Borate drop test kit

JoyfulNoise

TFP Expert
Platinum Supporter
May 23, 2015
15,885
Tucson, AZ
Strips will only give you a ballpark value - 0, 15, 30, 50, 80ppm is typical. They are not very accurate and they can bleach out easily with high chlorine.
The drop test above is similar to what is described here on TFP but keep in mind that the manufacturer has designed their test around industrial/consumer water sources that DO NOT contain a strong oxidizer like chlorine. So you may have problems with their test method if you don’t first neutralize the chlorine in your sample water.
 

malba2366

Well-known member
Jul 27, 2016
69
Middletown, NY
Strips will only give you a ballpark value - 0, 15, 30, 50, 80ppm is typical. They are not very accurate and they can bleach out easily with high chlorine.
The drop test above is similar to what is described here on TFP but keep in mind that the manufacturer has designed their test around industrial/consumer water sources that DO NOT contain a strong oxidizer like chlorine. So you may have problems with their test method if you don’t first neutralize the chlorine in your sample water.
So if the pool chlorine (SWCG) is kept at 4 ppm, will this affect this test. I believe the max allowable FC level in tap water is 4 ppm.
 

JoyfulNoise

TFP Expert
Platinum Supporter
May 23, 2015
15,885
Tucson, AZ
So if the pool chlorine (SWCG) is kept at 4 ppm, will this affect this test. I believe the max allowable FC level in tap water is 4 ppm.
You will likely need to dechlorinate your water sample.
Most municipal water suppliers have switched over the chloramination for disinfection and don’t allow levels of FC higher than 1ppm to protect the distribution system from corrosion. The EPA limit of FC in drinking water is 4ppm but that is incredibly high and would produce a fairly strong chlorine odor. Most municipal supplies keep the total chlorine (FC + CC) at, or below, 1ppm. The presence of CC’s (mostly monochloramine) will have very little impact on the test results.