Cloudy water

Jim1590

Member
Jul 4, 2020
21
Stafford Springs CT USA

mknauss

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
Bronze Supporter
May 3, 2014
33,057
Laughlin, NV
Have never seen that one.
You should have enough mixed solution to fill the tube plus a little. So measure how much water is needed to fill the tube. Then round up (might be 30 ml?) and mix your sample with half pool water and half reagent.
 

Jim1590

Member
Jul 4, 2020
21
Stafford Springs CT USA
Have never seen that one.
You should have enough mixed solution to fill the tube plus a little. So measure how much water is needed to fill the tube. Then round up (might be 30 ml?) and mix your sample with half pool water and half reagent.
I checked, it is on the Taylor site. I think it measures down to 20 instead of 40. I effectivly get a 50 / 50 mix. 7ml pool water, 7ml reagent and then repeat to get the reading with some left over. I will order the smaller one off of Taylors website to save on reagent costs.
 

mknauss

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
Bronze Supporter
May 3, 2014
33,057
Laughlin, NV
Check out TFTestkits.net. They also have all the tests and refills you need.

If you are using the Poolmaster pH test, be ware it is only good with FC at 5 ppm or less.
 

Jim1590

Member
Jul 4, 2020
21
Stafford Springs CT USA
TFTTestkits.net is selling the same tube I am using, so I am fine with the numbers I have.

Yes on the PM pH test. I should have the FAS-DPD chlorine test components here in a few days. Just waiting on the powder and R-0003.

The rest of my numbers looking ok?
 

Chasarms

Silver Supporter
May 8, 2020
347
Dardenne Prairie, MO
If your water temp is in the high 80s, you may lose 4-5 ppm of stabilizer a month. At least that’s my experience. I would test it at least every few weeks.

CYA loss seems to be a bit erratic. I started the year with a fresh fill, and I’ve gone through 10 lbs of stabilizer already this year.
 

Jim1590

Member
Jul 4, 2020
21
Stafford Springs CT USA
If your water temp is in the high 80s, you may lose 4-5 ppm of stabilizer a month. At least that’s my experience. I would test it at least every few weeks.

CYA loss seems to be a bit erratic. I started the year with a fresh fill, and I’ve gone through 10 lbs of stabilizer already this year.
My water temp stays in the mid to upper 70s. So, I will pick up one more 4 pound canister to have on hand and test every 2 weeks once I get it in range. Thanks
 

Puertex

Bronze Supporter
Jan 8, 2016
45
Pearland, Texas
I am making some headway.

I have been adding bleach daily to get to 5ppm. On Thursday, I added 32oz (weight) of granular stabilizer to the pool in a white tube sock hung under the pump return. My skimmer basket was too small to put it there. As of last night, it was all dissipated. I would put my pre-stabilizer CYA reading at 0-10

This morning, FC is less than 1, probably 0.5ppm. CYA is 25. The tube only fills halfway, so I assume I am just mixing another batch and keep filling the tube up?

Once stabilized at my goal of 40, how often will I have to add stabilizer? Should I be getting larger containers?
Does bleach lose effectiveness? When I added yesterday, I used a container of liquid Pool Shock containing 12.5% vs the 10% household I have been using.

Anything more I should be doing at this point?

Thanks
Hello,
CYA or stabilizer does not dissipate or evaporate. Its purpose is to slow down the chlorine or bleach evaporation from pool water.
I would make sure that when chemicals are added, that the amount added is proportional to the pool volume to ensure the correct concentration (ppm) is reached.
Once you reach your CYA target level (say 40 to 50 ppm), you should not need to keep adding unless you lose water like when it rains and the water overflows your pool.
Unfortunately Bleach or chlorine will evaporate daily due to many factors including ambient temperatures, wind and pool usage.
In my pool, for example, during summer time, I lose between 2 and 3 ppm of chlorine per day so I have to compensate by adding chlorine daily to my pool.
The pool has a chlorine addiction !
Based on Poolmath here, and the pool volume, you determine how much chlorine you have to add to compensate for what you lose daily.
Sooooo.... Say you add chlorine and get to 5 ppm today. Tomorrow at the same time take a sample and see by how much it went down.
If you lost 1 ppm then add the chlorine prescribed by Poolmath to increase the concentration by 1 ppm.
BTW, I only use liquid chlorine.
I hope this helps...
Puertex
 
