Replace IC40 with IC40 or...?

khobar

Active member
Jan 27, 2017
35
Mesa
Well, since the water level is high (covering the skimmer intake), and there is algae coating the bottom, I thought about using a vacuum brush to vacuum out at least some of the surface algae. Might be useless, but it will make me feel better. ;)
 

wireform

Silver Supporter
In The Industry
Aug 15, 2017
388
Spring Valley, NY
Well, since the water level is high (covering the skimmer intake), and there is algae coating the bottom, I thought about using a vacuum brush to vacuum out at least some of the surface algae. Might be useless, but it will make me feel better. ;)
Then you can vacuum to waste and not trap the alage in the filter. Take advantage of the high water level.
 
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mknauss

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
Bronze Supporter
May 3, 2014
22,397
Laughlin, NV
You have a cartridge filter. Under normal circumstances, there is now way to vac to waste.

Do you have an equipment pad designed to vac to waste?
 

khobar

Active member
Jan 27, 2017
35
Mesa
No - it has a drain valve I attach a hose to.

Water was too murky to see anything, so I scratched the idea. We had rain predicted for yesterday (didn't happen) and more for today.

On the plus side, I now have 24 gallons of liquid chlorine ready to get started.
 

khobar

Active member
Jan 27, 2017
35
Mesa
Just a status update.

I added 8 gallons of 10% liquid chlorine to my running pool around 8AM with the pumps running full tilt. I waited a couple of hours and checked the chlorine level - 32ppm, overshot.

By around 6PM, chlorine level had dropped to 24ppm. Water was murky but less green.

By 8AM this morning, the chlorine level had dropped to 10ppm. Water is less murky and more blue than green. Added 2 more gallons of 10% liquid chlorine. I'll wait a couple of hours and see where it's at.
 

wireform

Silver Supporter
In The Industry
Aug 15, 2017
388
Spring Valley, NY
Just a status update.

I added 8 gallons of 10% liquid chlorine to my running pool around 8AM with the pumps running full tilt. I waited a couple of hours and checked the chlorine level - 32ppm, overshot.

By around 6PM, chlorine level had dropped to 24ppm. Water was murky but less green.

By 8AM this morning, the chlorine level had dropped to 10ppm. Water is less murky and more blue than green. Added 2 more gallons of 10% liquid chlorine. I'll wait a couple of hours and see where it's at.
In my opinion this is wasted effort along with wasted chlorine. Your not following TFP methods. There's no reason to dump chlorine and overshoot. Figure out how much is needed via poolmath and don't wait that long to check the FC loss. You have to keep the slam going at the your slam target level as long as you can. The more it stays at slam level the quicker the pool will come around and be ready for the OCLT.
 

khobar

Active member
Jan 27, 2017
35
Mesa
Hi.

I put in what I thought would be ballpark, knowing the chlorine level would quickly drop. And it did, as expected, giving me a starting overnight CLT.

Today, I am monitoring and adding chlorine as needed to maintain 24ppm. After adding 2 gals this morning, I tested moments ago - 23ppm. The procedure says not to test too often, so I'll go back in a few hours, check again, and add more chlorine as needed.

The procedure says:
It is best to use bleach or liquid chlorine when SLAMing. You will want to have enough on hand to raise the FC level to shock level at least a couple of times. It is especially important to avoid using dichlor when SLAMing, as it will raise CYA far too quickly.
  • Test the FC level and add enough chlorine to bring FC up to shock level (see here for correct shock level)
    Test and adjust chlorine levels as frequently as practical, but not more than once per hour, and not less than twice a day. Chlorine additions should be frequent, especially at the beginning. Algae and other organic debris will consume chlorine very rapidly at first. As things progress, you will lose less chlorine each cycle and can add chlorine less frequently.
  • Brush and vacuum the entire pool once a day
  • Backwash or clean the filter as needed
  • Vacuum up debris as needed
Now as the murkiness is clearing and I'm starting to see the debris, I'll be able to vacuum it.

Poolmath says I needed only 3 gallons to go from 0-24ppm, so yes, it looks like I might have wasted some chlorine (about $6). If I ever have to do this again (I hope not!), I'll know better.