Is our pool sloping too much?

Jackie G

Well-known member
Jul 19, 2017
121
Kent
Ok update on our sloping pool.
We emptied it which took4 days amd eventually got round to looking at the paving slabs.

As expected we hadnt placed the slabs out far enough. This meant that the frame legs were standing right on the outer edge of the slabs, and had slipped off onto the earth hence making that side lower. The slabs had therefore been pushed upwards, some had broken too.

We had to dig out a little wider to move the slabs outwards so that the frame legs sit close to the middle of the slabs.

We used a water level to ensure each slab was level with each other, and our starting point was inside the empty pool so that we know slabs are level. We tamped down the earth and then put sand on it and tamped that down too before putting the slab down.

We now finally have it filled, and it looks spot on. Provided nothing sinks again.....I'm going to keep my fingers crossed. Now to try and get the chemically we need. We have to ship them from the US. Nightmare!

Thanks for everyone's help and advice. Here are a couple of pics. It still needs cleaning so ignore that if you can 😁😁
 

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Arizonarob

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Mar 25, 2018
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Remove the sand layer, find the lowest spot where the legs are now, and dig down the rest of the spots so it is level with the lowest spot. If you use the same foot print where the pool is now that ground will be well compacted by the weight of the pool and there should be very little movement. You can rent a transom or you can build a water level to help you level the pool.
That video is so cool. I have never seen or herd about that thing. I’ll be adding that to my arsenal of tools!!
 

Jackie G

Well-known member
Jul 19, 2017
121
Kent
I'm distraught!
I just checked the slabs because it still appears to be bowing to the right, although not as much. The slabs are all broken in the middle. I can't believe it. Wierdly on the left side the slabs are not even showing which suggests the frame is sitting right at the end again 🤔🤔
What do you think? Safe or not?
 

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Windylou

Silver Supporter
May 11, 2017
208
Groveton, Tx
I'm distraught!
I just checked the slabs because it still appears to be bowing to the right, although not as much. The slabs are all broken in the middle. I can't believe it. Wierdly on the left side the slabs are not even showing which suggests the frame is sitting right at the end again 🤔🤔
What do you think? Safe or not?
Jackie, I have the same style pool. Fork out the money & use the pressure treated wood. I used 2x12’s, didn’t have to cut them except a couple to butt ends up. I put just a bit of gravel under them also, I can’t even give an explanation, I just do that with everything.lol. The wood has the ability to ‘give’ a little too without breaking. I wouldn’t wish your situation on anyone. I can’t even imagine doing ground prep 3 times, the first time was so stressful! I started on level ground, put down polystyrene foam 2 inches. Overkill, I know. Then the 2x12’s. That’s why I used the gravel, bc the boards are actually an inch & a half. That was 3 years ago, I don’t take it down in the winter. Don’t drain down. My pool is structurally perfect. I learned the hard way in the pool world not to try to ‘skimp’, it will cost you more in time & work in the long run. But thanks to TFP, we have a gorgeous giant pool that the entire neighborhood envies!
 
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Jackie G

Well-known member
Jul 19, 2017
121
Kent
Jackie, I have the same style pool. Fork out the money & use the pressure treated wood. I used 2x12’s, didn’t have to cut them except a couple to butt ends up. I put just a bit of gravel under them also, I can’t even give an explanation, I just do that with everything.lol. The wood has the ability to ‘give’ a little too without breaking. I wouldn’t wish your situation on anyone. I can’t even imagine doing ground prep 3 times, the first time was so stressful! I started on level ground, put down polystyrene foam 2 inches. Overkill, I know. Then the 2x12’s. That’s why I used the gravel, bc the boards are actually an inch & a half. That was 3 years ago, I don’t take it down in the winter. Don’t drain down. My pool is structurally perfect. I learned the hard way in the pool world not to try to ‘skimp’, it will cost you more in time & work in the long run. But thanks to TFP, we have a gorgeous giant pool that the entire neighborhood envies!
 

