New homeowner

Jayrad

New member
Mar 2, 2020
4
Los Angeles
Hi, so my wife and I bought a house in LA with a pool in August 2019. I recently just bought a Taylor test kit 2006 and tested my water. Previously, I was putting chlorine tablets (bad decision). And chlorine intermittently. During November or December, the winds really picked up and destroyed my pool along with the crazy fires, ashes got into my pool. I recently cleaned my pool filter and clean the pool manually. I’m hoping to take better care of my pool this year. There are some traces of yellow algae along the walls and some dirt left on the floor. I did my tests and here are the results.

pH - 8
Fc = 2
Cc= 1.5
Ta 140ppm?
Calcium 500ppm?
Cya - above 200?

Not sure how accurate these are. I was looking to maintain my own pool but I don’t know where to start. Need your help, thanks!
 

wireform

Silver Supporter
In The Industry
Aug 15, 2017
1,216
Spring Valley, NY
For starters it will be important to know that you're actually using the test kit properly. If in fact the numbers a correct with a CYA of 200 it'll be next to impossible to chlorinate the water for the algae problem. You will need a complete drain and fill to begin anew. Not sure of your water table so I'll let the other members chime in here . In the mean time read pool school and get an education. I would highly recommend you convert your pool to a salt pool with SWCG so when all your numbers are inline you will have a pool closer to a set and forget except for every few days testing the PH and FC.
 

Texas Splash

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Welcome! :wave: Yeah, the low FC (based on your very high CYA) and elevated CC indicates your water is processing more junk that we would like to see. See FC/CYA Chart

I would look into a very healthy water exchange to lower the CYA and perhaps the CH a bit if you're local water isn't too terribly hard. With summer approaching, a CYA of 40-50 would be in your best interest. If you are unsure of ways to exchange water, let us know.
 

Jayrad

New member
Mar 2, 2020
4
Los Angeles
Welcome! :wave: Yeah, the low FC (based on your very high CYA) and elevated CC indicates your water is processing more junk that we would like to see. See FC/CYA Chart

I would look into a very healthy water exchange to lower the CYA and perhaps the CH a bit if you're local water isn't too terribly hard. With summer approaching, a CYA of 40-50 would be in your best interest. If you are unsure of ways to exchange water, let us know.
Thanks! I know the only way is to drain the pool. There is some rain coming for 3 days next week, wondering if that might dilute some of the water. Also, if possible I’m trying to drain the least amount of water because everything in LA is expensive.
 

Texas Splash

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Totally understand. CA residents have it tough. But CYA won't dilute, so unless you lower the water level first (before a rain) or exchange some water yourself, it won't really go down. You might take a look at the following link and look at the part where it discusses a "No drain Water Exchange". That's becoming more popular for pool owners like yourself.
 

Rancho Cost-a-Lotta

Silver Supporter
Apr 10, 2018
1,425
Rancho Cucamonga, CA
Also, if possible I’m trying to drain the least amount of water because everything in LA is expensive.
Understanding that "expensive" is a subjective term, your charge for water will likely be less than you think. It shouldn't cost you more than an additional $60 on your water bill. Water charges are based on units of Hundred Cubic Feet (HCF). A HCF is 748 gallons. If you drain and refill 15,000 gallons, your only looking at about 20 Units. Check you bill for water rates to estimate the actual cost of 20 Units. You'll probably find your rate per unit in the next higher tier is less than $2.
 
Last edited:

Jayrad

New member
Mar 2, 2020
4
Los Angeles
Thanks guys. So I think I might have a pool company drain it. They’re offering to do it for $90 and they will start the chemicals up. From there, I can maintain the levels needed in preparation for summer.
 

Texas Splash

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
They’re offering to do it for $90 and they will start the chemicals up. From there, I can maintain the levels needed in preparation for summer.
If you do that, just watch closely to see what (and how much) of each item they add. You'd be surprised.

But other than the cost of the new water itself, you'll more than likely only need:
- Stabilizer (CYA) since new water has none
- Muriatic acid to adjust pH
- Chlorine (aka regular bleach) to maintain the FC.

Don't let them talk you into any fancy pool store snake oils.