Patio material that stays coolest

friguy3

Well-known member
Jul 5, 2014
99
Manalapan, New Jersey
We have had a pool for 3ish years and have pavers, reddish dark, probably "generic pavers", and during the summer they can get a little hot. We now want to extend our patio and dont want to spend the 20k to. What are the other options that do not get hot. Thought about concrete and use my pavers in-between to make a pattern, but heard poured concrete can get hot (and some dark stone which is probably expensive and we arent using, can get very hot too). Ive read about acrylic and kooldeck and there's some pros and cons. Personally, I dont love the "orange peel" effect of the kooldeck. And have read acrylic coatings can be slippery (not sure how slippery we are really talking). Brushed concrete? Travertine (would this be more expensive than pavers and I cant use my existing patio pavers)? Would love any ideas and experiences.
 

pooldv

TFP Expert
Platinum Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
Moderator Emeritus
Aug 10, 2012
25,412
FL panhandle
My rocksalt finish, stained concrete is the coolest surface around my pool. Flagstone, rocks and old bricks are all noticeably hotter. It is also maintenance free.
 

outdoorsgal

LifeTime Supporter
Jan 24, 2015
692
Phoenix, AZ
i've gotta say, i live in phx and my marbella is cool. i'm slightly regretting not having made the rest of the patio marbella but i wanted old chicago brick for more of a different look under the grape arbor. plus less $ and i can do it myself. i'll prob put an outdoor rug on it though! this is me only with a month of experience but i know someone else who's had it a few yrs in phoenix and loves it
 

grottoguy

LifeTime Supporter
Aug 24, 2014
462
NJ
I live in NJ and have a Marble coping and it is as cool as can be. I think Marble is very much like Travertine. I have techo block inca pavers for the decking and they are not as cool as the Marble but my feet never feel hot on it. I also have a border of small brick around the techo block and that is very hot. Fortunately it is a small area I can easily avoid.
 

chiefwej

LifeTime Supporter
TFP Guide
Jun 12, 2011
3,531
Tucson
I have acrylic coated concrete. It's almost as cool as cool deck, but is much more durable. Ten years old and I have just resealed it with a new coat of the color coat. One day's work and it now looks like the day it was first installed. It has held up much better than my neighbors cool deck, which started peeling after about five years. It is also non-porous, so no staining or salt damage.

On the advice of my pool builder, I avoided the use of any natural stone, since this was built as a salt pool. There is no deck surface that you can walk on bare foot in the sun her in Tucson, but this as close as any. You can have it textured and tinted to match brick, travertine, flagstone, or any material you chose. The only limit is the skill and experience of the installer. Oh, and it's not slippery if there is any texture at all. I suppose It might be if you make it completely smooth, but I've never seen that done.
 

ewkearns

Well-known member
Aug 19, 2014
693
Shallotte, NC
I've found that the material is far less important than the reflectivity of the material. If light is absorbed it WILL make [whatever] surface HOT. I actually have a wood deck that gets too hot to walk on. Repainting with a much lighter color is toward the top of my to-do list....
 

chiefwej

LifeTime Supporter
TFP Guide
Jun 12, 2011
3,531
Tucson
Hi chiefwej, What did your PB say the salt system in the pool would do to stone? Thanks
Over time salt water splash out causes erosion. Softer more porous stone like flagstone will flake and erode much more quickly, and harder stone will hold up better, but all stone can suffer damage. Salt laden water wets the stone. Any moisture penetration evaporates, leaving salt behind. As the water evaporates, salt crystals form within the stone, causing damage and creating fractures that allow more penetration.
 

JupPool

Well-known member
Jun 8, 2015
74
Florida
We have travertine pavers. They are ivory which is a lighter color and you can lay on your back shirtless at the hottest time of day. You could not even stand in one spot with our old concrete pavers.
 

chiefwej

LifeTime Supporter
TFP Guide
Jun 12, 2011
3,531
Tucson
We have travertine pavers. They are ivory which is a lighter color and you can lay on your back shirtless at the hottest time of day. You could not even stand in one spot with our old concrete pavers.
Try that in Tucson and you will leave the skin from your back there. I don't care what surface you have, here you won't be laying on it shirtless.
 

ITR

Gold Supporter
Nov 8, 2014
323
Clermont, FL

kpischel

LifeTime Supporter
Jul 13, 2015
27
Scottsdale, AZ
i've gotta say, i live in phx and my marbella is cool.
Hi outdoorsgal... I was looking at paver material and was at one of the largest pool builders in the Phoenix area looking at their paver display... I could walk on the various materials barefoot to compare... travertine and marbella were the coolest by far. Later I was at a stone supplier and asked about marbella and was told it was much softer and porous than travertine... what has your experience been with the marbella thus far? Thanks. Kirk
 

JessB412

Gold Supporter
I have acrylic coated concrete. It's almost as cool as cool deck, but is much more durable. Ten years old and I have just resealed it with a new coat of the color coat. One day's work and it now looks like the day it was first installed. It has held up much better than my neighbors cool deck, which started peeling after about five years. It is also non-porous, so no staining or salt damage.

On the advice of my pool builder, I avoided the use of any natural stone, since this was built as a salt pool. There is no deck surface that you can walk on bare foot in the sun her in Tucson, but this as close as any. You can have it textured and tinted to match brick, travertine, flagstone, or any material you chose. The only limit is the skill and experience of the installer. Oh, and it's not slippery if there is any texture at all. I suppose It might be if you make it completely smooth, but I've never seen that done.

I know NOTHING about concrete so sorry if this is a silly question - is "acrylic coated concrete" just poured concrete with a special sealer on top? We are deciding on our patio now and we are maxed out on our budge but we are having a fairly large concrete patio poured (1200sq ft) and want to keep it as cool as I can. It is going to be a salt water pool. I'm just curious if my husband and I can buy the special acrylic sealer or if it has to be done by an installer.
 

chiefwej

LifeTime Supporter
TFP Guide
Jun 12, 2011
3,531
Tucson
The textured acrylic coated deck is a three step process that was professionally installed. The base coat is a primer/bonding agent. Then the texture coat is sprayed on and troweled for a “knock down” texture, similar to stucco. Finally a color top coat is rolled on which seals and provides a durable wear layer. Both the process and final appearance are very similar to Kool Deck.

Maintenance requires touching up any chip or cracks with color top coat, in order to keep any water from getting under the coating and causing peeling. In addition you should apply a full new top coat to the entire deck after several years. My deck, although 13 years old, still looks like it did when installed. But I have been careful to keep it touched up and have recoated once (about 3 years ago).