Jandy ePump Bearing Replacement

Dumello

Member
Jul 17, 2017
5
Metro-Detroit, MI
I returned from a vacation to find my Jandy ePump (Variable Speed JEP1.5) making noises like the bearings are shot. I have looked all over for the part number for replacement bearings but have not had any success. I have ordered and received the mechanical seal, which may be the problem, but I'd had to open the pump up to replace the seal only to find it's the bearings. Do the Jandy parts diagrams not include the bearings because they buy the motors from many suppliers and therefore cannot specify the bearings part numbers? Will I have to open it up to find the model of motor and therefore, bearing replacement part numbers? Any guidance would be appreciated. I've replaced the bearings and seals on my Spa with no issue, so I'd like to do this myself, but I want to minimize pump downtime.

Thanks,
Dumello
 

Dumello

Member
Jul 17, 2017
5
Metro-Detroit, MI
Mine is a high pitched screech and sounds like metal on metal. It is constant and is different than before, which was a loud hum. I pulled the wet-end and removed the mechanical seal, then tried turning the motor on. There is definitely a problem with the bearings. I've looked for bearings for the model of AO Smith motor that is attached to the pump (I couldn't see the model # before) and I cannot find any information, parts diagrams, or replacement parts. I called my pool installer and they will not replace the bearings. Today I'm going to call a place that does electric motor repairs to see if they will replace the bearings. Unfortunately, Jandy has discontinued my model of pump so a drop-in replacement is probably not going to be an option. I'm also worried that my pool automation controller won't know how to communicate with any new pump I might buy. This is starting to get complicated (and expensive).
 

Dumello

Member
Jul 17, 2017
5
Metro-Detroit, MI
For closure on this thread....I took the pump motor to an electric motor repair shop near me and they said they can do it. Basically, they said it can be done, but not easily, and needs to have the bearing replaced while the shaft is in place. If the shaft is pulled it may change the electrical characteristics of the permanent magnet and, therefore, change its operating behavior. Also, the strong magnet represents a risk to hands and fingers if the shaft is pulled. His estimate was $50, which is peanuts compared to a new motor or pump, so it looks like I dodged a bullet on this one.
 
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