Grilling Steaks --some myths dispelled

JohnT

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Apr 4, 2007
9,614
SW Indiana
We raise cattle, and a recent industry magazine had the results of pretty thorough study on tenderness and grilling methods. Some points I thought were interesting.


#1 Searing a steak at high heat initially had no effect on tenderness, flavor or general "mouth appeal", but it did result in getting the steak done more quickly.

#2 Maximum tenderness was achieved by turning the steak every 2 or 3 minutes until done. (Seems to be because juices are redistributed upon flipping)

#3 Applying salt before, during or after cooking made no difference in quality.

#4 Letting the steak stand for 5 to 10 minutes after removing it from the grill is important to allow juices to redistribute within the meat.

#5 Drinking a cold Bass Ale while grilling puts the chef in a much better frame of mind.

These go against things I've been told, but this was a study that involved over 15,000 steaks being cooked,and both human evaluators and mechanical tenderness measurements. Actually # 5 is my own addition, but I assure you it has been thoroughly researched. :wink:
 

uwimage

LifeTime Supporter
Apr 10, 2007
287
Richardson, TX
I agree with everything above, one thing I've found that really makes a difference with thicker cut steaks is to let them stand to room temp for about 30 min...so it's an even cook and your not searing the outside and the inside stays cold.

Let me know if you ever need someone to test your steaks :)
 

JohnT

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Apr 4, 2007
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SW Indiana
uwimage said:
I agree with everything above, one thing I've found that really makes a difference with thicker cut steaks is to let them stand to room temp for about 30 min...so it's an even cook and your not searing the outside and the inside stays cold.

Let me know if you ever need someone to test your steaks :)
One other finding was that putting partially frozen steaks on the grill is a bad thing. Probably for the same reason.

I never have any trouble finding steak testers. :) I have a 14 1/2 year old son who can eat until the food runs out. :shock: Good thing we raise our own.
 

waterbug

LifeTime Supporter
Mar 28, 2007
182
Richmond, Va
Interesting tips, I do use most of them with the exception of #5. I find the cooker to be placed in a more conducive frame of mind with the liberal application of dry white wine. :lol:
 

JohnT

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Apr 4, 2007
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SW Indiana
waterbug said:
Interesting tips, I do use most of them with the exception of #5. I find the cooker to be placed in a more conducive frame of mind with the liberal application of dry white wine. :lol:

It's just like pool chemicals. If you look closely, you'll find wine and beer have the same active ingredient.
 

JohnT

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Apr 4, 2007
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SeanB said:
Good info. One thing about turning the meat is to not do it with a fork. You don't want to puncture the meat while cooking, it lets our the juices.

What kind of cattle do you raise John?
Polled Herefords.
 

mkamp1515

Member
Mar 28, 2007
8
Crowley, TX
How do those babies look? Seared at approx. 800 degrees for 90-120 seconds on each side. Then taken off and the grill cooled to about 450 degrees. Put back on and turned frequently till reaches desired doneness. Let set for about 5-10 minutes and then time to CHOW!!




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kirbinster

Well-known member
Apr 30, 2007
293
NJ
I have found the best way to cook steak (or chicken) is to use a TEC infrared grill. This thing looks like a normal stainless grill on the outside, but it has two burners. Each one has 15,000 holes in it and rather than have a flame it just glows cherry red. You turn it up to high (which is about 15 billion degrees ;) ) and cook the meat for about 2 minutes on each side, then turn it down to medium and finish it. The steak is charred on the outside and nice and rare on the inside. Yummy! (only downside is a small one of these grills goes for around $1,500.
 

SeanB

TFP Expert
Platinum Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
kirbinster said:
I have found the best way to cook steak (or chicken) is to use a TEC infrared grill. This thing looks like a normal stainless grill on the outside, but it has two burners. Each one has 15,000 holes in it and rather than have a flame it just glows cherry red. You turn it up to high (which is about 15 billion degrees ;) ) and cook the meat for about 2 minutes on each side, then turn it down to medium and finish it. The steak is charred on the outside and nice and rare on the inside. Yummy! (only downside is a small one of these grills goes for around $1,500.
That sounds really cool, but where do you put the wood? :mrgreen: ;)
 

DONNIE

LifeTime Supporter
Mar 28, 2007
124
OKLAHOMA
Weber/Ducane has a new one with that feature and a rear infrared rotessire for $699.00 at Home Depo. Very nice looking grill. I just bought a new Kenmore stainless steel 5 burner with infrared rotessire and 12KBTU side burner that I just love. Keeping it clean may be a whole other story but it sure is pretty!

