Easytouch Wiring Help

jvmjr

LifeTime Supporter
Aug 21, 2010
21
Oklahoma
Well, from all the posts I have read it seems to be the consensus that Pentair's instruction manuals are horrible. I have to agree. I am wiring my Easytouch 8 and have called Pentair twice now. I am coming to you guys because you will speak my language and hopefully understand my question. Here it goes - As I understand it my Intelliflow pump is hardwired into a 220 volt (20 amp) circuit breaker. It is then controlled by a low voltage wire from the pump to the Easytouch (ET). Fine, I completely understand this. However, I have read some posts that say you run the pump power through the first relay because that is what turns the pump on/off. Is this true? It would seem the low voltage wire would control this. Now for the two transformers in the ET. One controls the IC40 and one is the transformer for power to the ET itself. This is where I am really confused. I think the ET transformer is wired directly into a breaker. Correct? Does the IC40 get wired directly into a breaker? If so, what controls the IC40? I know the pump must be on for the IC40 to be on so the two need to be connected someway, right? Now, assuming I wire the two transformers directly to the breaker (both can be 220 or 110), can I put both on the SAME 20amp 220v breaker that is powering the pump? The pump's manual says not connect lights or other appliances, fyi. Since I am limited on breaker spaces, I would like to combine the three on one breaker if possible. I can't find how many amps the pump pulls, the IC40 I think is 6 and the ET is 1amp. Thanks in advanced and let me know what else you need to know to help me. Once I can turn everything on, them I will probably be back for programming help. (pool was plastered yesterday, filling right now).
Jay
 

bk406

Well-known member
Dec 3, 2009
2,690
Central Massachusetts
Ok thats a ton of questions! But, i understand why. The manual STINKS to put it mildly.
Lets tackle the 2 transformers first then go back to the pump.

One point first is how the relays work. It's actually pretty straightforward. Each relay is really just a switch thats put between the power from a breaker and the item it controls. The other function is as a way to distribute power. Each relay has 2 lines in (one for 120v, the other for the second hot leg if 240) and 2 loads out if you want to use the relay as a switch.


1) X-former that run the ET box.

Ok, this can be wired a couple different ways. One way is to wire it up on the breaker for the pump. This is generally 240. The black wire and yellow wire are run into the 2 "line in" terminals on the pump relay (labeled "F") (purple wire is capped off). Of course, the 2 "line in" terminals have the 2 hots from the 240 breaker ties in there as well. Really, you could wire nut the 2 hot leads from the breaker to the 2 hot leads from the X-former and a pig to go under the terminal screws. It would be the same if you didnt want to stuff multiple wires under those little screw terminals. This set-up powers the box itself and stays on even if the pump is turned off at the "F" button since its wired into the line in terminal. This way to wire it is fine, but does have a drawback. If you turn off the breaker for the pump, the box goes dead. This means that any other function such as lights, etc thats run by the ET will not work. The better way to power the box, IMO, is to hook the transformer up to a dedicated 15 amp, single pole breaker. Wire it up with black to breaker, purple to neutral bus, and cap the yellow. The disadvantage is that it takes up a breaker slot, but to me, this is the best way to wire the ET box. Each relay doesnt really need a dedicated breaker. You can run more than one off of a single breaker if you dont exceed the capacity for the circuit. Think of a single 20 amp, 120 volt breaker in your house that powers a number of plugs and lights. You would tie in a single 20 amp, 120 volt breaker into say AUX2, and put a jumper wire from line 1 over to line in 1 on the AUX 3 relay. That way, AUX 2 and 3 would be powered off of a single 20 amp breaker with ~2400 watts of power between them. More than enough to run a pool light, etc between them. But I digress.

2) Intellichlor transformer.

This one is best wired up to the 240 breaker that runs the pump. The box comes with the 240 wired up (you have to change the configuration as shown on the inside of the box to go to 120 volts). Wire up the pump breaker with both hot wires from the breaker to "line 1 and line 2" on the pump relay. Now, put the blue wire under one "line in" terminal, and the brown wire to the other "line in" terminal. The IC-40 will have power all the time, powered from the same breaker as the pump. However, even with the pump off, the IC 40 will still have power. Thats ok. When the pump is off, the IC-40 will not function since the flow switch on the IC-40 will kick in and shut the unit down. It's still has power, which is fine, but it wont make chlorine. The IC-40 itself plugs into a port on the bottom of the ET box. This gives the unit power, and lets the ET box control and "talk" to the IC-40.


