Anyone tried FIX-A-LEAK?

danbutter

Well-known member
May 3, 2009
105
They say you need to reverse flow to stop suction side leaks...Never thought about doing that, but I don't think there is a setting on my multiport valve to do so....nor do I think pool pumps are designed for that.

It sounds like one of those things that you would do at last resort before having to call a pro in to tear up a ton of concrete anyway.
 

Melt In The Sun

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Oct 29, 2009
3,899
Tucson, AZ
From reading that page, in order to use it on a suction-side leak you have to reverse the flow of water through your plumbing = no trivial task. The good news is that most suction side leaks are above ground. Have you checked all your suction-side above-ground plumbing? The most common place is the strainer basket lid not sealing properly (solution = relube/replace gasket and retighten lid). After that, check glued and especially threaded connections by running a hose over the joint while cupping your hand underneath it. Be sure to allow about 30 seconds per joint. The air bubbles will stop if you get the hose flowing on the leak. Another trick that has worked for some people is to put foam (not gel) shaving cream around all of the connections; if you get it on the leak sometimes a little cone will form where the shaving cream gets sucked in. Good luck!
 

Bama Rambler

Mod Squad
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Jun 22, 2009
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SouthWest Alabama
I'm not making a judgement on whether it will work or not but you'd have to plug off one end of the suction piping (i.e. with a winterizing plug) and configure some way to add pressure to the other end (i.e. a blowout plug).

Also, 48 hours is a long time to go without running your pump so you need to figure some way to circulate the water while it's down.
 

Buckeyemom

Active member
May 22, 2009
32
Marion, Ohio
Bama Rambler said:
I'm not making a judgement on whether it will work or not but you'd have to plug off one end of the suction piping (i.e. with a winterizing plug) and configure some way to add pressure to the other end (i.e. a blowout plug).

Also, 48 hours is a long time to go without running your pump so you need to figure some way to circulate the water while it's down.
What if we run the pump with the filter on recirculate?
 

bk406

Well-known member
Dec 3, 2009
2,690
Central Massachusetts
Buckeyemom said:
What if we run the pump with the filter on recirculate?
All that does it bypass the filter. The pump still pulls water thru the suction lines and out the returns. Under what bama suggests, you could not use the filter pump at all. You would need to circulate the water with a submersible pump of some kind.
 

Richard320

TFP Expert
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Jan 6, 2010
20,852
San Dimas, CA (LA County)
Never heard of it until I read your initial post, but I wouldn't even waste my money trying.

In my profession, I've seen radiator stopleak that doesn't; transmission stop leak that doesn't; power steering stop leak that doesn't; even tire fix-a-flat that won't. All they do is leave a mess behind that has to be cleaned up when you do the repair properly.

What if it's just the lid to the strainer basket? Will you have sealed it tight so that you can't open it again?
 

JasonLion

TFP Expert
Platinum Supporter
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May 7, 2007
37,880
Silver Spring, MD
Fix-A-Leak is the kind of thing you use when the alternative is tearing the pool out of the ground and starting over from scratch, not something to try if there is any other alternative. Definitely try a leak detection service long before you try Fix-A-Leak.
 

Pool Clown

In The Industry
Sep 5, 2008
1,882
Silicon Valley, CA
bk406 said:
Buckeyemom said:
What if we run the pump with the filter on recirculate?
All that does it bypass the filter. The pump still pulls water thru the suction lines and out the returns. Under what bama suggests, you could not use the filter pump at all. You would need to circulate the water with a submersible pump of some kind.
You need to remove your element or put in recirculate with that stuff anyway, or the filter will catch it all and end your leak fixing adventure!
 

mcaron74

LifeTime Supporter
Jul 29, 2011
20
gardiner maine
Still no one has tried this? I am at the point of either resigning myself to above ground plumbing or having to spend thousands on cutting up concrete all the way around a 20x40 lazy L pool with radiant heat in the concrete... wish i knew someone who tried it that it worked for... but dont have much to loose either. Mine is a return side leak by the way.

thanks
 

JasonLion

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May 7, 2007
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Silver Spring, MD
From what I have heard it works about 20% of the time. When they say to bypass the filter they are serious, it will destroy a filter quickly.
 

Pool Clown

In The Industry
Sep 5, 2008
1,882
Silicon Valley, CA
I have tried it. I would say it works more like 40-50% of the time(when used on a low loss leak). I suppose it depends on the type and size of the leak. It wont work on a suction line leak, unless the pump is off. If the pump is off, you won't get the stop leak distributed everywhere like you need. The smaller the loss, the better chance you have with it, i believe.
 

mcaron74

LifeTime Supporter
Jul 29, 2011
20
gardiner maine
Sounds like the only way i am going to find out is to replace my liner first, fill it with watter and then try it huh?

Thanks for the info
 

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