Heater Troubleshooting Help

JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
16,117
Two different labels with different model numbers and different serial numbers.

The floor of one of the heaters is rusted out.

The heaters are probably much older than the seller is claiming.

Based on the serial numbers, it looks like one heater is from 2012 and the other is from 1999.


I suspect that the seller probably has a junkyard full of old equipment that they sell "As Is" to whoever is gullible. Then, they refuse to deal with the buyer when the junk equipment doesn't work.
 
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IL_WS

Well-known member
Sep 18, 2012
122
IL, NW of Chicago
I would suggest a Digital Low Nox heater.

Have your gas person check the supply and advise you about the size of the heater the line will support.
I talked to my "gas guy" (an acquaintance from church). It turns out he is a plumber who did my gas line. For a plain vanilla install, I'm sure not an issue. He said going to 2psi for the line is outside his wheelhouse. [On a side note, he is on year 15 on a comparable heater (Jandy 175k BTU) to mine having done nothing more than I have (drain in winter)]

I have a number for my neighbor's pool guy. He has done much of their work, including replacing their heater this year. I will find out his credentials when I call.

However, what do I lose going with a smaller heater? Just time to set point? Doing 150k BTU heater (P-R156A for $1187) will heat at 1.1 degree/hour where 200k BTU heater (P-R206A for $1549 or P-R207A for $1595) will heat at 1.5 degree/hour. 200k BTU will require bigger meter, and be right at edge of line at current psi.

Additionally, I'm a little gun shy on price since my current heater failed in year 7. I can get 156A for $400 less than 207A. If it's mainly down to time to temperature, I can live with that for now. Not being in CA means I don't need to go to the low NOx at this time.

I haven't even looked into price of 266k BTU heaters yet. I know it will be extra cost for heater, meter upgrade, line modification.
 

Pool Clown

In The Industry
Sep 5, 2008
1,974
Silicon Valley, CA
On a side note, he is on year 15 on a comparable heater (Jandy 175k BTU) to mine having done nothing more than I have (drain in winter)

However, what do I lose going with a smaller heater? Just time to set point? Doing 150k BTU heater (P-R156A for $1187) will heat at 1.1 degree/hour where 200k BTU heater (P-R206A for $1549 or P-R207A for $1595) will heat at 1.5 degree/hour. 200k BTU will require bigger meter, and be right at edge of line at current psi.

Additionally, I'm a little gun shy on price since my current heater failed in year 7. I can get 156A for $400 less than 207A. If it's mainly down to time to temperature, I can live with that for now. Not being in CA means I don't need to go to the low NOx at this time.
The fact that your heater didn't last as long as your neighbors could be something as seemingly insignificant as location. Like i suggested earlier, perhaps your heater is in a location that shades the snow, and provides a wet location longer than the neighbor. Or your heaters' location gets a bit more snow build up. Maybe his heater is just a tick more protected... Or unprotected, and the wind allows his to dry out sooner.

A thought on smaller...

Keep in mind that, your "heat rise per hour" is a formula. Meaning Your mileage may vary...possibly substantially, especially if the heater is undersized for the pool. Also, heat rise is when the heater is running (of course), but more importantly, heat loss occurs when the heater is off. So when it comes back on in the morning, you're not picking up where you left off yesterday, but may have to recover several degrees (overnite loss), then pick up where you left off. IOW, you may find that, until the pool is up to temp, the heater may need run uninterrupted. BTW, that is the manufacturers suggested procedure for the initial heat up in the spring. And then, you may also find that, depending on the weather (heat loss) you will need to run the heater longer each day, which means running the pump longer (more electricity). As we get into fall, that is guaranteed.

What am i getting at???

Spending more for a heater (and perhaps a gas upgrade) now may save you in both gas and electrical costs down the road.
 
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JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
16,117
Good point about the heat loss.

The heat gain rate information is only the gain. The pool also loses heat as it's heating. So, you won't get the gain rate expected.

If you're going to keep the pool heated, it's not a big deal. If you're going to heat on demand during cooler weather, it's going to be a significant issue.