Do I really Care about CYA; persistent algae

Propertyopp

Member
Jun 5, 2017
22
Bluemont,va
This year I am trying to maintain the pool myself rather than have the pool service do so. After reading many posts on the Forum I am not sure they understand the chemistry adequately. Of course I don't either. Here are the issues:
I have a SPRING fed,
in-ground,
about 25,000+ gal natural form pool
with Pond Rubber lining
waterfall recirculating pump and
DE filter system.
Lightly used pool
Right now my water is clear, but algae continues to cling to the sides of the pool and settle on the stone entry steps everyday. (It's hot) My Chlorine is high and my PH is high. I use a combination of Cal-hypo shock and liquid chlorine
I dont care about scaling.
**Questions:
1. I dont use CYA, maybe I should?
2. What tests besides the 5 drop for chlorine and PH do I need? (I also have (old) calcium strips)
 

Texas Splash

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Yes, you definitely need to have some CYA. Without it, your FC is getting consumed by the sun's UV within a matter of minutes. Start with a CYA of at least 30 ppm, maybe even 40 since we're still in the summer months. Then keep the FC and CYA balanced as noted on the FC/CYA Chart, maybe even on the slightly higher end of that scale since you have spring-fed water.

For best water testing you really need a TF-100 (link in my signature) or Taylor K-2006C. If you are hesitant about either kit right now, at the very minimum get the FAS-DPD portion which normally comes with each kit. This way you can accurately test FC at just about any level needed. I would however stick to liquid chlorine as much as possible, even though CH is not an issue.

Understand that in our conventional pools when we get algae, we follow the SLAM Process. If you are able to do that based on your set-up, that would be ideal.
 

Jeff J.

Well-known member
Aug 6, 2019
223
Staten Island NY
This year I am trying to maintain the pool myself rather than have the pool service do so. After reading many posts on the Forum I am not sure they understand the chemistry adequately. Of course I don't either. Here are the issues:
I have a SPRING fed,
in-ground,
about 25,000+ gal natural form pool
with Pond Rubber lining
waterfall recirculating pump and
DE filter system.
Lightly used pool
Right now my water is clear, but algae continues to cling to the sides of the pool and settle on the stone entry steps everyday. (It's hot) My Chlorine is high and my PH is high. I use a combination of Cal-hypo shock and liquid chlorine
I dont care about scaling.
**Questions:
1. I dont use CYA, maybe I should?
2. What tests besides the 5 drop for chlorine and PH do I need? (I also have (old) calcium strips)
If you haven't already, read Pool School.
 

Propertyopp

Member
Jun 5, 2017
22
Bluemont,va
Yes, you definitely need to have some CYA. Without it, your FC is getting consumed by the sun's UV within a matter of minutes. Start with a CYA of at least 30 ppm, maybe even 40 since we're still in the summer months. Then keep the FC and CYA balanced as noted on the FC/CYA Chart, maybe even on the slightly higher end of that scale since you have spring-fed water.

For best water testing you really need a TF-100 (link in my signature) or Taylor K-2006C. If you are hesitant about either kit right now, at the very minimum get the FAS-DPD portion which normally comes with each kit. This way you can accurately test FC at just about any level needed. I would however stick to liquid chlorine as much as possible, even though CH is not an issue.

Understand that in our conventional pools when we get algae, we follow the SLAM Process. If you are able to do that based on your set-up, that would be ideal.
Thank you for your reply. Right now I'm testing to see how long my chlorine holds. I added 2 gal last night and it's fine today the pH is high but water is really fine.
I find the cya the most confusing thing ever. Apparently there is some new thinking about it. Have you seen this article oh, any comments?
Yes, you definitely need to have some CYA. Without it, your FC is getting consumed by the sun's UV within a matter of minutes. Start with a CYA of at least 30 ppm, maybe even 40 since we're still in the summer months. Then keep the FC and CYA balanced as noted on the FC/CYA Chart, maybe even on the slightly higher end of that scale since you have spring-fed water.

For best water testing you really need a TF-100 (link in my signature) or Taylor K-2006C. If you are hesitant about either kit right now, at the very minimum get the FAS-DPD portion which normally comes with each kit. This way you can accurately test FC at just about any level needed. I would however stick to liquid chlorine as much as possible, even though CH is not an issue.