Donnie
 

cliff_s

Well-known member
Mar 28, 2007
93
For TEC grills you might check out Lowes, they have a couple
of models and they are TEC's with the infrared burners.

For steaks, NEVER freeze the meat. It disturbs the water balance
in the meat(the water freezes the meat itself doesn't). Choose
the steak with the fat that is evenly distributed throughout
the meat. Avoid the ones with large chunks of fat. Be sure
the meat is at room temperature. The most important part don't
over cook it. Enjoy.

Cliff s
 

tnthudson

LifeTime Supporter
Mar 31, 2008
328
Central VA
I like my Big Green Egg and VC 5-burner grill, but my boss (who has grills/smokers out the yazoo and gave me these 2 grills) is ga-ga over "The Big Easy" by Char-Broil. It advertises as a "oil-less turkey fryer," and it does make a mean turkey, but he cooks bone-in rib eye roasts, ribs, buffalo and all kinds of stuff in it. It may be because it's a new 'toy' for him, but I think he's using it almost exclusively now. When we were at the Hearth, Patio & Barbecue trade show this year, the thing got runner-up on an industry award, and it's a cheap item...it will be interesting to see if it lasts the test of time or if it fades out the way of the hot air ovens and other fads.
But I gotta say, the meat is so tender & moist, it does make a mean hunk of meat.
 

TomU

LifeTime Supporter
Apr 22, 2007
93
Wyoming, Michigan
JohnT said:
We raise cattle, and a recent industry magazine had the results of pretty thorough study on tenderness and grilling methods.
John,

Can you give me the magazine name? I'd like to read the article, and pass it on to some friends as well. Thanks!

Tom
 

JohnT

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Mod Squad
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Apr 4, 2007
9,614
SW Indiana
TomU said:
JohnT said:
We raise cattle, and a recent industry magazine had the results of pretty thorough study on tenderness and grilling methods.
John,

Can you give me the magazine name? I'd like to read the article, and pass it on to some friends as well. Thanks!

Tom
It was in "Hereford World", which most people probably don't have a copy of, but I saw it quoted someplace else. I'll see of I can find it.

Here's a link: Steak Cooking
 

tnthudson

LifeTime Supporter
Mar 31, 2008
328
Central VA
Unbelievable article, I had to print it out. I always thought that you took the steak out, let it get to room temp., seared it on each side, then turned once during grilling. And yes, let it sit when it's done.
It's going to be hard for me to reverse over 20 years of grilling a certain way, but hey, I'll give it a shot. :)
Thanks for the link!
 

snapped

Active member
Apr 20, 2008
27
JohnT said:
We raise cattle, and a recent industry magazine had the results of pretty thorough study on tenderness and grilling methods. Some points I thought were interesting.


#1 Searing a steak at high heat initially had no effect on tenderness, flavor or general "mouth appeal", but it did result in getting the steak done more quickly.

#2 Maximum tenderness was achieved by turning the steak every 2 or 3 minutes until done. (Seems to be because juices are redistributed upon flipping)

#3 Applying salt before, during or after cooking made no difference in quality.

#4 Letting the steak stand for 5 to 10 minutes after removing it from the grill is important to allow juices to redistribute within the meat.

#5 Drinking a cold Bass Ale while grilling puts the chef in a much better frame of mind.

These go against things I've been told, but this was a study that involved over 15,000 steaks being cooked,and both human evaluators and mechanical tenderness measurements. Actually # 5 is my own addition, but I assure you it has been thoroughly researched. :wink:

Well I tried # 2 & 4 tonight and the steaks come out very tender and juicy. I substituted crown and coke for a bass ale and didnt seem to suffer any consequences :p
 

Starsky

LifeTime Supporter
May 16, 2008
68
I am horrible at cooking but my older brother is quite the home chef. His love of cooking doesn't rub off on me, but I do get the benifit of eating his food once in awhile. I just recently learned how to cook ribeye "the right way" indoors. After 5 trys, every attempt has been perfect so its idiot proof and probably something you guys already know. I didn't know how important room temp was before cooking my steaks, but 30 yrs of cold red center should have been a clue. so anyway..on those days when its too cold to go outside..

I start with a nice prime grade ribeye steak cut 1 1/2 in and room temp

Pre heat the oven to 500

lightly coat a cast iron...my brother says its gotta be cast iron skillet.. ;) and heat on high on the stove till it smokes..

season the meat to taste and sear in for 30 seconds each side

Place skillet with steak in the oven for 2 min, flip and leave for 2 minutes then remove

Let cool for 5 minutes with a tent foil over it..dont ask me why... and eat..

Should be Medium rare...