New pool build Geometrical 18000 gallons in Maryland

Neto

Well-known member
Jun 10, 2019
101
Urbana, MD
Next phase is electrical and there is a slight issue, they want to run the primary wiring through my finished basement meaning they will need to break drywall etc. They are saying that by code they cant run any underground electrical less than 5ft away from pool. Code says it can be done if it’s related to pool and required to supply electricity to pool equipment (2014 NEC 680.10 or 2017 NEC 680.11). Not sure what’s going to happen...
 

kimkats

Mod Squad
LifeTime Supporter
Jul 10, 2012
40,354
Tallahassee, FL
Are you saying they want to put your pool equipment panel inside your basement?? Instead of by the equipment?? That is crazy! I guess it is time for a sit down talk with them to cover what it what as well as what YOU want so long as it follows code. Do you feel comfortable with your knowledge or would you like to call in a couple of people who may be able to help you with codes and what to say?

Kim:kim:
 

Neto

Well-known member
Jun 10, 2019
101
Urbana, MD
Are you saying they want to put your pool equipment panel inside your basement?? Instead of by the equipment?? That is crazy! I guess it is time for a sit down talk with them to cover what it what as well as what YOU want so long as it follows code. Do you feel comfortable with your knowledge or would you like to call in a couple of people who may be able to help you with codes and what to say?

Kim:kim:
No, just the wiring from the main breaker panel to the pool subpanel
 

kimkats

Mod Squad
LifeTime Supporter
Jul 10, 2012
40,354
Tallahassee, FL
Ummmmmmm if they don't do that where would they connect it to? (I tend to ask a lot of questions to make sure I understand and to help me learn)
 

kimkats

Mod Squad
LifeTime Supporter
Jul 10, 2012
40,354
Tallahassee, FL
They thought they were going to make some fast money :roll: Good job on doing it on your own. You might want to check with the warranty for DIY vs "licensed" installer.

Kim:kim:
 

Neto

Well-known member
Jun 10, 2019
101
Urbana, MD
Tile and coping is in progress but we hit a major issue. We have an existing travertine patio layed on a concrete and mortar base and now the pool coping is sitting 2+” above our patio. PB said it would only be 1/2” higher so we could attach it. We dont know what to do now.
 

Attachments

bmoreswim

Mod Squad
Gold Supporter
Platinum Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
Jul 16, 2012
5,230
Central MD
I'm sorry they didn't get the pool elevation correct. Looking at the bright side for a second, it's better too high than too low for drainage. What I'd do is cut back the concrete to roughly the house side of the column, and angle the patio from there up to the pool. That will be roughly 2" over 4', which is noticeable but very reasonable to walk on. Ideally you go further back and slow it more gently, but then you take away more the existing patio at the consistent slope. You could also install a drain at the change in angle. But I'd say this cost should be on the PB since the expectation was that it would be a small gentle slope. But regardless, you need them to meet without a step and 2' is too short for a 2" rise in my opinion, for comfort/safety. The slope itself isn't too bad, but it's the change/inconsistency that is not good. I'm not sure why this wasn't identified back on July 11th from your pictures, but that is really beside the point now.
 

PoolGate

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jun 7, 2017
3,489
Damascus, MD
Looks like whomever did the planning did not account for the depth of the coping. Bad planning that will be hard to fix. Anything you do will end up with a sharp incline and hopefully not a tripping hazard. There is no real way to fix that fear.
 

