Put the pool up...and it's not level by 3 inches

Oct 17, 2016
5
Toledo, OH
Back in 2016 my mother-in law bought a 12 x 12 x 48 Bestway steel pole pool and I set it up on the driveweay. Worked fine and water level was less than 1" difference.

This past Saturday I am told the pool must go up. My mother-in-law had paid a guy to clean out the area where the 24x12 that came with the house had been (long story about listening to pool stores and wrecking a several thousand dollar pool). He leveled the ground, compacted it, and put down a black barrier material that's supposed to keep things from growing up into the pool. This material actually ended up being about 1" short on two sides.

We set the pool up and began filling. Measured with a tape measure and water level at one end is 3.25" higher than the other. This is bad.
Trying to figure out what to do here.
The guy who did the work has agreed to come back out and thinks he needs to dig out some space on the high end. He says he can do this without draining the pool. Reading a lot here I am thinking the pool needs drained, taken down, he needs to level and compact again, and (I think from reading here) use pavers or some type or pressure treated wood under those steel poles. And I think level off the pavers? If we user pavers do they go into the ground so the ground is level with the pavers or put the pavers on the ground and let the pool bag sink in?
I am thinking I should try and find replacements for the plastic feet on the poles that are partially broke.
I am told the goal is to keep this pool up year round, closing it in September and opening in May. We live on the Michigan/Ohio border.

Appreciate all the help.
 

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sammckin

Bronze Supporter
May 9, 2019
407
WV
I'd take it down and level it, then come back with pavers or pt wood level with the ground. 4 inch thick pavers if you're going to go that route. Some prefer wood. You definitely want to disperse the weight on the legs though. I'm not sure about the plastic feet, maybe post a picture.

No idea how he plans to level it without draining and moving the pool but it will be hard to find a new pool at the moment if yours is damaged.
 
Oct 17, 2016
5
Toledo, OH
Thank you both for your replies. Sounds like the pavers are essential and need to be level with each other The guy is coming out tonight to look at it. I'm sure we will drain it
I'm assuming he's going to have to rip out the vegetation barrier he put in to level it. Is that needed? Something more recommended?

Also attached a picture of one of the broken feet. I think 3 or 4 broke.
 

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sammckin

Bronze Supporter
May 9, 2019
407
WV
The barrier isn't necessarily needed but its nice to have. I think you will be ok on the feet issue so long as you use pavers or wood to disperse the weight.
 

bloodfromastone

Well-known member
Apr 11, 2019
120
Buffalo, NY
Looks like your guy's first mistake was ADDING dirt/sand to the low side. Nope. Dead wrong. When setting up on earthen ground, REMOVE dirt from the high side, never add to the low side. Second huge mistake is no pavers or boards. Also, with these pools if you're going to use any sort of sand, masonry sand is best, wet and tamped until compact and level. Then the tarp/ground cloth, then 1/2 inch insulation board for a soft bottom. Sink your paves/boards into the ground, making sure the ground under them is well compacted, and the tops are level with the ground, then check with a 6 foot level that each is level with each other. Use roofing shingles to easy and effectively make small adjustments to level. Set up the pool, Fill to about an inch. Get in and gently kick around the edges to get the bottom of the liner flat with no wrinkles. Take your level and check each leg to be sure they are straight and plumb. Resume filling and frequently throughout filling recheck each leg for straight and plumb(most people don't do this and end up with at least one that's off) until you can no long move the legs. The legs will move while filling, so another piece of advice is set your pavers/boards so that the legs will be off center Towards the pool when it's empty because the legs WILL move out as it fills, and if you center the legs on the pavers, the ledges WILL end up off center toward the outer edge of the paver when filled. The legs will move more outwards as shenanigans in the pool ensues, and you can find your pool legs slipping off the pavers.