Cracked Filter Housing

CJadamec

TFP Expert
Apr 29, 2016
2,192
Quaker Hill, CT
#2
Yep you need a new one.

All filter styles work well and they all have drawbacks. Get the biggest filter you can afford and fit on your pad. The bigger they are the less you have to clean them.
 

JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 3, 2011
12,677
#6
Pretty much, the only way that that is going to happen is freeze damage.

Was the plug definitely out?
 

Swataz

Active member
May 23, 2013
34
Hauppauge, NY
#7
Actually, the plug was in but I may have just screwed it on there so it wouldn’t get lost after draining it and hosing it thoroughly. I was already in the hole because my filter stop working properly towards the end of last year. Sometimes I really hate owning a pool. Make that most times.

- - - Updated - - -

Not to mention, I will probably have to have my plumbing changed to accommodate a cartridge filter. I’m guessing they do not use those vari-flow valves?
 

Swataz

Active member
May 23, 2013
34
Hauppauge, NY
#9
I don’t doubt that is what happened. It makes sense. Water inside, water expands when frozen. Crack!

I’m just beside myself because I really don’t have the budget to replace both my filter and my pump. However, I don’t really have a choice if I want to use my pool. That’s option three. Let it stay closed this year.
 

Swataz

Active member
May 23, 2013
34
Hauppauge, NY
#11
Well, first, it’s old. I had a local Armature works place refurbish the motor about 15 years ago and have been crossing my fingers ever since. At the end of last year, I was noticing my timer would start things off and I’d look two hours later and it would be lava hot because it was not priming. Now, I attributed this to the pump, but I may be wrong. Maybe somebody with more knowledge in that area can steer me right. It’s also old and loud.
 

JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 3, 2011
12,677
#17
Can't hurt to ask. As long as a qualified installer is willing to "install" it for you, it should be ok.

So, maybe you do most of the work to get everything ready and just leave a little bit to do.

All the power company cares about is that it is done correctly.

Ask an installer how much to install the pump if you do most of the work.

If they have to spend 10 minutes checking that it's correct for a service call, that seems like a good deal.

Maybe have everything lined up with unions and all they have to do is tighten the unions to "install" the pump.

Programming the pump is part of the installation. So, have it programmed so they can see that it's done.

Have all of the paperwork ready so that the installer signs off and you're good.