New (to us) Home with In Ground Pool

s_dubb

Well-known member
May 24, 2019
75
South West, Arizona
Just purchased a home with an in ground pool, The past 12 years have always had an above ground pool. I have dipped my toes in the TFP area for awhile but never went full force, just kind of read information over the past years to get an idea of what was being done. Well now I am going in all the way. Just purchased the TF100 Kit, was just using the cheap Walmart kit to test Chlorine and PH on my above ground pools. I have been using Walmart Liquid Chlorine the past few years this is the 10% where the bleach is only 6% and only slightly cheaper. The previous owner left test strips so I am just using those to get an idea til my test kit comes. The water looks really good so thats a plus! I have been running the Pump everyday from 11PM-7AM (8 HRS) so were the previous owners, seems like this is the norm this would be 2 full cycles of the pool, does this sound good or can I cut it back? Any info along the way is greatly appreciated.
 

thetekgeek

Bronze Supporter
Jun 8, 2018
166
Nebraska
Welcome to the forum. Good job on the test kit. It'll save you headaches, money and give you peace of mind that you can manage your water correctly. Do you know anything about how the pool was maintained before you bought the house? If not, I would certainly recommend getting a CYA test performed as soon as the kit arrives.
 

s_dubb

Well-known member
May 24, 2019
75
South West, Arizona
I was able to talk to the previous owner for a little bit about the pool, he stated they would just take their water to the local pool store, have it tested, then they would buy whatever they told them to buy and add whatever they told them to put in it. I did notice a lot off black streaks going down the side wall in a bunch of places (black algae?) He did also state that they were going to drain the pool, chlorine wash, and do a complete refill for this summer but because of the move they never did it.
 

thetekgeek

Bronze Supporter
Jun 8, 2018
166
Nebraska
Hopefully, the water is in a decent balance but I would doubt it. Rest assured that when your kit arrives and you can do your own testing the folks here will be able to take you through whatever needs to be done in order to make that pool trouble free for you. Have you studied pool school and the ABC's of water chemistry? That would be a great place to start while you wait for your kit to arrive.
 

s_dubb

Well-known member
May 24, 2019
75
South West, Arizona
Yes I have studied pool school and the ABC's of water chemistry. Looks like my kit wont be here til Monday. Is there anything I can do in the meantime? I know you guys dont like the test strips but they left a bunch here. I did use a couple of them to see where I was at. Chlorine is low but all my other readings look fine. Cant wait til my TF100 kit shows up so I can start seeing where I am at with this.
 

thetekgeek

Bronze Supporter
Jun 8, 2018
166
Nebraska
If it was me, I would use pool math to calculate the size of pool you have. Then I would add 3-4 ppm liquid chlorine to the pool each day until your kit arrives. Once it arrives, post a full set of test results.
 

s_dubb

Well-known member
May 24, 2019
75
South West, Arizona
My kit arrived a couple of days early. I did my first test today and still learning. Here are my results.

FC 1.5
CC 1
TA 170
pH 7.2
CH 1,250
CYA greater than 100 (could not even reach the first mark of 100 before the dot was gone)
 
Last edited:

thetekgeek

Bronze Supporter
Jun 8, 2018
166
Nebraska
Your CYA may be well over 200. You can do the diluted CYA test and see if that gets you a more valid number. I’m not good with links, but search for the TF100 extended directions. It looks like you’ve probably found the reason that the previous owner was going to do a drain/refill. You’re going to need to exchange a good portion of your water in order to make it manageable. The exact amount I can’t tell you until we have a closer CYA level.
 

Flying Tivo

Well-known member
Jan 24, 2017
1,108
Monterrey, NL, Mexico
Nothing wrong, this is exactly why we recommend self testing. We trust your first tests more than the pool store pros. You are in for a full water exchange. I would not add any more chemicals as of now, it will only be a waste. Rent a sump pump from HD or Lowes, find where you can dump all that water(drain, street or creek). If Temps are getting high in Az, make sure you maintain the pebble surface wet as to not dry and crack under the heat. Also test your fill water to know what chemicals you will need in hand after refill.
 

s_dubb

Well-known member
May 24, 2019
75
South West, Arizona
Yeah I was afraid of this. Yes temps are rising here, should hit triple digits (100) on Wednesday. Is the sump pump the way to go? I see that you can drain the pool with that hose bib connected to the filter or is this just if your draining small amounts (rain)
As for testing the fill water is their a link for this? I am unsure how I go about that. Would be great to know what to start putting into it when its filled.
 

thetekgeek

Bronze Supporter
Jun 8, 2018
166
Nebraska
Yep. Looks like a full water exchange. You’ll thank yourself for doing it. Water with CYA that high is completely unmanageable due to the high chlorine it will demand.
 

thetekgeek

Bronze Supporter
Jun 8, 2018
166
Nebraska
To test your fill water, just pull water from your tap and test it, unless you’re gonna have water trucked in. Skip CYA because it will be zero.
 

mknauss

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
Bronze Supporter
May 3, 2014
22,404
Laughlin, NV
Here it is --

You can exchange some water without draining.

If you place a low volume sub pump in the deep end and pull water from there while adding water in the shallow end (through a skimmer or into a bucket on a step so you lessen the water disturbance) you can do a fairly efficient exchange. That is assuming the water you are filling with is the same temperature or warmer than your pool water. If your fill water is much cooler than your pool water, then switch it. Add the water to the deep end (hose on bottom) and pull water from the top step.

The location of the pump and fill hose may change if you have salt water, high calcium, etc.
In my pool, with saltwater and high calcium when I drain, I put the pump in the deep end and hose in shallow end. The water in the pool weighs more per unit volume than the fill water from the hose.

Be sure to balance the water out and water in so the pool level stays the same. Also be sure your pool pump is disabled during this process. Once started do not stop until you have exchanged the amount of water you wish.
 

s_dubb

Well-known member
May 24, 2019
75
South West, Arizona
@mknauss a few questions before I start the exchange
1. the pump cord is not long enough to reach the bottom of the deep end, just need to get it as deep as I can?
2.can it be on the side or does it need to be in the middle (would it be best to have the fill in the corner on the step and the pump the opposite corner deep end)
3. does the pool float fill water need to be also shut off?
 

mknauss

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
Bronze Supporter
May 3, 2014
22,404
Laughlin, NV
Get the pump as deep as you can. Are you doing a partial exchange?
Does not matter where, just as deep as possible.
Auto fill should be turned off
 

s_dubb

Well-known member
May 24, 2019
75
South West, Arizona
will try to do at least 50% water exchange, If I can do at least 78-80 I will but the wife is questioning this procedure and the kids want to swim. I told her its the best option considering the time of year and if we dont do something now we will be fighting it all summer. She stated just have that company come in and do the complete drain, acid wash, chlorine wash, and blast the tile. I told her its to risky but she says I am just being paranoid.