Is there a tutorial on how to replace returns?

moore887

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Silver Supporter
In The Industry
Aug 14, 2018
325
CAPE CORAL
This is a customer's in ground spa. They were wondering why there was so much bubbles coming from one jet causing the water to spill out onto the deck. My first inclination was that maybe the jets were in series and that one was first. However, upon closer inspection, I see that one of the directional eyeballs is missing from the return jet in question. Can this be repaired by an unskilled induvidual like myself or should they level their home and start again?
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wireform

Silver Supporter
In The Industry
Aug 15, 2017
2,507
Spring Valley, NY
Just unscrew it with the pump off and replace with new, it's that simple. The jet is a 3 part component, the outer ring, the eye ball and the back piece. Sometimes unscrewing it separates the last part leaving it in the wall. Just unscrewing that separately if it does happen and replace with all new.
 

SkimminPools

In The Industry
Oct 7, 2020
5
Phoenix, AZ
This is a customer's in ground spa. They were wondering why there was so much bubbles coming from one jet causing the water to spill out onto the deck. My first inclination was that maybe the jets were in series and that one was first. However, upon closer inspection, I see that one of the directional eyeballs is missing from the return jet in question. Can this be repaired by an unskilled induvidual like myself or should they level their home and start again?
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I know I am late by a couple months here, but when water bubbles right up the wall and splashed onto the deck, it is due to either broken jet nozzles, or clogged jet nozzles. Inside the jet pipe air mixes with flowing water to create the jet. If debris were to clog into the jet nozzle (located about 12 inches or more into the pipe) it will only push air out and no jet, the air rises in large bubbles and spills onto the deck. Keep in mind the jet water pump and air blower should both be on for a nice strong jet. Here is what I do.
I Have a long socket drive extender, about 18-24 inches. I use a regular socket drive, and usually a 9/16" socket. The eyeball needs to be out to service the nozzle. (Some jet nozzles may be a different size socket, but 90% of the ones around me are 9/16)I turn the jet pump on, with out the blower, lay down on the deck. I usually stick the extender with socket attached into the hole, wiggle around until it slips over the nozzle. Some nozzles are threaded, some are twist and lock. The jet pump being on helps it pop it when loose. Quarter turn counterclockwise and the twist and lock will pop out and you can bring it out. It will twist and stop if it is twist and lock and poo off immediately. If not, turn a couple rotations in case it is threaded. I like to pull it out slowly and inspect for a clog in the nozzle. It may have blown out from the force of the water as well. I do this for each jet. Keep in mind, some of those return lines may not be jets. And typically when there is a clogged jet, not all jets work, and while running the jets, put your hand over all the inlets, some of them may actually have suction on them due to another line being clogged. Installation of the cleaned nozzle may be tricky, you want the pump off for that. But just feed it back in the line, making sure it is snug into the socket, slowly tighten and slightly push until the nozzle has found its home. Quarter turn right and should click into place, or thread. If the nozzle is damaged, like one of the locking tabs, or broken anywhere, you will need to order a new nozzle and pay attention to the diameter of the hole in the tip of the nozzle. Order the same size.
 
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