For a single speed, 240 pump, the breaker is wired into the pump relay as above (each hot goes into each of the 2 "line in" terminals). The 3 wire from the pump then goes in to the "load" side of the relay. One hot from the pump into "load 1" the other hot from the pump into "load 2" and ground into the ground bus. For a 120 volt pump, only one "line" side and one "load" side get used, ground to ground bus, white neutral to neutral bus (for anybody reading this with 120 volt pump).
If you have a 2 speed or variable speed, the ET box needs a relay to take care of this.

I need more info on the pump. Is it single speed, variable speed, 2 speed? Do you have the multispeed relay in the box?

Ok, thats enough for now. Read this and post back. :-D
 

PoolGuyNJ

TFP Expert
May 20, 2007
3,192
South Central NJ
The Intelliflo gets wired directly to the breaker. A second wire, included with the pump, gets connected to a terminal block on the EZT motherboard. The 1st relay is unused.

If you had a single speed pump, it would use the 1st relay.
A two speed pump would require a relay exchange and the control lead from the second relay.

The two transformers can use the same breaker for power. Some people tap the pump power breaker for the IC's transformer. I don't. Somer prefer to power the EZT and IC together. I would never power all three on one breaker.

Scott
 

jvmjr

LifeTime Supporter
Aug 21, 2010
21
Oklahoma
Thanks guys. Great help. So I have the pump wired correctly. So the IC is wired directly into the breaker (per Scott) and the ET controls the IC via the computer board and wire to the IC unit from the ET unit, right? BK, I didn't quite follow your recommendation on the IC. I think you were saying put the IC wires on the hot side of the relay and wire the pump breaker to the hot sides as well. Just another way of doing things ie, it seems to be the same thing as wiring the IC directly into the breaker with the pump. Am I thinking correctly?

So it really doesn't matter if you wire the ET and/or IC as 110 vs 220 (as long as you wire it correctly)? Seems like it would be easy to wire the ET and IC to the same 15 or 20 single pole circuit.

Thanks again.
 

PoolGuyNJ

TFP Expert
May 20, 2007
3,192
South Central NJ
99% of the time, wiring a salt cell's main power from the same breaker as the pump is fine. It's that 1% that draws too much current. Drawing from the same breaker as the controller is much safer.

Do NOT tap a 120VAC lead off a 240V breaker.

Scott
 

bk406

Well-known member
Dec 3, 2009
2,690
Central Massachusetts
jvmjr said:
BK, I didn't quite follow your recommendation on the IC. I think you were saying put the IC wires on the hot side of the relay and wire the pump breaker to the hot sides as well. Just another way of doing things ie, it seems to be the same thing as wiring the IC directly into the breaker with the pump. Am I thinking correctly?
Yea, it's the same thing.

jvmjr said:
So it really doesn't matter if you wire the ET and/or IC as 110 vs 220 (as long as you wire it correctly)? Seems like it would be easy to wire the ET and IC to the same 15 or 20 single pole circuit.
Yes, wiring both transformers to one 15 amp single pole is fine. I think the reason that a lot do not do it this way is that the IC-40 transformer is more difficult to configure to 120 VAC. Unlike the ET x-former which has only 3 wires do deal with, the IC-40 x-former is a little more involved. The x-former comes configured for 240 VAC. So, to change it over, several wires (4 if i remember right) have to be re-matched to allow the blue wire to become a neutral instead of a second hot. For an electrican, most take the fastest route and tie the existing 240VAC into the pump breaker. No fuss, and they are done. Same for the ET x-former. It's pretty easy and fast for an electrician to tie that one into the pump breaker as well. Fast to do, doesnt require an additional breaker, and its done. Not wrong, really, just not the best set up. Of course, you could tie both into the same 240VAC breaker, but that configuration requires a second dipole breaker, and why take up a breaker slot when you dont need to. Mine was originally wired with the ET x-former, the IC-40 x-former, and pump wired together. It was done that way since my pool guy's electrician did the original hook up. I since put the ET x-former on a separate single pole 15 amp breaker, and left the IC-40 on the pump. I shut down the pump in the winter at the breaker. That was fine until my wife wanted another circuit in the yard for christmas lights. I needed the box to operate in the off season since im going to use a relay to control them.

PoolGuyNJ said:
Do NOT tap a 120VAC lead off a 240V breaker.

Scott
Yes. That goes for any panel, not just an ET.
 

