Raccoon Poop.... Really Scared!

mskillens

Member
Jun 26, 2019
13
Los Angeles, CA
I agree with others, raccoons poop in so many water sources that humans swim in every year and yet there aren’t many reports of illnesses associated with the round worm eggs found in raccoon scat. My theory is the CDC needs to inform the person of the most 100 percent fail proof solution to potential disease so they don’t get in trouble because there might be that one in one million chance.

You should go forth what you would find to be the most comfortable solution for you and ask yourself these questions: how often do you encounter raccoon scat or other animal scat in your pool? Are there any measures to prevent animals from going in your pool if you do run into droppings multiple times a year? Is this situation extremely rare, if so, would draining and refilling give you peace of mind? Nobody should be afraid or too uncomfortable to be in their pool water. The honest most rational opinion from me and everyone else is SLAM the pool, run your filter 48 hours, backwash filter and you are probably 99 percent okay. It’s just CDC needs to give you a method that’s 100 percent fail proof, if you know what I mean.

Think about it, how many people vacation or leisure swimming underwater in lakes, rivers, ponds, and dirty beaches without a hitch? In a sense, those people are lucky because they are risking some gnarly bacterial infections going in untreated water like that. So overall, you’ll be fine. You’re already on top of things. Just my two cents.
 

frogabog

Gold Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
Jul 16, 2010
2,833
Portland, Oregon
It’s just CDC needs to give you a method that’s 100 percent fail proof, if you know what I mean.
While I do agree with all your points, the problem is that with this particular worm there's only one almost 100% guarantee and the CDC has provided it. Drain, wash/sanitize, change filter media, and refill. And send a sample off to be tested. Bleach doesn't kill this thing, even full strength. So there's only one option if you're concerned enough to go that route.

That being said, they do say the chances are very low. So there's that.

I really don't think it's something to worry about, and also there's always the chance of miss-identifying the poo.
 

Wobblerlorri

Bronze Supporter
I really don't think it's something to worry about, and also there's always the chance of miss-identifying the poo.
Exactly. I think it's far more likely for a duck or Canada goose to poop in a pool than a raccoon to do so. If we worry about every little thing that could introduce bacteria and parasites to our pools (dogs and little kids, anyone?) I think we'd never get in them, just super-chlorinate them all the time.

That's no way to live.
 
  • Haha
Reactions: frogabog