Low Voltage to Ignitor

Martin Torres

New member
Jun 7, 2020
3
Woodland CA
Hi All. Thanks for the add. Question about a Hayward H400IDL2 propane pool heater ignitor issue. Heater won't ignite. All sensors are operating correctly, gas valve opens (new valve is putting out correct pressure, checked and adjusted with manometer) and ignitor heats. Pulled ignitor and turned on heater. New ignitor glows red but only in the middle. Ohms out good per specs. Checked voltage at ignitor board. 120VAC coming in but only 105 VAC going to ignitor. Swapped ignitor board and same voltage, 105 VAC. If I use a propane torch and fire it off after the gas valve opens, heater fires and runs. Once it reaches temp and shuts off, won't refire.

Is the ignitor supposed to get 120VAC? If so, what would cause low voltage with 2 different boards when they get 120 coming in?
 

JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
21,129
The heater is equipped with a Hot Surface Ignition Control System that automatically lights the burners. An external power supply is required to power the control system.
The heater comes factory-wired for use with a 240 VAC, 60 Hz, field power supply. To convert the heater to 120 VAC, 60 Hz, remove the 240 VAC Voltage Selector Plug from the receptacle on the Fuse Board. Locate the 120 VAC Voltage Selector Plug and install it into the receptacle.

ADAPTIVE LEARNING ROUTINE
The control uses an adaptive learning routine that optimizes ignition performance and igniter life by regulating the igniter temperature. Excessive temperature at the igniter can cause it to fail prematurely. The control measures supply voltage to determine an initial igniter temperature. After each successful ignition the control reduces igniter temperature slightly until a failed ignition occurs. Once this occurs, the control increases igniter temperature and then maintains this temperature for a series of ignitions. This learning routine is repeated periodically.
The control continuously monitors supply voltage and compensates for any changes to igniter temperature.

The transformer converts the field supply voltage (120 VAC / 240 VAC) to a 120 VAC output for powering the blower and ignitor circuits, and to a 24 VAC output for powering the control module, control circuits, and gas valve.
Do you have the correct voltage selector plug installed?

Is your multimeter a True RMS multimeter?

The control board apparently adjusts the voltage going to the igniter. Maybe that's the problem?

Check the voltage and current going to the igniter while the igniter is getting hot.

Use a True RMS multimeter.
 

swamprat69

Well-known member
Mar 30, 2019
336
Las Vegas, NV
The whole ignitor should heat up, not just the middle. Try looking at this Hayward H-Series Low Nox - IDL Parts - INYOPools.com Scroll down to ignitors on the parts page. It will show three ignitors. Is your heater wired for 120 Vac supply? The first 2 ignitors are silicon carbide, one for 240 Vac supply and one for 120 Vac supply and the third is a silicon nitride ignitor. Which picture matches your ignitor? What was your Ohm reading for the ignitor when you took it? I have a Hayward H400IDL2BH (2004-2006) wired for 240 Vac supply at the circuit board where the power supply comes in using the 240V jumper on that board and the silicon nitride ignitor.
 

JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
21,129
Disconnect plug from P4 connector from Fuse Board. Measure for 24VAC between
pins 1 & 2 of plug of Transformer and for 120VAC between pins 4 & 6. If 24VAC or
120VAC is not present, replace Transformer. Otherwise, proceed to step 7.

Go through the troubleshooting tests in the manual.
 

Martin Torres

New member
Jun 7, 2020
3
Woodland CA
Matched part number for part number when I bought the new ignitor. Ohm reading was 16.06. Have 24 vac and 120 vac.

James switched the jumper to 120 like you posted. Blew all three fuses on the board. Hopefully didn't fry anything else. Will find out when I locate those fuses. Online is three weeks out. No power to control panel or ignitor board. Thanks James....
 

JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
21,129
Did you verify the incoming voltage before you changed the plug?

My post asked if you were using the correct plug.

I did not say to switch to the 120 volt plug.

If you use the 120 volt plug with 240 volt supply, you will damage the heater.

If you don't feel confident working on this type of equipment, you should contact a professional to help you.
 
Last edited:

JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
21,129
Do you have the correct voltage selector plug installed?
Here are the 3 possible answers:

1) Yes, the correct plug is installed.
2) No, the correct plug is not installed.
3) I don't know how to check that.

At no point did I say to switch the plug.

Do you know what the supply voltage is?

Did you measure it?

Note that the first part of my first post in the quotes is copied from the installation manual for reference.
 
Last edited:

Martin Torres

New member
Jun 7, 2020
3
Woodland CA
Here are the 3 possible answers:

1) Yes, the correct plug is installed.
2) No, the correct plug is not installed.
3) I don't know how to check that.

At no point did I say to switch the plug.

Do you know what the supply voltage is?

Did you measure it?

Note that the first part of my first post in the quotes is copied from the installation manual for reference.
Please go help someone else.....