New build pump pad

Jimrahbe

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Jul 7, 2014
17,965
Bedford, TX
2,

If you tell us what each pipe is for, we can probably show you a better valve set up..

I personally see no reason to have any valves on the return lines unless they go to water features that you want to be able to turn on and off. If the four valve you currently have go to pool returns, then they are not really needed.

Thanks,

Jim R.
 

jimmythegreek

TFP Expert
Bronze Supporter
In The Industry
Aug 10, 2017
2,501
Morris Cnty NJ
It's actually good to put a 2way diverter on every return. One day a pipe cracks and you have no way to fix and the system is crippled. With home runs and valves you shut off one feed or return and keep going to fix whenever you can or not at all. Looks good overall I will point one thing out. Make all your manifolds out of 2" and drop into 1.5 for the returns at the manifold easily by going 2" to outside of valve and 1.5" to inside no bushings needed they are made that way. Also try to not make a trident as the supply side you show. Water from middle feed will take most flow and be less on outside Ls unless you plan on it that way. I always come in one end and go down the line with Ts. A 3way is ok for me when 2 inputs or outputs is all that's needed. I'm a fan or sweeps on everything suction side on returns it doesn't matter. A 1" line can feed a 3/4" eyeball by itself so 1.25 or 1.5 is fine for returns and we mostly use 1.5 because the wall fittings accept that size standard and PVC is cheap
 

ImLon2

Active member
You have 7 pipes coming out of the ground. What is each for?

Where are you going to run the waste line from your filter to?
2 skimmers 1 main drain

On the 4 returns lines 3 will be full and 1 return line that will be split to two at the steps just to help move debris.

Backwash/waste will go into a drain line I’m putting in that will allow the water to get away from the pool, yard, and house.
 

Jimrahbe

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Jul 7, 2014
17,965
Bedford, TX
t's actually good to put a 2way diverter on every return. One day a pipe cracks and you have no way to fix and the system is crippled.
In your experience, out of 100,000 pools how many will eventually develop a problem with one return line? One or two??? I just do not see this as a major or even common problem.

That said, other than a few bucks for a few feet of extra pipe and the valves, it sure can't hurt.

Edit... I just read the OP's comments about blowing out lines for the winter.. Sorry, I lead a sheltered life down here in Texas... :mrgreen:

Thanks,

Jim R.
 

ajw22

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jul 21, 2013
18,162
Northern NJ
2 skimmers 1 main drain

On the 4 returns lines 3 will be full and 1 return line that will be split to two at the steps just to help move debris.

Backwash/waste will go into a drain line I’m putting in that will allow the water to get away from the pool, yard, and house.
Look at this plumbing pic and the way 3 way valves were used as a T fitting and a valve.

First post and about to sign a contract after 4 estimates.
 

Dirk

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Nov 12, 2017
4,767
Central California
Just to clarify some terminology, as Allen and I are both using the term "diverter." Instead of "diverter," I should have used "three-way valve." That's the type I was suggesting.

Three-way valves have three ports, two-way valves have two ports, both are considered "diverter" valves. Here's a good article about 'em:


Your latest illustration is showing four two-way valves for output (or return), and three two-way valves for input (or suction). A two-way valve can be used to completely shut down flow. A three-way valve is used to select "input" from one of two sources, or a mix of both sources, but does not completely shut off flow to the pump. A three-way valve can also be used on the output (return) side, to send water to one of two destinations, or to balance some amount to both, but cannot completely block flow from the pump.

Allen's suggestions can certainly minimize the likelihood of starving or blocking the pump. You can decide if that's safe enough for your application. Three-way valves would eliminate the likelihood, but, admittedly, be slightly less intuitive about which valve is doing what. Locking down or removing handles also has some associated inconvenience ("Where'd I put that handle!?!). Just pointing out the options for ya...
 

Dirk

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Nov 12, 2017
4,767
Central California
Look at this plumbing pic and the way 3 way valves were used as a T fitting and a valve.

First post and about to sign a contract after 4 estimates.
That image also illustrates a point made earlier. Note how it only requires one three-way to control two lines, and two three-ways to control three lines...

OK, I've done enough damage! I'll bow out now. The other cooks in this kitchen know way more about this stuff than I do! :salut:
 
Last edited:

ImLon2

Active member
Make all your manifolds out of 2" and drop into 1.5 for the returns at the manifold easily by going 2" to outside of valve and 1.5" to inside no bushings needed they are made that way.
I like this idea.

Also try to not make a trident as the supply side you show. Water from middle feed will take most flow and be less on outside Ls unless you plan on it that way. I always come in one end and go down the line with Ts.
I wasn't sure if that would be the case or not, but i figured on the supply side I would have the Middle as the bottom drain, and can always back down with the diverter, if I'm not getting the desired suction from the main drains. On the output line that was going to be the return that is split at the steps into 2 eyeballs and I would actually back that flow down. Will that work in this situation?

Look at this plumbing pic and the way 3 way valves were used as a T fitting and a valve.

First post and about to sign a contract after 4 estimates.
I think I'm confused. I feel like this how I updated mine. The 2-way on the 2 lines (on, off, control flow) and the 3-way on the 3 lines (divierting from one direction to another, to bypass heater) Is that not the case?
 

ajw22

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jul 21, 2013
18,162
Northern NJ
I went to Lowe’s this afternoon, and picked up a bunch of both 1-1/2” and 2”, pipe, 90° sweeps, tee’s, and couplings.

Then I started thinking is there “special” fittings for pool use?
I hope you got Schedule 40 PVC and not PVC pipe and fittings marked DWV (Drain, Waste, Vent). DWV is for non-pressurized plumbing and should not be used for a pool. DWV PVC has thinner walls then Schedule 40 PVC.

Schedule 40 PVC parts have deeper hubs (ends) then DWV PVC parts. The shallower ends on DWV parts is the way to identify their incorrect use in pool plumbing.

Pool PVC should be marked "Schedule 40". Schedule 40 PVC is made for water under pressure.

If the pipe has ASTM D 1785 on the pipe, it's suitable for pressure applications. A rating of ASTM D 2665 means non pressure applications and should not be used for pools.

A pipe can be dual rated ASTM D 1785 and ASTM D 2665, but it has to say ASTM D 1785 if it's going to be used for pressure.

You can find PVC fittings at Buy Schedule 40 PVC Fittings at Discount Prices