help with Dry acid On fresh fill pool please

Cmak

Active member
Jul 19, 2020
28
Southern California
Your test kit does not test for CYA. That is why I directed you to follow the Seasonal pool instructions. What you put in you assume is in the pool as far as CYA goes. If your pool turns cloudy or any algae, you dump the water, clean the pool, and start over.
Ahh I see , thanks for that I will definitely upgrade our kit soon but for now I’ll just be testing what our kit allows . I’m about to test it soon so I’ll post the results .
Thanks a bunch , soo helpful !
 

Dirk

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Nov 12, 2017
7,132
Central California
Your signature didn't update. Still reads only "cmak." Seasonal pools are significantly easier to maintain, in terms of accumulation of various elements. Something we "full timers" have to watch constantly. Enjoy your pool!
 

Cmak

Active member
Jul 19, 2020
28
Southern California
Testing color question with half results
Ok , I have just taken cover off , time is currently 2 pm the pump has been running for 4hrs as of now . So far I have just tested my chlorine and ph. I am wanting to know the optimal surface and light to see the drop colors as accurately as possible . Not sure this matters , but inside The colors brighter and outside The colors are more opaque . Here are some photos of what I’m looking at .
My opinions are :
ph color seems to be at 7.6
Chlorine - 2.0 -3.0
I’ll be back with the full results of acid and alkalinity .
 

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Cmak

Active member
Jul 19, 2020
28
Southern California
I use a white background. Preferably natural light.

Your numbers sound good. Add 3 ppm FC worth of liquid chlorine.
Thanks for the guidance :)

I accidentally Dumped my ph water sample and the booklet of instructions said I need to keep the ph sample water to do the acid demand test . I went and retested the Ph once again and it actually looks to be at 7.2 With that said the booklet tells me if the ph is higher than 7.8 I should then perform the acid demand test using the same water sample .

Q1. If my ph is at 7.2 would I dump the ph sample I have and use new sample of pool water for acid demand test ?

Q2. What does ppm stand for ?

Q3. I just added the liquid cya yesterday around 2pm . When I finish my pool test and everything reads correctly would it be ok to swim Now ? If so then would I add the 3 ppm of FC to pool now or after swim ?

Q4. Let’s say after swim do you test pool and then add what the pool needs according to test ?

Sorry for all the q’s I really am learning step by step . Appreciate the help .
 

mknauss

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
Bronze Supporter
May 3, 2014
33,291
Laughlin, NV
pH in the 7’s is fine. Use Poolmath instead of the acid demand test

Parts per million

Swim now. Add the chlorine now. No issue.

No need to retest after swim. Test and add tomorrow.
 

Cmak

Active member
Jul 19, 2020
28
Southern California
pH in the 7’s is fine. Use Poolmath instead of the acid demand test

Parts per million

Swim now. Add the chlorine now. No issue.

No need to retest after swim. Test and add tomorrow.
I just went and re read the pool school , so helpful and so are you . Soo grateful , thanks so much my kids will be thrilled to hear !!!
 
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Dirk

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Nov 12, 2017
7,132
Central California
Just FYI... your 5-way is fine for what you're doing (and doing well!), so not another pitch for the "advanced" test kits (well, maybe an indirect one). One of the reasons we like and recommend the kits we do is because they include the FAS-DPD test for FC, the one we all do the most. It doesn't compare colors. You mix in a little scoop of powder, the sample turns pink, then you drop-drop-drop with a reagent, counting the drops, until the water turns clear. The number of drops gives you your FC. It's accurate and much easier to translate, IMO, and is less "light source" dependent. For pH, I bounced the subject around in this thread, if you're interested. We were discussing drop tests vs digital probes for the pH test (don't worry, you don't need a digital probe!), but we also got into testing procedures that might be of help to you, starting at post # 9:
 

CrystalRiver

Well-known member
Jun 19, 2020
297
Massachusetts
You had asked about adding chemicals together and when you can swim after adding.

Always run the pump for 30 minutes before collecting your water sample for testing. Then you can add whatever combination of chems it needs EXCEPT chlorine and acid within 30 minutes of each other. Run pump 30 minutes after chems are added, and you can swim at that point.
 

Cmak

Active member
Jul 19, 2020
28
Southern California
pH in the 7’s is fine. Use Poolmath instead of the acid demand test

Parts per million

Swim now. Add the chlorine now. No issue.

No need to retest after swim. Test and add tomorrow.
You had asked about adding chemicals together and when you can swim after adding.

