pool modification

JFP

Member
Aug 9, 2007
19
#1
This may be an off the wall question but here goes. Our pool is big; too big. We inherited it when we bought the house. The amount of maint. and expense is not worth it for two people in New England.
Is there any way to modify it to make it shorter/less deep? I know it sounds weird but the alternative is to destroy it and rebuild or turn it into a large flowerpot. PS I just put in 60 pounds of "stuff" to raise the hardness to the minimum level. Enough already!
 

The Mermaid Queen

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Mar 28, 2007
2,522
Northern KY
#4
Is the pool old? is the surface in poor repair? I would probably deal with it until I needed to resurface it, and then do a major overhaul. Other than that I have no advice for you!
 

Butterfly

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
May 31, 2007
10,045
South Carolina
#5
Well, I kinda' remember someone wanting to "raise the floor" in their pool to do away w/the deep end. In fact, DH & I wished we had thought of that before we replastered ours.

More folks will chime in before too long. This is a busy weekend for most :lol: so you will probably get lots more replies during the week days.
 

JFP

Member
Aug 9, 2007
19
#6
The Mermaid Queen said:
Is the pool old? is the surface in poor repair? I would probably deal with it until I needed to resurface it, and then do a major overhaul. Other than that I have no advice for you!
The pool was built in the 60's but is in good shape. It is a Wagner pool which I am told is a top of the line in-ground pool. I am not impressed!
 

stever

LifeTime Supporter
#7
Looking at Wagner's web site -- assuming it's the same company -- they are pushing the in-floor cleaning system. I don't know if that was invented yet in the 60's.... but would be a factor in raising the floor.

I don't see any problem with filling in a portion of the pool in depth, strip the plaster, extend the bottom drain up, throw in some properly compacted material, have them chip into the sides where the new bottom comes in so the new shotcrete does not feather out too thin, epoxy dowel some reinforcing bars in, shotcrete a new surface, plaster the whole thing and fill.

Still cheaper than a new pool -- but not free!

Making the pool smaller in perimeter is another story -- I wouldn't do it. It would be a mess with the plumbing and what do you do with the old walls? No good way to do this.

Steve
 

waste

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Mar 29, 2007
4,160
Coastalish 'down easter'
#8
I've changed pools both ways - to become less perimeter (more expensive) and shallower. If you'll tell me what you have and what you're looking to end up with - I can provide some info on what's involved :) Either way, you are looking at more $ than dumping $60 worth of chems in the pool!
 

JFP

Member
Aug 9, 2007
19
#9
waste said:
I've changed pools both ways - to become less perimeter (more expensive) and shallower. If you'll tell me what you have and what you're looking to end up with - I can provide some info on what's involved :) Either way, you are looking at more $ than dumping $60 worth of chems in the pool!
Since it is kidney shaped and long; I would shorten it by about 10 feet and reduce the deep end to no more than 6ft. It's now 9ft. My guess is it's probably as expensive as putting in a new one.
 

Exchemist

Well-known member
Oct 5, 2007
86
Philadelphia, PA
#10
Here's what is probably a crazy idea: Build an island in the pool. Depending on the layout, this could cut the volume by 30% and shouldn't require as much effort as shrinking the perimeter. You could leave the inside open and use it as a swim up bar or fill it in and landscape it. It could look good and be fun.

Any thoughts if this is feasible?
 

JasonLion

TFP Expert
Platinum Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
May 7, 2007
37,879
Silver Spring, MD
#11
Adding an island is possible, as is shortening the length. Neither is a small change, you are talking serious money, but neither is going to cost as much as a new pool. Making a pool shallower is also possible and not as difficult as the island or perimeter change but again serious money. All three of these projects involve structural changes and new plaster, and most likely plumbing changes.