dichlor or trichlor

rob42

Member
May 7, 2018
17
Bowie, MD
17,000 gallon, in ground, vinyl liner.

I get that dichlor and trichlor are seen as undesirable because they add CYA. However here is my situation:

I opened the pool a week ago, and it was in terrible shape -- algae and debris -- my cover really failed me last winter.

It is now clean and clear, but is still eating chlorine, and I have like *no* measurable CYA. Here are the numbers:

FC 0, CC 0, CH 50, TA 40, CYA 0, PH 7.2

I just dumped in a gallon of 10% chlorine after these readings.

The issue is that I will run out of liquid chlorine quite quickly, and there is none to be had for 200 miles. I bought some back in April, but it will not last. I can watch the Home Depot and WalMart sites, but I need another plan.

Since trichlor is very easy to get, what is the risk of throwing in a floater and using it for the forseeable future, and just continuing to measure CYA? As it turns out, I actually *need* CYA. It's about time for a new liner anyway, so worst case, I dump the water and go ahead with that.

Thoughts? Tri-chlor until the CYA climbs, then switch to cal-chlor?
 

Texas Splash

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Rob, you're in a tough spot. It sounds like you need to perform a season-opening SLAM Process, but without a supply of liquid chlorine (regular bleach) you're stuck. If you were to start a SLAM today, you need a CYA of 30 right away using granular stabilizer. Once you switch to tri/di-chlor, the CYA will continue to rise, but you'll never maintain the FC SLAM level to keep up. If you skip the formal SLAM and just start using powder now, you'll just limp along and never complete the SLAM Process. Short of a drain and refill, it sounds like a either process might be all you have until you can get chlorine again in your local area.
 

rob42

Member
May 7, 2018
17
Bowie, MD
Well, my pool is clean, my water is clear, my CC is zero, and my CYA is zero. Why not just tri-chlor it to maintain some FC and let the CYA build to a medium range?

I have about 12 gallons of 10% liquid . The other approach would be to add CYA to 30, use what I have, and hope to find more before it runs out.
 

beautifulpool

Silver Supporter
Jun 2, 2019
132
North TX
17,000 gallon, in ground, vinyl liner.

I get that dichlor and trichlor are seen as undesirable because they add CYA. However here is my situation:

I opened the pool a week ago, and it was in terrible shape -- algae and debris -- my cover really failed me last winter.

It is now clean and clear, but is still eating chlorine, and I have like *no* measurable CYA. Here are the numbers:

FC 0, CC 0, CH 50, TA 40, CYA 0, PH 7.2

I just dumped in a gallon of 10% chlorine after these readings.

The issue is that I will run out of liquid chlorine quite quickly, and there is none to be had for 200 miles. I bought some back in April, but it will not last. I can watch the Home Depot and WalMart sites, but I need another plan.

Since trichlor is very easy to get, what is the risk of throwing in a floater and using it for the forseeable future, and just continuing to measure CYA? As it turns out, I actually *need* CYA. It's about time for a new liner anyway, so worst case, I dump the water and go ahead with that.

Thoughts? Tri-chlor until the CYA climbs, then switch to cal-chlor?
Your CH is 50. Use calcium hypochlor for now, until you can get LC.
With Your Current CYA, dichlor and tricolor would be ok, except Since your pH is 7.2 - and your Alkalinity is at 40, 🥴wouldn’t throw more acidity into that mix unless that’s all you had -then u could compensate with soda ash as needed.
 

Wobblerlorri

Bronze Supporter
am i the only one concerned with possible ammonia
0 fc and o cya at opening
No, I was thinking ammonia too. Getting rid of that is going to take more bleach than OP has on hand. @rob42 , have you checked Home Depot, and Lowe's? HD has the pool chlorine, as well as this stuff
In the cleaning supplies dept. Looks like it's 6%. Now I've been maintaining my pool on 6% all season, it works fine, you just have to use more. Desperate times call for desperate measures, you know...