Jackie G

Well-known member
Jul 19, 2017
121
Kent
Thank you. Yes, i think if we can get away with it this year we may empty it again next year and do that. Him indoors was suggesting using concrete next time as he thinks wood would rot because its in the earth. Thoughts on that? He's a carpenter so I assume he knows what he's talking about but I also know that lots recommend using the wood instead of slabs too 😊
 

Jackie G

Well-known member
Jul 19, 2017
121
Kent
Looks like you're going to have to ditch the pavers and go with pressure-treated ground contact wood. That won't crack.
Ok 😪 is it looking safe to swim in you think in terms of it's levelness? I really don't want to have to empty it again, and we don't have the money at the moment to buy the timber 😪
 

setsailsoon

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Oct 25, 2015
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Jackie,

Fascinating post. I have no experience with AG pools but am helping my son erect a 24' round pool. First time for both of us. This information is very helpful. Thanks for taking the time to do it! The only thing I have to offer is about pressure treated lumber. It lasts for years in contact with soil. I've installed many fence posts using it as well as numerous deck supports. Pressure treated means it has a liquid that is forced into the wood under pressure that is resistant to rot. Years ago it used to be permanent but new environmental rules have changed the chemical so it doesn't last quite as long but should be fine for your application.

I hope this helps.

Chris
 

Arizonarob

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Mar 25, 2018
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Chandler Arizona
Ok, thank you. My big question at moment is does it look level enough to use as is for the next two to three months, before we drain and empty it again?
Jackie, if it were me, I would fix it. With that being said, it’s better then it was beforehand. Take a tape measure and go from the fence to the top center of the right side of The pool. Make note of the measurement, then check it weekly to see if it’s moving more. If it stays the same, it should be ok for a bit. If it starts to bow more over time, cease use and repair immediately. :cheers:
 
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Jackie G

Well-known member
Jul 19, 2017
121
Kent
Jackie,

Fascinating post. I have no experience with AG pools but am helping my son erect a 24' round pool. First time for both of us. This information is very helpful. Thanks for taking the time to do it! The only thing I have to offer is about pressure treated lumber. It lasts for years in contact with soil. I've installed many fence posts using it as well as numerous deck supports. Pressure treated means it has a liquid that is forced into the wood under pressure that is resistant to rot. Years ago it used to be permanent but new environmental rules have changed the chemical so it doesn't last quite as long but should be fine for your application.

I hope this helps.

Chris
Jackie, if it were me, I would fix it. With that being said, it’s better then it was beforehand. Take a tape measure and go from the fence to the top center of the right side of The pool. Make note of the measurement, then check it weekly to see if it’s moving more. If it stays the same, it should be ok for a bit. If it starts to bow more over time, cease use and repair immediately. :cheers:
Thank you. Will do that measurement. It looks like the water is definitely dropping on one side 😒😒
 

Jackie G

Well-known member
Jul 19, 2017
121
Kent
Jackie,

Fascinating post. I have no experience with AG pools but am helping my son erect a 24' round pool. First time for both of us. This information is very helpful. Thanks for taking the time to do it! The only thing I have to offer is about pressure treated lumber. It lasts for years in contact with soil. I've installed many fence posts using it as well as numerous deck supports. Pressure treated means it has a liquid that is forced into the wood under pressure that is resistant to rot. Years ago it used to be permanent but new environmental rules have changed the chemical so it doesn't last quite as long but should be fine for your application.

I hope this helps.

Chris
Him indoors is adamant the wood will rot. I must admit we had some treated decking in the earth and it was pretty much rotted 2/3 years later...

He wants to put concrete down instead of the slabs next time we empty it...

Goodness this is a flippin nightmare 😪😪😪

Thank you everyone for your help
 

mguzzy

Gold Supporter
Jul 8, 2015
2,025
OV, CA
Him indoors is adamant the wood will rot. I must admit we had some treated decking in the earth and it was pretty much rotted 2/3 years later...

He wants to put concrete down instead of the slabs next time we empty it...

Goodness this is a flippin nightmare 😪😪😪

Thank you everyone for your help
untreated wood would definitely rot out in two or three years. Pressure treated wood (the green stuff) won't. The treatment helps keep it from rotting. How do your think they get telephones poles to last for years? If he wants to pour a concrete slab, even better.
 

setsailsoon

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Oct 25, 2015
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Actually either will work if they are strong enough. Problem with concrete is that it has huge compressive strength and little tensile strength. Technical jargon engineers like to use to describe push and pull force. When your pool fills the load increases the load (weight) that is in contact with the support and becomes very high. Your pool weighs about 41000 lb when full. As this pushes down on the concrete the slab wants to bend in the middle which introduces push and pull forces. The pull part makes it break. You can make the concrete thicker, use stronger concrete or reinforce it with steel which has great "pull" strength. It would be way cheaper to use 2x12 pressure treated and just replace every couple of years if it deteriorates. But I don't want to stand in the way of marital relations so you may want to get a quote from a concrete fabricator for higher-strength, re-enforced concrete blocks. I think that may help and either will work. For my son's pool we'll use 2x12's.

Thanks again for creating this post that has accumulated great information on AG pools.

Chris
 
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