how many ounces of soda ash in a cup?

kolam

New member
Jan 1, 2015
3
0
Dallas TX
#1
Hi, I don't have a scale and am trying to figure out how many ounces of (Leslie's) soda ash go in a regular measuring cup. I've been searching the web and TFP to no avail so far, so I've created an account to ask this question.

Thanks!

P.S. I was going to ask the same about (Arm and Hammer) baking soda, but I found at gourmetsleuth.com that 4.6 grams = 1 tsp, so assuming that's correct...
4.6 g/tsp * 48 tsp/C = 220.8 g/C
220.8 g/C / 28.35 g/oz =
7.79 oz/C for baking soda

Sanity check: 1.5 C removed a fraction around a sixth of a 5-lb bucket, which is about 8.93 oz/C. Kind of close.
 

chem geek

LifeTime Supporter
TFP Expert
Mar 28, 2007
12,082
2
San Rafael, CA USA
#3
1 cup of soda ash is around 9.2 ounces weight. 1 cup of baking soda is around 10.0 ounces weight (1 teaspoon is 5.9 grams). But as was noted, PoolMath will tell you both weight and volume for the amounts needed.
 

kolam

New member
Jan 1, 2015
3
0
Dallas TX
#4
Thanks for the tip, but that site doesn't give any units of measure. It seems very similar to the site I was using, http://poolcalculator.com/, which does give units, so they're probably both using the same mysterious ounces.

The problem for me, though, is that "weight" isn't very helpful, and I'm not sure what "ounces by volume" means. Is it equivalent to the volume of fluid ounces even if it's a powdered chemical? If so, then that's easy (8 fl. oz. = 1 cup)

Thanks, chemgeek, for answering those specific questions!
 

JVTrain

TFP Expert
Feb 3, 2014
5,080
0
Central Minnesota
#5
I for one hate that there are ounces and fluid ounces... go go metric system!

Pool Math is the updated and supported version for calculating chemical additions, pool calculator may not be updated. Pool Math shows both the ounces BY WEIGHT and the ounces BY VOLUME which would be "fluid" ounces such as in a measuring cup. To see this, just enter your Now TA and a Target TA to display the weights and volumes you should add.
 

chem geek

LifeTime Supporter
TFP Expert
Mar 28, 2007
12,082
2
San Rafael, CA USA
#6
The problem for me, though, is that "weight" isn't very helpful, and I'm not sure what "ounces by volume" means. Is it equivalent to the volume of fluid ounces even if it's a powdered chemical? If so, then that's easy (8 fl. oz. = 1 cup)
Ounces by volume is indeed fluid ounces. 8 fluid ounces in 1 cup. 3 teaspoons in a tablespoon and 2 tablespoon (so 6 teaspoons) in a fluid ounce.
 

chem geek

LifeTime Supporter
TFP Expert
Mar 28, 2007
12,082
2
San Rafael, CA USA
#10
The original question was regarding the weight and volume relationship for soda ash and for baking soda. This relationship is not just the units of measurement but the density (specific gravity) of the materials. While in Europe people tend to measure everything by weight which is the more accurate way to do things, in the U.S. and some other places people measure by volume which isn't as accurate because bulk density can vary. Nevertheless, we've taken such common bulk densities and put them into PoolMath so that one can get volume measurements for dosing in addition to weight measurements.