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JimMarshall

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jun 5, 2017
1,003
Oil City PA
Hello,
CYA or stabilizer does not dissipate or evaporate. Its purpose is to slow down the chlorine or bleach evaporation from pool water.
I would make sure that when chemicals are added, that the amount added is proportional to the pool volume to ensure the correct concentration (ppm) is reached.
Once you reach your CYA target level (say 40 to 50 ppm), you should not need to keep adding unless you lose water like when it rains and the water overflows your pool.
Unfortunately Bleach or chlorine will evaporate daily due to many factors including ambient temperatures, wind and pool usage.
In my pool, for example, during summer time, I lose between 2 and 3 ppm of chlorine per day so I have to compensate by adding chlorine daily to my pool.
The pool has a chlorine addiction !
Based on Poolmath here, and the pool volume, you determine how much chlorine you have to add to compensate for what you lose daily.
Sooooo.... Say you add chlorine and get to 5 ppm today. Tomorrow at the same time take a sample and see by how much it went down.
If you lost 1 ppm then add the chlorine prescribed by Poolmath to increase the concentration by 1 ppm.
BTW, I only use liquid chlorine.
I hope this helps...
Puertex
just a little nitpick. CYA actually does decrease on its own but the loss is negligible. It naturally degraded by a few PPM per month
 

Puertex

Bronze Supporter
Jan 8, 2016
45
Pearland, Texas
just a little nitpick. CYA actually does decrease on its own but the loss is negligible. It naturally degraded by a few PPM per month
I believe ChemGeek's article in this forum explains the theory of this degradation. Here:
The article states that it is possible to see degradation under certain scenarios.
However, when he tried to check the calculations in real time, he did not obtain the loss predicted by the formula.
In fact, the article states that the observed loss during the real world test (5 ppm over 3 months) could be attributed to test tolerance or splash-out.
Maybe that is why most people in the pool industry will state that there is no degradation of CYA.
I sadly lose most of my CYA due to rain events and the water overflowing the pool.
Respectfully,
Puertex
 

mknauss

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
Bronze Supporter
May 3, 2014
33,057
Laughlin, NV
I lose about 15-20% of the CYA a month during the summer months with no rain or overflow.

High water temperatures and strong UV does degrade CYA level over time.
 
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Puertex

Bronze Supporter
Jan 8, 2016
45
Pearland, Texas
OK, so once I get it to a good level, it should be fine. I will still be adding daily chlorine, but hopefully less than I would if CYA was very low.
You will lose a lot less chlorine. Without stabilizer you could lose up to 90% of chlorine in a few hours.
Also, try not to add too much CYA. General rule: not less than 30 and not higher than 50 ppm.
As the concentration of CYA increases, you have to also increase the chlorine concentration.
I try to keep mine between 40 and 50 ppm.
Good luck !

Puertex
 

Puertex

Bronze Supporter
Jan 8, 2016
45
Pearland, Texas
I lose about 15-20% of the CYA a month during the summer months with no rain or overflow.

High water temperatures and strong UV does degrade CYA level over time.
Well, I am left with some questions regarding this subject...
Why does ChemGeek's article fail to prove that much loss?
And why do several references found all over the internet fail to state this huge loss?
Also, my own personal situation, living in Texas near the coast and not experiencing this loss.
Seems to me that if such a huge loss was experienced by many, that it would be widely recognized and documented.
But it is not.

Respectfully,

Puertex
 

mknauss

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
Bronze Supporter
May 3, 2014
33,057
Laughlin, NV
Those of us in the desert have that. S Texas does not have the UV load we have. You have humidity and clouds. We do not.

Mine is on the high side because of my location. Those in Phoenix, Tucson, and Las Vegas most likely do not have that high as they are all higher elevation and not as hot.
 

Puertex

Bronze Supporter
Jan 8, 2016
45
Pearland, Texas
Those of us in the desert have that. S Texas does not have the UV load we have. You have humidity and clouds. We do not.

Mine is on the high side because of my location. Those in Phoenix, Tucson, and Las Vegas most likely do not have that high as they are all higher elevation and not as hot.
Maybe, in the future, the pool industry will pick up on this finding and start changing how they describe CYA's characteristics and behavior.