that I can have it run through my downspouts as usual, and then flip it over to filling up the pool when needed.

I also am running the water level high for the same reasons @Spitdog stated above.
 

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chiefwej

LifeTime Supporter
TFP Guide
Jun 12, 2011
3,517
Tucson
Interesting how we all have different water issues. Here in the desert, it’s not iron, but the water is so hard you chew it. High CH and high TA. Rainwater isn't really an option with an annual rainfall of 14 inches, and evaporation rate that can reach 12 inches in a single month.

The great thing about TFP is it allows each of us all to seek answers to our individual needs, and share solutions to the problems.
 
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Spitdog

Member
Apr 17, 2019
24
North East
I’m in the NE also and Its amazing how much water we get. When I closed, I lowered to the returns and it filled back up before Christmas, this spring I bet was twice that.