Is the niche and conduit designed to be wet?

masand

Active member
May 19, 2010
31
Atlanta, GA
#1
Sorry if I'm hijacking this post but think this is a related question.
Please ask questions in your own topic. JasonLion

Is the niche and conduit designed to be wet? In other words, in a proper install will there be water in the niche and part of the conduit (up to the water line)?
 

Flippy

Well-known member
Jan 8, 2011
596
Richmond, Texas
#2
Re: Question about light wiring

masand said:
Sorry if I'm hijacking this post but think this is a related question.

Is the niche and conduit designed to be wet? In other words, in a proper install will there be water in the niche and part of the conduit (up to the water line)?

My niche and conduit were wet and as far as I understand that is normal. Where the wires terminated is a good 2 feet above water level.
 

waste

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Mar 29, 2007
4,160
Coastalish 'down easter'
#4
Welcome to TFP!!

In 23 years of doing pools, I've only seen "wet niches" which are supposed to have water in tehm - it helps keep the heat from the light from getting too high and tripping the breaker (however, if they make a wet niche, I assume there is such a thing as a dry niche :p )
 

racket

In The Industry
Mar 8, 2011
441
#5
waste said:
Welcome to TFP!!

In 23 years of doing pools, I've only seen "wet niches" which are supposed to have water in tehm - it helps keep the heat from the light from getting too high and tripping the breaker (however, if they make a wet niche, I assume there is such a thing as a dry niche :p )
There are dry niche lights. The only time I have seen functional ones are in really old municipal pools.
]
 

skamp

Active member
May 22, 2010
37
Cypress, TX
#6
I thought the goal was to keep the conduit dry. In my niche it has a rubber bushing and nut that compresses to seal it. They also sell butyl to seal the conduit. With that said the only reason I would a need to seal it is if the conduit pipe (below water line) has a leak which could allow water to leak out of the pool. When I replaced my light a few weeks ago I sealed the conduit with butyl tape just for good measure. I see no downside of doing this.

Steve
 

JasonLion

TFP Expert
Platinum Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
May 7, 2007
37,879
Silver Spring, MD
#7
If the light is designed to be serviced from the water side you want the conduit to be wet. You only use a dry conduit when there is access to the niche from the dry side.

Sealing the back of the niche is sometimes done, but causes problems later on. When the fixture eventually needs to be replaced the cable needs to be pulled out, which sealing the back of the niche usually makes impossible.