I just learned - the hard way - all about building a pool!

judithleah

Member
Oct 10, 2018
21
Boca Raton, Florida
I also considered making it darker, but after a bit of research decided against it. It seems that any flaws will show up more on a darker finish. (I guess deep inside, I anticipated that I wouldn't be getting a perfect finish.)
 

Waterfan

Bronze Supporter
Apr 30, 2018
59
Chattanooga, TN
If we lived closer to each other I would certainly swear we had the same builder! We have had nothing but issues as we roll into the 11th month now. The attorney tells me he will just file bankruptcy so it isn't worth filing. There are over 50 lawsuits ahead of me - despite a BBB rating of A+. I wish you the best!
 

judithleah

Member
Oct 10, 2018
21
Boca Raton, Florida
Hi,
Although this has nothing to do with pool construction, I am happy to answer your question.
You have probably heard about the Jewish Sabbath, on which observant Jewish people do no work (as defined by Jewish law, not necessarily the way we generally perceive work.) In addition to the Sabbath, there are several holidays throughout the year which may fall out on weekdays, which have a similar status, and are also held dear to our hearts. For work that we are not permitted to do ourselves, we may not pay someone else to do on our behalf. Having a contractor lay pavers on that day on our property certainly violates that law. (Now, if the contractor would have agreed to take no payment for that day, and just do it for his own benefit, there would have been no problem. :)) But of course, he didn't look at it that way, so he was paid, forcing me to violate my sacred principles. The fact that I anticipated that this might happen and insisted on an addendum to assure that it didn't should tell you how important this is to us.
Hope that explains the matter. Happy to answer any other questions.
 

judithleah

Member
Oct 10, 2018
21
Boca Raton, Florida
Hi Kim,
Short of ripping up the pavers, is there any way for us to know whether the railing is bonded to the bonding wire (or if there even is one)? I could ask them directly, but at this point, I wouldn't trust their answer.
Judy
 

kimkats

Mod Squad
LifeTime Supporter
Jul 10, 2012
46,352
Tallahassee, FL
I am putting in a call to someone what will know for sure. For now I would like for you to go out to your equipment pad and see if there is a plain wire sticking up out of the ground and "bolted" to your pump by a clamp kind of thing.

The wire should have been laid all the way around your pool in a continuous loop. IT should be tied into your rebar around the pool AND the handrail. My fear is that since the handrail was added late in the game there is no way it was bonded :( We shall see what my people have to say. Hold on a bit until they get back with us.

Kim
 

kimkats

Mod Squad
LifeTime Supporter
Jul 10, 2012
46,352
Tallahassee, FL
opps I just thought of something with your tiles. Your bonding wire will not be tied into the rebar as you may not have any since you have tiles. BUT if you have a light you should have the bonding wire going all around the pool to bond the light as such there should be a place to tie in the handrail. Getting to it? well that could be the hard part. I am also hoping they did not cut it when they drilled for the handrail :(
 

PoolGate

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jun 7, 2017
4,825
Damascus, MD
My inspector had to inspect all items that were to be bonded. If he were to come for final inspection and see a railing that was not there in the previous inspection, the final inspection would fail. You need some sort of proof that the rail is bonded. His word is not enough. If no pictures were taken the railing needs to be dug up and looked at. This is a safety issue as people can and have been killed by not properly bonded metal around the pool.
 

judithleah

Member
Oct 10, 2018
21
Boca Raton, Florida
Update: No one approached us for the final check yesterday. That undoubtedly means that they know there are huge issues here. A text to remind them of these issues - footprints and uninstalled escutcheon - got us an "I'll check with the service department" response. I haven't even raised the bonding issue with them yet. I'm having our new pool maintenance guy come around to try to verify whether or not it's been done. Looks like it's going to be a long haul! I sure hope that this pool is worth it in the end!
 

sktn77a

Gold Supporter
May 16, 2010
1,826
Chapel Hill, NC
Hi Kim,
Short of ripping up the pavers, is there any way for us to know whether the railing is bonded to the bonding wire (or if there even is one)? I could ask them directly, but at this point, I wouldn't trust their answer.
Judy
You can connect a volt/ohm/amp meter to the handrail and then to any bonded part of the pool equipment and check for continuity (zero ohms) across those two points. If the equipment is running, you can also check for a voltage differential. Everything should be zero.
 

