Jandy LXI - FAULT- CHECK IGN CONTROL - Appreciate help!

andrewf

Member
Oct 27, 2020
16
Houston
After searching the web, I've read through a number of posts here in the forum and I cannot believe how helpful everyone is!

Ya'll are amazing so I'm going to give it a chance.

We received some flooding here and the pool heater did take in some water, but it worked earlier in the year. Now, I am receiving a Fault - Check IGN Control error with my Jandy LXI pool heater, so we are unable to heat the pool or spa. The spa functions perfectly otherwise, with air, bubbles, etc.
Model No. LXI400N
Serial No. G11LI0710

I've followed as many steps that I came across in other threads as well as the manual: https://www.jandy.ca/-/media/zodiac/global/downloads/h/h0286900.pdf?force=1, such as:
  1. The Fan does come on and blows, but after about 4 minutes the light begins to slowly flash on the Ignition Control and the error pops up on the screen "Fault - Check IGN Control".
  2. Connected, cleaned and reconnected all the wires.
  3. Cleaned the Flame Sensor (haven't replaced it)
  4. I could see from the Sight Window on the right that the original Ignitor wasn't lighting up, so I replaced it. The new Ignitor still doesn't light up.
  5. Replaced the Ignition Control, but the Ignitor still doesn't light up.
Not sure what to do next. Any suggestions?

Thank you!
Andrew

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ajw22

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It flashes a single time slowly but continuously in that rhythm.
One flash on the Fenwal says you have an Air Flow Fault. See the label on the Fenwal box.

Check the air flow switch, check for blockage or critters in the fan area, or the speed of the fan.
 

swamprat69

Well-known member
Mar 30, 2019
355
Las Vegas, NV
Just some safety input here regarding the flooding. It is difficult to tell just how high the water level got from the original photo ( some cleanup done?). If the water level reached high enough to cover/partially cover the gas valve, the gas valve MUST be replaced. Same goes for the air pressure switch and any of the electronic components in the control compartment. It is difficult to tell in the photo whether the corrosion on the first vertical panel above and behind the burner box that I see on the bottom and middle side screws is from submersion in water or leakage from a deteriorated/loose gasket, but I do see corresponding corrosion on the gas valve itself. This is a major safety concern as to any of these parts that have been exposed to flooding/water damage because they may not operate safely in the way which they were intended to even if they initially appear to do so when the heater is put back into service.
 

andrewf

Member
Oct 27, 2020
16
Houston
Just some safety input here regarding the flooding. It is difficult to tell just how high the water level got from the original photo ( some cleanup done?). If the water level reached high enough to cover/partially cover the gas valve, the gas valve MUST be replaced. Same goes for the air pressure switch and any of the electronic components in the control compartment. It is difficult to tell in the photo whether the corrosion on the first vertical panel above and behind the burner box that I see on the bottom and middle side screws is from submersion in water or leakage from a deteriorated/loose gasket, but I do see corresponding corrosion on the gas valve itself. This is a major safety concern as to any of these parts that have been exposed to flooding/water damage because they may not operate safely in the way which they were intended to even if they initially appear to do so when the heater is put back into service.
Appreciate the insight. Yes, the cleanup was due to the flooding and not by any leak. Any corrosion was by the flood and/or age. That's the decision I'm having now: continue to replace parts and try to fix it, or buy a replacement. I am enjoying trying to fix it though, but safety is always a concern. That said, I'm hoping I don't have to hear my wife say "See... I told you just to buy a new one." :p
Thanks!
 
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andrewf

Member
Oct 27, 2020
16
Houston
I checked out the air pressure switch, made sure that the two tubes were clean and checked out the fan, which seemed okay.

I'm now getting 3 flashes - Ignition lockout. I have already bought a new ignitor from pool supply and replaced it prior. I also cleaned the sensor rod but haven't replaced it. I'm now researching this issue.
 

Pool Clown

In The Industry
Sep 5, 2008
2,184
Silicon Valley, CA
This may have already been covered...

I wouldn't be surprised if the gas rail is flooded (still has water in it). I would start there. And if the gas valve was submerged, it is probably done. Not sure if two feet of water would have gotten the board wet. If so, it too would be done. If ign control got wet, it may still function (your description of the LED flashing) however, if the relay(s) on the board got wet, their contacts could be corroded and are no longer switching current to the gas valve when energized.

