Pool closing in Northeast

Pamelalocke

Member
Jun 30, 2020
17
Lockport ny
can someone please give a very detailed description on how to close a pool with a sand filter in the northeast. I am a novice and have no idea what to do. I thought I had seen such a description but now I cannot find it. Thank you.
 

Catanzaro

Platinum Supporter
TFP Guide
Jul 30, 2014
3,470
Monmouth County, New Jersey
Pamela, look at the sticky in this section. The best thing to do is actually upload some pictures if you need help closing your pool. You will need an air compressor or professional pool blower and a helping hand. If you have no main drain, then you can easily use a shop vac. Please describe your pool, etc.
 

MommaHuffman

Active member
Jul 28, 2020
28
Palmyra, PA
Thank you for that tid bit! I also have a sand filter and was thinking I would have to bring the whole thing indoors for winter. Question....do you replace the sand each year or can I reuse the sand?
 

ghall6292

Bronze Supporter
Jun 10, 2018
68
North Central PA
MommaHuffman,

I used to worry about that as well. Actually, you would probably never have to change the sand. I would do it if I ever replaced the filter, but only then.

Think about it...the ocean pounds this sand for millions of years, then we harvest it, bag it, and sell it to pool owners. According to the pool store, NEW sand has much sharper edges than OLD sand. Thus, you should change it every couple years. In reality, if it came with "sharp" edges when you bought it, a few years inside your pool filter cannot possibly affect it like a few thousand or million years of bashing against rocks, beaches, coastlines, etc.

Welcome to TFP. Consider becoming a supporter when you can. You can easily pay for it with all the money these folks on this site will save you.
 
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Catanzaro

Platinum Supporter
TFP Guide
Jul 30, 2014
3,470
Monmouth County, New Jersey
The only time I would recommend ever changing the sand is if the person used "magic potions" and clarifiers, and/or the ground near the pump would just flood the whole area. I have not cleaned my sand since the 2015 build, but I have to figure out a way to have the water drain on the grass and down the hill, if my filtering capacity ever diminishes.

I was thinking about heavy duty tarps, etc. When the time comes I will figure it out, but the water remains very clear and working perfectly fine. The other thing I do is during closing, I backwash for at least 5 minutes to really stir up the sand, then rinse for about one minute. Then I put on recirculate to clear the lines.
 

Duxdweller

Member
Jun 10, 2012
16
I remove my pump and put it in the basement. The sand filter stays put with the drain plug removed. Blow out the lines.
@Spitdog Are you completely removing the pump (like an intelliflo) and bringing it inside? Sounds like a good idea - and don't know why I have never done that! Anyone else remove theirs in the winter?
 

Newdude

Well-known member
Jun 16, 2019
4,566
NY
Anyone else remove theirs in the winter?
I always brought mine inside. Many people don’t and it can withstand the elements just fine, but when I saw the itemized cost for the equipment there was no WAY I was leaving it out when it was so easy to move to the garage or basement.

I can’t say for sure if it’s just coincidental or not, but I never had any drips or leaks during the season. I believe it helped that the whole pad got reinstalled with new lube on all the the O-rings each year.

I am in the other (warm) corner of NY compared to OP in Lockport by Niagara/Buffalo but we still get plenty cold here at times. If I was in the southern half of the country it probably wouldn’t bother me to leave everything outside.
 
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Catanzaro

Platinum Supporter
TFP Guide
Jul 30, 2014
3,470
Monmouth County, New Jersey
My pool was built in 11-2013, and then closed during construction. Pump not in use until spring of 2014. Pump left outside from 11-2013 until 05-2018. Pump technically lasted 4 years. It looked really bad. Upon start up, the pump would not turn over. Tried a new capacitor, with no luck (have extra's now). Left out in the snow and rain for 4 years.

Skip ahead. Now, we have finished 2018, 2019, and the 2020 season. What I did is create new piping and unions. I remove the pump and wiring and put back the old pump before closing my pool, without the motor. In the 3 years, the pumps looks pretty good. Not faded at all, compared to the old pump after 3 years.

Again, only time will tell, but if the pump makes it another season, then it is the same break even point. After that, the pump will have lasted 5 years. In a few years, I can report back and see if brining a pump inside makes any bit of a difference for its longevity.

Once the motor calls it quits, I will only replace the motor and not purchase the whole unit. Did this so I can have a back up during winter months.