PoolGate

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jun 7, 2017
4,825
Damascus, MD
Update: No one approached us for the final check yesterday. That undoubtedly means that they know there are huge issues here. A text to remind them of these issues - footprints and uninstalled escutcheon - got us an "I'll check with the service department" response. I haven't even raised the bonding issue with them yet. I'm having our new pool maintenance guy come around to try to verify whether or not it's been done. Looks like it's going to be a long haul! I sure hope that this pool is worth it in the end!
Just to be sure we are talking about the same thing, I am referring to county inspections. Your locale is undoubtedly different than mine but I had I think 5 separate inspections along the way done by county inspectors for engineering, bonding, electrical, plumbing, etc. My bonding failed 2 times and had to be remediated by my pool builder. Once was for unconnected rebar sticking out of the ground in various locations (13 pieces total were found). The inspector told me that specifically killed a 12 year old a couple of years ago. If your pool was properly permitted I would think that would require some level of county inspections.
 

bdavis466

TFP Expert
Platinum Supporter
Aug 4, 2014
5,529
San Clemente, CA
You can connect a volt/ohm/amp meter to the handrail and then to any bonded part of the pool equipment and check for continuity (zero ohms) across those two points. If the equipment is running, you can also check for a voltage differential. Everything should be zero.
:goodpost:

To be completely sure you need to dig to find the wire. It doesn't sound like it was bonded
 

Poolbella

Silver Supporter
Jun 28, 2018
246
Houston, TX
Just to be sure we are talking about the same thing, I am referring to county inspections. Your locale is undoubtedly different than mine but I had I think 5 separate inspections along the way done by county inspectors for engineering, bonding, electrical, plumbing, etc. My bonding failed 2 times and had to be remediated by my pool builder. Once was for unconnected rebar sticking out of the ground in various locations (13 pieces total were found). The inspector told me that specifically killed a 12 year old a couple of years ago. If your pool was properly permitted I would think that would require some level of county inspections.
Not to hijack the thread, but I live in an area that does not require permits or inspections of any kind. We are using a very well respected large PB firm, but should I be concerned about this kind of thing?
 

judithleah

Member
Oct 10, 2018
21
Boca Raton, Florida
Try to be there to watch them to make sure. Or hire someone to be there if you can't. There are special spongey things that they are supposed to wear on their feet when they plaster the bottom of the pool (which must be done last). Obviously, in my case, at least one of the guys wasn't wearing them. Look it over very well before they leave. And one more thing: They will want to start filling the pool immediately. My research says that the plaster should remain dry for about 6 hours before the water hits it. Look into that. Hope it turns out great!
 

PoolGate

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jun 7, 2017
4,825
Damascus, MD
Try to be there to watch them to make sure. Or hire someone to be there if you can't. There are special spongey things that they are supposed to wear on their feet when they plaster the bottom of the pool (which must be done last). Obviously, in my case, at least one of the guys wasn't wearing them. Look it over very well before they leave. And one more thing: They will want to start filling the pool immediately. My research says that the plaster should remain dry for about 6 hours before the water hits it. Look into that. Hope it turns out great!
I did not know this my builder started filling the exact second they were done plastering.
 

judithleah

Member
Oct 10, 2018
21
Boca Raton, Florida
Good morning, Tim,
I hope everything goes perfectly with your plastering today! I have one more piece of advice. Do a little research about how long you should wait after the pool fills up before actually jumping in. It has to do with the softness of the plaster until it cures, and with the chemicals that are added to clear the plaster dust. Opinions vary from waiting 30 days!! to jumping in right away. We haven't gone into ours yet, and are waiting until this weekend, which will make it about 10 -12 days since the plaster.
Could you do me a favor please, and try to find out (casually) whether the guys who come to plaster are employees of the company or independent subcontractors. That will help me a lot with my situation.
Thanks, and good luck again!
Judy
 

Weedeaterman

Member
Oct 17, 2018
8
FL
Judy thanks for the write up. I am glad I found this forum. I am in the middle of a build now and I am no pool expert, but I do repair submarines and I know leadership and quality of work. the reason I looked a pool forum and questions on items and production of the pool build I thought were not correct. What you are having and experience is my fears from the pool companies. I especially raise an eyebrow when a company says they got it. they also do not want me to have a schedule and dates and times they will be there, that raised my eyebrow as well. So at each of the process I have been there, and I am glad I have been. the diggers tour my yard more than I thought, they then tore up the concrete by dragging the bucket over the concrete so they did not have to shovel and or use a broom so I stopped that but some curb damage already took place. The Rebar guy was 26 years old and thought he knew it all, I did a check on the rebar and some was one 1" from the bottom not the 3" recommended, the twist wire used was not bent over as I said something to him and he made smart comment it was ok and would take too much time to bend them over, I fixed that so the ties do not stick out and then the Gunite team hits them and leaves them shallow so they stick out through the Gunite, Sloppy install, No barrier was used to stop the pool walls from caving in, I fixed some of that, there is standing water that will not drain since no drain was installed and the pump is not picking it up right do this worries me. Not one supervisor ever came on the job and looked asked and or checked the work. I am not happy to say the least. But I will keep posting and updating. Thanks for sharing your headaches with your new pool. We live in a sad time where quality and I care is all time low. Sad. Good luck and enjoy your pool as much as you can. Keep us updated.

Henry
 

jatkinson

Well-known member
Dec 25, 2010
91
The BBB in florida is a JOKE! I wouldn't waste my time with them.

In my experience, plaster guys are usually subs btw.