Ackk -just got first month's power bill!

poolnoobgrandma

Well-known member
Sep 15, 2018
123
Seminole, FL
We have a 2 speed Hayward 2 HP pump (think it's this Hayward SP3015X20AZ Super II Inground Pool Pump, 230V, 2 HP, but will check tonight).
For the first month it has run from 9 to 6 daily, plus often in the evenings when we wanted the water features on.
We have an Aquarite T-15 salt cell.
Provided that our CYA is correct and the pool is balanced, what's the minimum amount of time to run the filter to 1) generate daily chlorine, and 2) run the skimmer sufficiently?
Also, the pump only runs through the spa when it's on high, so we have to long enough on high to get that water circulated with the pool water.
Right now I'm thinking one hour on high, 4 hours on low, and set the timer so that the "high" is running at night so that we can enjoy the water features.
I know we'll have to tweak, but we have to start somewhere? Any suggestions?
(full disclosure - we also ran the heatpump some, both for the pool and the spa. - that's a different issue, and I may have to just get used to cool water after a rainy, cloudy day.)


Thanks!
 
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mguzzy

Well-known member
Jul 8, 2015
443
OV, CA
It may not be so much a function of how long you run your equipment but when. My electric company has different rates for different times. I make sure I am running the circulation pumps when the rates are the cheapest. IE in the middle of the night. If we run the spa or water features during the day that is extra.
 

Richard320

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Jan 6, 2010
22,059
San Dimas, CA (LA County)
I believe the poolmath app has a feature to figure out SWG runtime. That will tell you the bare minimum amount of time the pump needs to run every day for the SWG to generate enough FC.

If you don't have a smartphone or the app, then tell us what % you have the SWG set for now for how many hours. If you're running it 10 hours at 50%, you could go 5 hours at 100%. Or some variant.

An hour or so on high to flush the spa -- unless you can program a constant feed that cause it to overflow -- and the rest on as low as possible. How long to get enough skimming you will have to determine by experimentation. Pool School has an article on pump run time that should help explain that.

And as mentioned, tiered rates can also affect the when.
 

poolnoobgrandma

Well-known member
Sep 15, 2018
123
Seminole, FL
Thanks! Looks like we can run the SWG a lot fewer hours and still keep chlorine generation at a good level. Is there any difference, in terms of impacting life of salt cell, between running the system for a short time at a higher percentage, and running it at a longer time at a lower percentage?
 

mknauss

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
Bronze Supporter
May 3, 2014
21,193
Laughlin, NV
In your Poolmath app, Effects of Adding Chemicals, you can use different scenarios to come up with how long to run the pump to generate the chlorine you need each day. That will tell you how much to run your pump. You can generate chlorine during all the phases you mentioned.
 

Richard320

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Jan 6, 2010
22,059
San Dimas, CA (LA County)
Thanks! Looks like we can run the SWG a lot fewer hours and still keep chlorine generation at a good level. Is there any difference, in terms of impacting life of salt cell, between running the system for a short time at a higher percentage, and running it at a longer time at a lower percentage?
The SWG is much like your microwave oven. 50% is not half speed, it's full speed half the time. You can hear it cycling, usually. (The oven, that is) It's all the same to it whether the half time is 12 hours on and 12 off or 5 minutes on and 5 minutes off for twenty four hours.
 

PoolGate

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jun 7, 2017
3,493
Damascus, MD
Yeah pools use a lot of power. Are you on your utility's budget plan? I am and my electric bill went up around $100/month for each month so the pool costs me $1200 a year in additional power. It's better than getting an $800 bill each summer month.
 

cdods

Member
May 24, 2018
16
Smiths Falls, Ontario
If you don't have a smartphone or the app, then tell us what % you have the SWG set for now for how many hours. If you're running it 10 hours at 50%, you could go 5 hours at 100%. Or some variant.
Hmm, I hadn't thought of this. So just to confirm. Currently I run the pump for 8 hours with the SWG at 60%. I could instead run for about 5 hours at 100%, then run at a lower speed for what ever time is needed to filter the water.

Is there any downsides to doing that?
 

poolnoobgrandma

Well-known member
Sep 15, 2018
123
Seminole, FL
Thanks all! I have set the timer for 4 hours on low, 1 hour on high, and SWG to 100%. We'll see how the pool likes it. Also set to run the high setting at night, so we don't have to run it "extra" to get our water features when we are most likely to be in the pool.
 
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Newdude

Well-known member
Jun 16, 2019
460
NY
Also consider upgrading the pump to VS. Even if you dial in your current setup to optimal levels it will still cost you more that way. An $1100 pump is an expense nobody wants if the old pump still works, but it will pay for itself quickly. I have had the conversation with 20 friends who complain anout their electric. Here in NY, most of them pay $100 a month just for the pump. Even after seeing my pump and reading the wattage in person, theyll say 'yeah but $1000 is alot of money'. Put it on a zero interest credit card and make payments to the card instead of the electric company. After a year or so the pump is free and flat out making you money many times over. You will still pay extra for your features and heater but at least you will be making the decision on how much usage/cost.
 
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poolnoobgrandma

Well-known member
Sep 15, 2018
123
Seminole, FL
Brand new pump, brand new pool. We bought what the PB provided. :confused:
We'll look at VS when this one dies (hopefully not for a long time). In the meantime, we'll see how it runs on low speed.
 

Newdude

Well-known member
Jun 16, 2019
460
NY
If its new you can probably sell it for high value on craiglist or letgo. Do the math for your specific situation. How many years you expect it to last times the electric cost. If you see a number that is (just say) $7000, it may make you reconsider. Especially if you can sell the new pump with a small depreciation. My two cents only, just trying to help.
 

Soupy

LifeTime Supporter
Jun 23, 2011
112
Maryland
Also, look to see if your power company provides rebates for energy efficient pumps. That might get the cost down enough to matter.