Always run the pump for 30 minutes before collecting your water sample for testing. Then you can add whatever combination of chems it needs EXCEPT chlorine and acid within 30 minutes of each other. Run pump 30 minutes after chems are added, and you can swim at that point.
Oh great to know , so glad I have that piece of mind now as far as when to run things and chemicals .
I definitely want To get the better drop test when I’m able to .
Also just so I know because I’m terrible with math and chemistry. When you say 3ppm (parts per million ) I Actually used a calculator I found on the web Haha but does 12 oz of chlorine sound right ? I assume you take the gallons of the pool , and then the chlorine strength and divide & multiply some Things and get the oz I should add .
Q. Is this the daily amount to add ?
Q. Does 12 oz sound right ?
Thanks
 

mknauss

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
Bronze Supporter
May 3, 2014
33,291
Laughlin, NV
Use your Poolmath. You can use Effects of Adding Chemicals. 12 oz of 10% bleach will add 3.3 ppm FC to your pool.

How much you add depends on what the pool needs. For now I have kept it simple. Once you learn your testing process you will want to add enough to keep the yellow test in the dark yellow range.
 

Cmak

Active member
Jul 19, 2020
28
Southern California
Use your Poolmath. You can use Effects of Adding Chemicals. 12 oz of 10% bleach will add 3.3 ppm FC to your pool.

How much you add depends on what the pool needs. For now I have kept it simple. Once you learn your testing process you will want to add enough to keep the yellow test in the dark yellow range.
Oh I didn’t even touch that feature , great I’ll look into that , I did upgrade my pool math just now to get some extra features so I think that will help .
Q. Let’s say my chlorine level says 3 Now and I use Effects of Adding Chemicals.
Ex. 12 oz of 10% bleach will add 3.3 ppm FC to your pool. Will that Be in addition to the 3 I currently have in pool Totaling 6.3 ? Just want to make sure I’m understanding the effects of adding chemicals feature . Thanks again for answering all of my questions .🤓
 

mknauss

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
Bronze Supporter
May 3, 2014
33,291
Laughlin, NV
Yes. If you have 3 now, and add 3.3, you will have 6.3 ppm FC in the pool.

You are adding each day what the pool uses. UV (from the sun) and swimmers consume chlorine. 3 ppm is a rough average. Right now, it will not raise your FC too high and will not allow it to get too low. But you will be able to add less as the summer ends and you learn to read the test results better.
 

Dirk

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Nov 12, 2017
7,132
Central California
C, if using Pool Math that way works for you, that's fine. But that's not the way I do, and I don't think that's the actual purpose of that tool. You're working too hard!

My MO in the Pool Math app:

I hit the + button, then the "Log Test Results" option. That gives me a new Test Results page. I perform the tests I'm going to, and fill in the results in the corresponding fields. If I don't do every test, Pool Math remembers the last time I did, and uses those old numbers for the next step. I then click the checkmark button up above towards the right, and that enters my test results into my log, and into Pool Math's built-in calculator.

Then I click the Overview button (next to the + button at the bottom) and that gives me a tidy screen that shows all my levels. Those I just tested, along with any I didn't (filled in with the results of the most recent tests I did for those chemicals). Each little square shows the most recent test result along with the TFP-recommended range. I can spot right away any levels that are off. If one of my levels is out of range (or not exactly where I want it), I click that little square.

The resulting screen is pretty self explanatory. Let's say I'm looking at FC. I can alter the recommended target to whatever number I want (maybe I want a little extra chlorine that day) or just leave it with the TFP-recommended target. I input the type and strength of the chlorine I'm going to add (it remembers what I last used, so unless I change my chlorine, I don't have to fill that in every time). Voila! At the bottom of that same screen the app tells me exactly what to add. No calculating necessary! No other screens or tools necessary! If I decide to accept that instruction, I go do the dosing, and then come back to that same screen and hit the "Log addition" button. The app records what I added (or if I decided to add even a bit more chlorine, I can plug that in, too).

Then I go back to the Overview screen and repeat that exact process for any other chemicals out of range. Usually its just FC, and pH. That's it. It's soooo easy, that once you do that for a time or two, you'll be like.... "Wha!? That's all there is to pool chemistry?!?!" Yup! You could have flunked chemistry class!! If you can type numbers into a smart phone, you can take care of a pool!

After that "Ah ha!" moment, if you're like me, you'll continue to ask questions and reread Pool School and then tweak the chemicals in your pool just so. But that's not required (especially with a seasonal pool). You can just trust the app and be done and go swimming!

Or rather "Go swimmin' like bow-legged wimmen" as my g-daughter likes to yell on her way into the water! My perfectly safe, balanced TFP water! TFP tested, g-daughter approved! ;)