Pool shed - heater inside and floor type

LaiMi

Member
Jun 16, 2019
12
Canada
Hi! We are about to have a pool installed and would like to enclose our equipment in a shed. We had a few questions:

1) Should the pool heater be inside if we vent appropriately? It will be next to large trees so there will be lots of leaves falling on equipment.

2) should the flooring for the shed be concrete or wood?

3) would an 8x8 shed be large enough to fit all plus salt bags?

Thank you.
 

YippeeSkippy

Mod Squad
LifeTime Supporter
Jan 17, 2012
11,820
Evans, Georgia
1) Yes if you have a gas heater in there it *must* be properly vented to the outside.
2) Your choice, although cement is much nicer and doesn't rot. Equipment tends to get wet at times when servicing so cement is preferable.
3) Yes, I believe so. Keep in mind other "stuff" like poles, other chemicals, and consider where they will go.

Maddie :flower:
 
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ajw22

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jul 21, 2013
11,299
Northern NJ
The heater exhaust must be vented through the roof of the shed and the heater must have sufficient air intake though windows or louvered doors. Pool heaters take a lot of air in. We have seen heaters in shed that did not perform properly because they could not get sufficient intake air.

You also need to leave enough room on the sides of heaters and other equipment for maintenance access. Leave space to walk and work in between equipment.

Depending on the type of filter you get, some filters get the surrounding area wet during maintenance more than others.

Don't bury pool PVC plumbing under concrete where you can't easily dig down to the pipes. Bring the pipes up through crushed stone.
 

LaiMi

Member
Jun 16, 2019
12
Canada
The heater exhaust must be vented through the roof of the shed and the heater must have sufficient air intake though windows or louvered doors. Pool heaters take a lot of air in. We have seen heaters in shed that did not perform properly because they could not get sufficient intake air.

You also need to leave enough room on the sides of heaters and other equipment for maintenance access. Leave space to walk and work in between equipment.

Depending on the type of filter you get, some filters get the surrounding area wet during maintenance more than others.

Don't bury pool PVC plumbing under concrete where you can't easily dig down to the pipes. Bring the pipes up through crushed stone.
Thanks so much. If we kept the heater outside to allow for extra air flow and ventilation, is there any danger with all the leaves falling for on the heater? Our pool builder would be putting in a venting kit into the shed which I believe would be installed by the natural gas installers.
 

LaiMi

Member
Jun 16, 2019
12
Canada
1) Yes if you have a gas heater in there it *must* be properly vented to the outside.
2) Your choice, although cement is much nicer and doesn't rot. Equipment tends to get wet at times when servicing so cement is preferable.
3) Yes, I believe so. Keep in mind other "stuff" like poles, other chemicals, and consider where they will go.

Maddie :flower:
Great thank you. We were debating placing the gas heater behind the shed outside but read you need to keep debris and leaves off the heater which would be annoying given they’re up against a tree line.
 

ajw22

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jul 21, 2013
11,299
Northern NJ
Thanks so much. If we kept the heater outside to allow for extra air flow and ventilation, is there any danger with all the leaves falling for on the heater? Our pool builder would be putting in a venting kit into the shed which I believe would be installed by the natural gas installers.
A venting kit covers exhaust gas. It typically contains nothing for combustion air. The design of the shed has to account for it.

You have to check pool equipment every few days. A quick blow with a leaf blower clears leaves away. Most heaters are sealed and leaves around them are not a fire hazard.
 

JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
16,775
If you put the heater inside, I would not use a wood floor. The floor should be non-combustible.

In addition, water will get on the floor and wood will begin to rot once it gets wet.

I would go bigger than 8 x 8. I think that 10 x 12 would be better.
 

Newdude

Well-known member
Jun 16, 2019
1,510
NY
If you put the heater inside, I would not use a wood floor. The floor should be non-combustible.

In addition, water will get on the floor and wood will begin to rot once it gets wet.

Depending on the ambient temperature and humidity, my heat pump can dump a gallon or two of sweat/condensation in an hour. I imagine a gas heater would do the same so the wood floor would not last for sure.
 

Chickinvic

Well-known member
Jul 12, 2017
273
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Thanks so much. If we kept the heater outside to allow for extra air flow and ventilation, is there any danger with all the leaves falling for on the heater? Our pool builder would be putting in a venting kit into the shed which I believe would be installed by the natural gas installers.
Our heater is outside and we have loads of trees and debris that can get on it. That hasn't been an issue. You can unscrew the top and clean it out from time to time?
 

jimmythegreek

TFP Expert
Bronze Supporter
In The Industry
Aug 10, 2017
1,391
Morris Cnty NJ
Stone base so you can access the pipes in future. 10x10 is minimum x12 is better as said. The leaves wont bother it you can build a metal shed roof over it a ways up above the flu exit