Understand that in our conventional pools when we get algae, we follow the SLAM Process. If you are able to do that based on your set-up, that would be ideal.
Thank you for your reply. right now I'm trying to monitor my chlorine. I added two gallons last night and it's fine today although the pH is high. The water is fine and clear. The cya issue is extremely confusing to me. Have you seen this, any comments? New Thinking: Chlorine/Cyanuric Acid in Balance
 

Dirk

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Nov 12, 2017
7,181
Central California
1000s and 1000s of TFP members have been using (and so, testing) the FC/CYA relationship principles, using our FC/CYA Chart for many years now. It's a thing. It works. Our pools are proof.
 
Last edited:

JJ_Tex

Bronze Supporter
Jul 17, 2019
1,724
Prosper, TX (DFW)
The people in that article are our leaders. Newdude even got them to sign a bottle of bleach.

Seriously, CYA is not a new thing and it is good for your pool in moderation. Most in the industry, including pool stores, have fixed ranges for FC and CYA and do not see a relationship between the two. Here we recognize that they are a ratio and not a fixed number, hence the FC/CYA chart (see my signature).

Do you have specific questions, and what is the aversion to CYA?
 

duraleigh

Admin
Mod Squad
TFP Expert
Platinum Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
In The Industry
Apr 1, 2007
34,430
Sebring, Florida
Sounds like you do not have a circulatory system. Is that the case?

If so, you will never get rid of algae
 

Propertyopp

Member
Jun 5, 2017
22
Bluemont,va
Yes, you definitely need to have some CYA. Without it, your FC is getting consumed by the sun's UV within a matter of minutes. Start with a CYA of at least 30 ppm, maybe even 40 since we're still in the summer months. Then keep the FC and CYA balanced as noted on the FC/CYA Chart, maybe even on the slightly higher end of that scale since you have spring-fed water.

For best water testing you really need a TF-100 (link in my signature) or Taylor K-2006C. If you are hesitant about either kit right now, at the very minimum get the FAS-DPD portion which normally comes with each kit. This way you can accurately test FC at just about any level needed. I would however stick to liquid chlorine as much as possible, even though CH is not an issue.

Understand that in our conventional pools when we get algae, we follow the SLAM Process. If you are able to do that based on your set-up, that would be ideal.
Yes, I can SLAM if necessary. Re CYA testing, I found Taylor has put out testing strips that include CYA. This is a new product according to its ad. I have never used CYA although my pool service in the past probably has. I have been able to manage without it. This week coming will be the first time I am trying to use it myself. I will monitor how it functions. I will use these test strips. I am basically lazy admittedly. But they sound like a great idea to me if they work. Unfortunately I have to rely on my pool helper for the next 10 days as I am away. We'll see how it goes.
 

Donldson

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Jun 12, 2009
4,588
NW Ohio
I found Taylor has put out testing strips that include CYA.
These are not new, they are quite old and they are just as junk as all the rest. CYA is among the absolute worst thing to test with test strips, just yesterday someone posted a picture of their strips that showed 50+ CYA on a fresh fill. Fresh fill = 0 CYA.

Don't use test strips. They don't work and they are never a great idea. Please get one of the kits that were recommended, not just something with the same brand name.
 
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Dirk

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Nov 12, 2017
7,181
Central California
Can I offer a little advice... It seems you are going about things a little unorthodox, looking for your own way, trying to gather facts and methods from here and there. Trying to do as little as possible maybe? Which is fine. It's your pool, if you find something that works for you then you're good-to-go. But you've come to TFP looking for answers and we don't hodge-podge here. We have a VERY specific method of pool care, which requires VERY specific tasks to be performed. This isn't the place to seek a bunch of alternative methods and then decide which you want to try. That's not what TFP provides. If you want to straighten out your pool, and end up with the very best water condition it can provide, we got you, and you'll find a lot of people here that will help you. They sure helped me. But I had to let go of my own ideas about pool care and trust them. And boy did it work! I had to purchase one of only two recommended test kits, I had to learn how to use it, then learn how to post my test results along with all the specifications of my pool. Then I just did what was recommenced to me, and I ended up with a great pool. And here's the crazy part: it's actually very easy to do, and it's by far the cheapest way to take care of a pool (correctly). It's totally up to you, but you won't find any mix'n'match halfway solutions at TFP...