Raypak R2350

skydude

Bronze Supporter
Mar 26, 2016
51
Phoenix, AZ
I have a 10,000 gallon pool in Phoenix, Arizona. I want to heat the pool during the spring and fall months.

My only source of energy is electric.

From the searching I have done Raypak appears to be the best option.

Is the 2350 model appropriate for this application?

Also, why does the free chlorine need to be below 5ppm when using this heater? I'm just curious, I keep my pool around 2-3ppm.
 

jblizzle

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
May 19, 2010
43,260
Tucson, AZ
:wave: Welcome to TFP!!!

Well, I have no answer for you regarding whether that is appropriate heater.

When exactly do you want to heat it? FYI, I only have solar heating for my pool (no cover) and my pool was over 80 degrees 2 weeks ago. It usually stays warm enough to swim into Oct, although once school starts the use drops dramatically. Add a cover to the solar and you can have a very long season.

I will address the last question though: They state that about the chlorine because they do not understand pool chemistry ;) High chlorine will have very little if any impact on the heater. Low pH is much more destructive. If you do much reading here you will see that very few of the people in the pool industry seem to understand the relationship between FC and CYA as shown in the FC/CYA Chart.
 

pooldv

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
Platinum Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
Aug 10, 2012
25,408
FL panhandle
My first choice would be solar. Otherwise, a heat pump would be the best way to heat your pool with electricity. That looks like a good choice for your pool. It is a good idea to use a solar cover to retain heat over night. 8 mil clear are usually the most recommended.
 

skydude

Bronze Supporter
Mar 26, 2016
51
Phoenix, AZ
:wave: Welcome to TFP!!!

Well, I have no answer for you regarding whether that is appropriate heater.

When exactly do you want to heat it? FYI, I only have solar heating for my pool (no cover) and my pool was over 80 degrees 2 weeks ago. It usually stays warm enough to swim into Oct, although once school starts the use drops dramatically. Add a cover to the solar and you can have a very long season.

I will address the last question though: They state that about the chlorine because they do not understand pool chemistry ;) High chlorine will have very little if any impact on the heater. Low pH is much more destructive. If you do much reading here you will see that very few of the people in the pool industry seem to understand the relationship between FC and CYA as shown in the FC/CYA Chart.
That is great information! I especially like the FC/CYA chart. It's the first time I have ever seen one. I got my CYA measured today and it's at 125. A bit on the high side I guess. I am going to get my own testing equipment soon.

I'll look into solar panels in the future. We get plenty of sun in Phoenix so it makes sense!