Look for 24V first at the IGN control box (VAL + GND), and then at the valve. You wont get voltage until after the prepurge (about 30 sec) once there is a call for heat. You may hear a soft click at the IGN box and/or a more pronounced one at the gas valve. Note: you will only get voltage for a short time (maybe 5 seconds) before a no flame sensed will open the relay @ IGN box.

Get out your insur. policy, and see if yer covered.
 
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Pool Clown

In The Industry
Sep 5, 2008
2,184
Silicon Valley, CA
More notes: Water may have also swamped the air switch tubing and/or diaphragm, making it inoperable. You may be able to carefully blow it out. But If it is a diaphragm type, too much air pressure will kill it.
 
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andrewf

Member
Oct 27, 2020
16
Houston
Test the flame current on the test points of the Fenwal.

Look for corrosion in the ground circuit caused by the flood water...

They weren’t really dirty but I still cleaned the ground wires. Unfortunately, still got the 3 lights for the lockout.

Didn’t get a chance to test the other options recommended but will soon.

Thanks!B17C605C-8394-4366-9516-F80B981867C5.jpeg
 
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Pool Clown

In The Industry
Sep 5, 2008
2,184
Silicon Valley, CA
Ok, I believe this picture reveals a lot more now about how high the flood waters got. Comparing this picture to your first, along with your estimate of 1 to 2 feet of water, I believe most if not all of the control electronics were submerged. I wasn't trying to be funny when i suggested that you look at your insurance policy. Because even if you get this heater to fire, you may have some other issues that may make running the heater unsafe. And while replacing parts or repairing may be less expensive than a heater replacement, I wouldn't really touch the heater without a more thorough inspection/teardown.
 
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setsailsoon

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Just to confirm Pool Clown's comments have you checked the 3 boards for any evidence of water? If it's getting to the "request for heat" stage in start sequence this would indicate they are at least working. Do you get a flame that goes out, or hear the gas valve open but no ignition after, or neither? If water got to the gas valve you need to replace it and this could be your problem. If the gas valve doesn't open and produce a flame which naturally can't get detected this is one of several reasons you can get 3 flashes from the Fenwall.


Chris
 

andrewf

Member
Oct 27, 2020
16
Houston
Ok, I believe this picture reveals a lot more now about how high the flood waters got. Comparing this picture to your first, along with your estimate of 1 to 2 feet of water, I believe most if not all of the control electronics were submerged. I wasn't trying to be funny when i suggested that you look at your insurance policy. Because even if you get this heater to fire, you may have some other issues that may make running the heater unsafe. And while replacing parts or repairing may be less expensive than a heater replacement, I wouldn't really touch the heater without a more thorough inspection/teardown.
No worries I got the humor and the honesty. I'm enjoying learning more about the pool heater for sure, and you guys are incredibly helpful. I opened the heater from more angles and I would agree that the water got pretty high and a lot of the heater was fairly submerged. All 3 boards are working but I do believe water got to them.

As far as the sequence, I do hear a click but no flame. I can record the sequence if that would help?

Parts I've purchased:
- Ignitor $70
- Ignition Control $50
- Just bought an Air Switch for $20 bucks on eBay. Worth trying for the price.

The gas valve was definitely under water, and it's priced around $250 to replace it. It would put me about $400 bucks in parts so far if I got the gas valve, and I'm assuming a professional should be hired to replace this part, which would cost about $150+. At that point, getting a new one might be the better option...

- LXI Gas Valve: Zodiac LXI Gas Valve with Street Elbow Natural Gas
 
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andrewf

Member
Oct 27, 2020
16
Houston
I wouldn't get a valve until i first confirmed if it is getting voltage (brown and yellow wires) or not. Otherwise, you are just replacing parts. Sure, you may need a gas valve, but if you aren't getting voltage, you will be investing further.
Thanks. The multimeter is showing that it’s receiving 25.6, which looks correct. The ignitor control shows the valve should receive 24 VAC.
 

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Pool Clown

In The Industry
Sep 5, 2008
2,184
Silicon Valley, CA
Yep, solenoid in valve is probably corroded. DO NOT hit it with a hammer in an attempt to free it up, because it may not close again.

That is when the real fun would start...

You can now replace the gas valve with more confidence.

Note: Since the heater was submerged it would be irresponsible for me to say that you can repair this heater to a totally safe condition with just a valve replacement (along with any other parts).

If I were at your home (a service call), and in order to shield myself, i would have to tell you the only way i will work on this would be to replace the heater.

Or...

No charge today, and
You proceeded at your own peril.
 
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