Neto

Well-known member
Jun 10, 2019
101
Urbana, MD
I'm sorry they didn't get the pool elevation correct. Looking at the bright side for a second, it's better too high than too low for drainage. What I'd do is cut back the concrete to roughly the house side of the column, and angle the patio from there up to the pool. That will be roughly 2" over 4', which is noticeable but very reasonable to walk on. Ideally you go further back and slow it more gently, but then you take away more the existing patio at the consistent slope. You could also install a drain at the change in angle. But I'd say this cost should be on the PB since the expectation was that it would be a small gentle slope. But regardless, you need them to meet without a step and 2' is too short for a 2" rise in my opinion, for comfort/safety. The slope itself isn't too bad, but it's the change/inconsistency that is not good. I'm not sure why this wasn't identified back on July 11th from your pictures, but that is really beside the point now.
The original plan was to add a drain between the pool and the existing patio, the drop should have been 1/2" from the pool to the drain over about 2 ft. I agree with you, the best way is to go 4' towards my house but that would require to remove the travertine that is over a heavy mortar base so it will break.

The PB said they will bring this up with their construction team on a meeting today to discuss, I am not sure what to expect, on previous issues that I brought up, they pretty much ignored me. To fix this I would probably need to order 120 Sq ft of travertine + installation & removal... Before signing the contract, I did ask about matching the patio elevation and they guaranteed that it would be fine, they did not explain any risks with this.
 

Neto

Well-known member
Jun 10, 2019
101
Urbana, MD
Looks like whomever did the planning did not account for the depth of the coping. Bad planning that will be hard to fix. Anything you do will end up with a sharp incline and hopefully not a tripping hazard. There is no real way to fix that fear.
I agree, I definately need to do something here since this is where people would enter the pool and it will be a tripping hazard.
 

bmoreswim

Mod Squad
Gold Supporter
Platinum Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
Jul 16, 2012
5,230
Central MD
The original plan was to add a drain between the pool and the existing patio, the drop should have been 1/2" from the pool to the drain over about 2 ft. I agree with you, the best way is to go 4' towards my house but that would require to remove the travertine that is over a heavy mortar base so it will break.

The PB said they will bring this up with their construction team on a meeting today to discuss, I am not sure what to expect, on previous issues that I brought up, they pretty much ignored me. To fix this I would probably need to order 120 Sq ft of travertine + installation & removal... Before signing the contract, I did ask about matching the patio elevation and they guaranteed that it would be fine, they did not explain any risks with this.
I don't disagree on needing new travertine. I wasn't concerned with limiting costs, just fixing the issue the best way. That's what will be important every day for the rest of your days there. The cost issue, whether on you or the PB, will fade away. Kids can go to a CC if need be. ;)
 

Neto

Well-known member
Jun 10, 2019
101
Urbana, MD
Thanks, any good suggestions on what a good resolution should be? Should I ask for a discount since most likely they wont be able to fix the height of the pool.....
 

PoolGate

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jun 7, 2017
3,489
Damascus, MD
Thanks, any good suggestions on what a good resolution should be? Should I ask for a discount since most likely they wont be able to fix the height of the pool.....
Who is your builder? It would make a difference. Like if you are using Browning you have a lot more leeway I would think. I would not accept that at all. I would insist that they fix it. If that means they re-tile the entire patio to properly grade to the pool, then so be it. But that is a safety hazard. It isn't high enough to be a step and too low to ignore. Their incompetence should not be your problem. And that is what that is, incompetence.
 

Rich D

Bronze Supporter
Aug 3, 2018
377
MA
Should I ask for a discount since most likely they wont be able to fix the height of the pool.....
Arrrrrgggggg...

I would absolutely start out by requesting they fix the issue at there cost to your satisfaction. This is a very simple thing to get correct and should not have happened. It simply takes attention to detail and a few double checks on critical measurements (such as the hight of a pool that is a few feet away from a expensive existing patio) . It will be a costly fix and most likely end up with you chipping in to fix there mistake but always start high then negotiate.

I personally would not be happy with pitching 4' -6' of patio that steep If there are other options. Hard to say from the pics however it looks like you have a 6-8" step from the house pad to the patio. So For me the correct fix would be to remove the pavers (travertine is supposed to be a strong stone so perhaps it could be carefully removed with a chisel) and reset the patio. You might be able to just raise the entire patio (again not sure how big your existing patio is) so the mud base could stay.