Pool in a Tent...High Humidity, Gas Build-up...Help please.

pbolden

Member
Feb 6, 2017
10
columbus ohio
Hello Everyone,

I have a small inground fiberglass pool (9x18x4). To swim during the winter I enclosed the pool with a 10x20 polyethylene tent. The issues are a lack of ventilation and high humidity levels.

Because of the lack of adequate ventilation there is irritatingly high levels of fumes particularly after shocking. There are also high levels of condensation which have water dripping everywhere thus rust and mold are a concern.

Three Solutions as I see it. 1) Scrap the tent idea altogether. 2) Add vents to the ceiling and ground levels. 3) Add a high capacity dehumidifier (50 pt.) and vent the discharged air to the outside while returning the water to the pool.

Solution 3 is my preferred option. The high capacity dehumidifier is rated for 4,500 sq.ft. The tent is 200 sq. ft. or 2,000 cu.ft. and the ability to vent the exhaust outdoors should greatly reduce the build-up of gases in the air. As an FYI, I would disconnect the dehumidifier while people are swimming.

Any thoughts, ideas or additional solutions are GREATLY APPRECIATED! Thanks for your help.
 

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Arizonarob

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Mar 25, 2018
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The problem with the dehumidifier is it’s not just plain humidity. Like you are noticing, the humidity is chemical laden, and will most likely destroy that dehumidifier in no time.

Venting is your only option, especially during chemical additions. You can always place a solar cover on your pool to help keep it warm while you are venting the tent.

Let me see what are chem guru has to say. Hang tight. @JoyfulNoise
 

JoyfulNoise

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May 23, 2015
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Tucson, AZ
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You shouldn’t be shocking the pool regularly. Are you maintaining the pool using the TFP methodology? It sounds like you have issues with chloramines. Please post current test results.

Physically speaking you need two things in your setup - dehumidification and ventilation (exhaust & fresh air makeup). Without control over those, you are going to have huge mold and rust issues.

Also, when not in use, the pool should be covered with a well-fitted bubble cover and the water temperature should be kept as low as possible to avoid evaporation. Only heat the pool when you plan to use it.
 

jseyfert3

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Oct 20, 2017
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Add a high capacity dehumidifier (50 pt.) and vent the discharged air to the outside while returning the water to the pool.
That’s not how dehumidifiers work. For a compressor driven dehumidifier, the humid air is pulled into the unit and it first flows over a cold coil. The coil causes humidity to condense on the coil, just like water condenses on the outside glass of ice water. This condensed water then drips off the coils and is collected in a bucket or drains away. The air, now with much less humidity than before, continues flowing over a hot coil, where the heat that was removed from the cold coil plus inefficiencies cause the air to warm up somewhat. This somewhat warmer, but much drier air is then discharged from the dehumidifier unit.

If you discharge the air from a dehumidifier to outside the tent, then you are paying money to dehumidify air that you promptly exhaust outside. In short, this would be one expensive vent fan. A vent fan would be the first thing to start with, to ensure any fumes are removed, and once sufficient ventilation is obtained a dehumidifier that is NOT exhausted outside could be used for further humidity control.
 
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pbolden

Member
Feb 6, 2017
10
columbus ohio
WOW guys...a lot to take in. I am gone most of the Spring, Summer and Fall and the only chance for me to use the pool would be in the Winter. As a result the pool has been closed for a couple of years and I just opened it last week which is why the pool was shocked and the chlorine levels are so high. Technically, the pool is being opened and I am bringing the pool chemistry in line. Once that is accomplished I believe the out gassing will be with in tolerable levels (am I wrong)? For example, I keep the pool warm at about 86 degrees F so my target Chlorine level is 3.0 ppm. With that in consideration, would having a dehumidifier not venting to the outside but recirculating the air inside be reasonable?

Current Stats:
TC 10.0 (after Shock)
FC 10.0 (after Shock)
PH 7.5
TA 70
TH 300
Stabilizer 20
 

duraleigh

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Sorry to be a killjoy but option one is your best bet. Attempts to override mother nature when she is dead set working against you are almost always futile.

If you had a hard enclosure a dehumidifier would be possible but that thin barrier of plastic is gonna condensate moisture right back inside your enclosure.

You can improve it somewhat but I don't think you can overcome the obstacle unless you go to much more expense (build an insulated enclosure)
 

JoyfulNoise

TFP Expert
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May 23, 2015
17,530
Tucson, AZ
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well, it certainly is an experiment. This is probably one of the most extensive threads on trying to operate a “domed” pool in a cold climate. As you can read, @Swampwoman went through some extensive modifications (and failures) to get her pool operational -

 
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markayash

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Mar 21, 2016
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Atlanta Ga
I am allergic to mold and going to an indoor commercial pool caused me to get sick as a dog. Luckily I got over it the next day so be careful.
 

swimcmp

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Nov 8, 2011
1,091
Moberly,MO
Look for a polycrylic accordian style cover. It is pretty resilient and can be rolled back off the pool when the weather is nice but then rolled over the pool in the winter
 

sktn77a

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May 16, 2010
1,968
Chapel Hill, NC
Get some ventilation (holes in the top of the gable end walls) in the tent first. If that works, great, if it doesn't go to the next steps.
You are over-chlorinating your pool - thats why the irritation. Given you have a tent over the pool (no direct sunlight) your stabilizer is fine and your chlorine could be around 1-2 for adequate sanitation.