Pool Clown

In The Industry
Sep 5, 2008
1,883
Silicon Valley, CA
I agree with all that except, the ic40 should be wired to the load side of the filter pump relay as well as any other appliance that requires power when the pump runs, i.e. heater, external solar control, U.V.(sanitizer) light, etc. Even though the units won't serve their function while the pump is off, the transformers will still run if hooked up to the line side, and transformers do have a service life, and you are only using that up if wired all the time. Also, it's just another safety back up in case flow switches, or pressure switches get stuck (which they do, from time to time)

However, the variable speed pump should be wired hot all the time (Pentairs recomendation), and let the ET control it through it's comm wire.
 

bk406

Well-known member
Dec 3, 2009
2,690
Central Massachusetts
Pool Clown said:
I agree with all that except, the ic40 should be wired to the load side of the filter pump relay as well as any other appliance that requires power when the pump runs, i.e. heater, external solar control, U.V.(sanitizer) light, etc.
If thats the case, you would not wire it like Scott has said and wire both x-formers thru one breaker? It would have to go on the load side for it to be shut off when the pump goes off. Makes sense, actually. So if you had an electronic heater, like a hayward H series for instance, you would wire it for 240VAC and put the 2 hot leads on the load side of the filter pump relay?
An electronic heater and IC-40 dont pull that much power, about 220 watts each if memory serves.
 

jvmjr

LifeTime Supporter
Aug 21, 2010
21
Oklahoma
Thanks for all the help. I will get to try it all out in about a week when the pump gets turned on. Of course it will be a month before the IC gets put to use.
 

bk406

Well-known member
Dec 3, 2009
2,690
Central Massachusetts
Ok, I went out to pentair's site and looked at the wiring instructions for the IC-40 wired to a stand alone power supply. The book says wire the IC-40 power supply to the LOAD side of the pool timer along with the pump. This would mean the IC-40 is only powered when the pump is on. Too bad the instructions for the ET box are not as clear. THX Pool Clown of the pointer. Pentair could really use a good technical writer on the payroll!
 

jvmjr

LifeTime Supporter
Aug 21, 2010
21
Oklahoma
I agree. Their equipment may be good but they aren't spending any money on instruction or manuals. Wiring diagrams would be nice.
 

bk406

Well-known member
Dec 3, 2009
2,690
Central Massachusetts
One thing I forgot to add, each of the breakers in the ET panel should be GFCI breakers. For sure the pool light, convience plug, and any other circuit that powers a light, plug, spa blower, etc. The only exception might be a 1) dipole breaker for a heat pump may not need a GFCI, 2) a pool pump (my area requires a GFCI on the pump), and 3) maybe the ET box x-transformer circuit.
 

Pool Clown

In The Industry
Sep 5, 2008
1,883
Silicon Valley, CA
Yea, I would check to see what the code is in your area before spending the extra money on gfi breakers across the panel. They can be quite expensive compared to non gfi breakers.
 

Pool Clown

In The Industry
Sep 5, 2008
1,883
Silicon Valley, CA
bk406 said:
If thats the case, you would not wire it like Scott has said and wire both x-formers thru one breaker? It would have to go on the load side for it to be shut off when the pump goes off. Makes sense, actually. So if you had an electronic heater, like a hayward H series for instance, you would wire it for 240VAC and put the 2 hot leads on the load side of the filter pump relay?
An electronic heater and IC-40 dont pull that much power, about 220 watts each if memory serves.
Correct, you could use one breaker, just wire the IC40 to the load side. But since the breaker used for the ET doesn't need to go through a relay, that way wont really work. Power the IC40 with the same breaker you use for the pump, as well as a heater,UV, etc. Using a pig tail is fine, Just don't cram a bunch of wires into a breaker (as noted earlier in this thread already).
 

jvmjr

LifeTime Supporter
Aug 21, 2010
21
Oklahoma
A different question. The temperature sensor says to be installed between the pump and filter. This isn't going to work for me. Does anyone have an idea as to the technical reason for the placement? Mine is just a bit too far from the ET box.
 

Pool Clown

In The Industry
Sep 5, 2008
1,883
Silicon Valley, CA
Theoretically, you can put the temp sensor anywhere between the suction side Jandy valve, and the inlet pipe to the heater. Not in the heater, or after the heater.

Between the pump and the filter gives the most accurate temp available (at the equip. pad). Having it after the filter will give a delayed temp reading, which can perhaps be dangerous in spa heating sinarios. By the time "at temp" water reaches the sensor placed after the filter, the heater is allowed to run longer, thus a better chance of heating the small body of water in the spa higher than the set point. However, if you have a pool only, you can put the sensor there.
 

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